Oh Queen, where art thou?

Discussion in 'Beekeeping' started by Kathy'sKID, Nov 3, 2004.

  1. Kathy'sKID

    Kathy'sKID Kelly in Nebraksa

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    Nov 3, 2004
    Location:
    Nebraska
    Ok, I started a new hive late this year (July) and I have not been able to find my queen in the last four checkings (about 2 months time?), starting to get a little worried as to weather or not she is still in there. I have not see eggs, or larva, but there is some capped brood, but I understand it is not unusual for queens to stop laying at this time of year. If she is gone/dead/brutally murdered is it too late in the year to replace her? Should I wait till spring? Do I need to know for sure that she is gone/dead/brutally murdered before I attempt to replace her? Or should I just go ahead and get a new queen just to be safe?


    . . . I miss my queen. :waa:
     
  2. justgojumpit

    justgojumpit Well-Known Member

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    May 5, 2003
    Location:
    North Salem, NY
    Hey, don't fret too much! My queens have all stopped laying weeks ago (southern NY) however, two months is a long time... You have brood, which means that the queen was around within the past few weeks. chances are she is just hiding from you. are there any queen cells? if the queen disappeared/died/was brutally murdered, the bees would have raised new queens to battle out leadership of the hive. Bees with eggs will not remain queenless for long. i wouldn't worry about it. if in spring time you find no eggs, then get worried!

    justgojumpit
     

  3. Kathy'sKID

    Kathy'sKID Kelly in Nebraksa

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    Nov 3, 2004
    Location:
    Nebraska
    Alrighty then, I'll just wait till spring and see what happens, oh, and no queen cells that I can find. Thanks!
     
  4. Mutti

    Mutti Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Location:
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    MY DH says there are lots of signs of being queenless. Are the bees still coming and going freely on warmer days? they are just mainly bringing in water this time of year but there should be some activity. Even in the winter a queen will lay some eggs in the cluster since bees only live so long...a bit longer in the winter as they aren't flying their little wings off but they have to keep the size of the cluster up so they don't freeze out. The bees have to start with a 3 day old egg to make a new queen...generally there will be worker bees on the brood covering/caring for the brood....in general if you have eggs you have a queen. When you buy a new queen in the spring you might have them mark her so it is easier for you to spot her. DEE
     
  5. Terri

    Terri Singletree & Weight Loss & Permaculture Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    Is the capped brood drone brood, or are they worker brood?

    Drone brood has caps on it that are bulging and are shaped just like a bullet. A laying worker can lay drone brood.

    If the brood has ordinary caps they are worker brood, and only a queen can lay worker brood. Worker brood means that your queen was present and laying within the last 2 weeks.