Oh,in And Wi?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by BASIC, Jun 19, 2005.

  1. BASIC

    BASIC Well-Known Member

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    Hi again,we're looking for information and opinions about moving to OH,ID and WI.We need jobs,affordable wooded property,snow(I plow),deer,nice people and access to health care.Any suggestion please.Thanks as always,BASIC.
     
  2. Nomad

    Nomad Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I'm in NE Ohio and we get plenty of snow. I think property prices are reasonable compared to many I've seen...at least where there is snow. Not sure about jobs. I'm a designer/drafter and am making about 15% less than I was three years ago after being out of work for eight months last year. It depends on what type of job you do. A lot of the jobs in this area are tied to the auto industry, so it's feast or famine. Were you asking about Indiana or Idaho? I'm originally from Wisconsin but haven't been there in years. From what I've found in searches, property is pretty pricey. Best people in the world tho.

    Good Luck in your search,

    Nomad
     

  3. BASIC

    BASIC Well-Known Member

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    Nomad,thanks for your reply.I was asking about Indiana,sorry.I've heard there is a snow belt in OH do you know where that is?BASIC.
     
  4. Mike in Ohio

    Mike in Ohio Well-Known Member

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    I'm in NE Ohio and Nomad is right... lots of snow. If you really want lots of snow then look along the Lake Erie shore in the snow belt. Lots of lake effect snow.

    I'm a transplant to Ohio and I like it. Now, there are lots of things I don't like or find strange but in balance it works for us. There are economic issues but the time to buy is when everyone else is selling....especially if you plan on holding long term. Good fertile land (and woods) at what I consider reasonable prices given the proximity to markets.

    Carroll County (where our farm is located) has plenty of deer (they just made it 3 deer per person in season, up from 2). In the past few years I have seen prices ranging from $900 per acre up to $6,000 per acre depending on what improvements there are and the location. Amish are moving into the area so they must think this is a good place to be.

    Mike
     
  5. BASIC

    BASIC Well-Known Member

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    Mike,good mornning and thanks.We just need enough wooded land to heat our house,hunt on and as a perimeter with neighbors.Its hard trying to find an area with a balace between rural and developed.By no means do we want to live far away from civilization just at a comfortable distance.We also have to keep in mind any development that may happen in the future.Thank you sir,BASIC.
     
  6. Nomad

    Nomad Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Mike has answered the snow question. There are places that get feet instead of inches at a time. Fortunately, though we get snow where I live I miss the big stuff by 30 miles or so.

    Nomad
     
  7. BASIC

    BASIC Well-Known Member

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    Mike,you wrote that theres things that you don't like or find strage about OH,would you mind telling us please?BASIC
     
  8. Mike in Ohio

    Mike in Ohio Well-Known Member

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    Well, at least speaking about NE Ohio, there is what I call the "other peoples money" approach. Given the fact that the economy lags here, there are all sorts of people who feel they can do wonderful things to improve circumstances.... if only they are given other peoples money.

    So, the solution to education problems....throw money at it. (This has been going on in Ohio for a while with cases that have gone to the Ohio Supreme Court multiple times, etc.) Spending on education has increased significantly but there are groups that want more money.

    Another example is when LTV was going bankrupt. Local (Cleveland, Cuyahoga County) politicos were trying to raise $250 million of taxpayer money to give to LTV. The thing was toast. Everyone knew it but they were pandering to the retiree and widow votes.

    One of the current big things is whether to build a new convention center in Cleveland. The people who think it is a great idea want to pay for it with other peoples money.

    Another thing I find odd is that a lot of municipalities (at least in the Cleveland area) fund things like recreation centers (I'm not talking basic ones for kids.... major bucks) and senior centers. I'm not used to that and I'm not sure it's a good use of tax dollars.

    Lots of retraining programs for laid off factory workers. I'm not sure how many network administrators, etc are needed in Ohio but lots of instant experts..... and no jobs for all those new network administrators.

    I just pay my taxes (minimize them to the extent possible, legally of course) and get on with my life.

    If you move to the Cleveland area you will encounter something called RITA (Regional Income Tax Authority). Local governments have income taxes and use RITA to collect them. You can be taxed based on where you work AND where you live. Some municipalities (where you live) give you a credit (partial or full) for taxes you paid where you work (Assuming it is not where you live). In any event, it generates a lot of unhappiness.

    Switching gears, we have what we call "Ohio traffic jams". People will be in the left hand lane (doing the legal limit of course) pacing a cehicle in the right hand lane. You end up with all sorts of cars bunched up for extended periods together because of this. I much prefer the law in Pennsylvania where you are supposed to pull left only for passing.

    I do find more rural areas (like Carroll County) more to my taste. People are by and large friendly and if you are straight with people they are by and large straight with you.

    If you are out this way and looking you should check out the area where our farm is. It has been somewhat overlooked for development despite it's proximity to major metropolitan areas (Cleveland, Akron/Canton and Pittsburgh) because the only way to get into the county is on 2 lane roads. In the immediate area of our farm it is a mix of farms and smaller subdivisions (5 to 10 acres). Many people (like myself) have their property in agricultural districts and are trying to maintain the rural character of the area.

    Just a few random thoughts.

    Mike
     
  9. MelissaW

    MelissaW Well-Known Member

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    Hi Basic!

    I'm also in NE Ohio, and was born and raised in the "snow belt". Lake, Geauga, Ashtabula, and Northern Portage and Trumbell counties are the hardest hit. We got well over 100 inches this year. Geauga is definately the snowiest in my opinion. It is a lovely county with a large Amish population and quite a lot of factories (Kraftmaid is probably the biggest. The pay is not great in any of them unfortunately). Acreage is a bit higher there than it is in Ashtabula or Portage. Lake is very high, and quite developed. Employment rates are better in this area than they are in SE Ohio. The Columbus area is growing fast, and there are jobs to be found there too. I live far enough away from Cleveland that the issues there haven't affected us much, and I suppose we just don't notice the other Ohio oddities :haha: ! Property taxes are quite high. Land prices vary. To give you an idea of my town, a 5 acre lot on my street is listed at 48,000 right now, and the 149 acre farm on the next street over that is for sale is 450,000. Neither has a house on it. Best of luck finding the right place!
     
  10. Lerxt

    Lerxt Well-Known Member

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    Indiana...well snow is gonna happen but it's spotty at best unless you get up north near the lakes. Last winter we had some really good snow though.

    We're in south-central IN. Owen county. People are friendly but it's a very poor area. Morgan county to the east is more developed but still has it's rural areas. Brown county to the east of that is a touristy, nature reserve controlled area where you can drop $20k on an acre of woodland that you can only reach by a one lane dirt road. Stupid amounts of money for land you really can't use in any way you want.

    There is a college town (Indiana University) nearby and it has quite a lot of money. Some areas there are really pricey.

    I drive 65 miles one way to work in Indy as a programmer (hoping I can eventually telecommute) because there is no work for me around here. We paid about $5k per acre and felt we got a good deal. We're 10 minutes from the nearest grocery and 15 minutes from the nearest good grocery. :)

    Tons of deer. We rarely go a day without seeing at least one on our property. I drive 5-10 under the speed limit on our local roads because I'm afraid of hitting one or 6 all at once. Well, that and I nearly went head on into a logging truck as I rounded a blind curve...but that's another story. Wild turkeys as well. Flocks of em all over.

    There's not a whole lot of conspicuous industry here. Lots of small farms/homesteads. I met my neighbor when he came over looking for his calf that got out. Odd that we're the only ones with chickens that I've seen near by.

    All in all I like the area but I wish I didn't have to drive so far to get to a job that I'm trained for. But it's worth it none the less.

    Sorry for the free-thought ramble. It's a nice area. Quiet, friendly, a little behind the times and I like it for that. If we feel the need to go to a bigger city it's about an hour away.
     
  11. MelissaW

    MelissaW Well-Known Member

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    I asked my husband what snowplowers are charging. He said the guy next door pays $35 per plow (300 foot driveway). He also said that the guy who plows the lot where he works plows on contract, which means during a horrible snow season like the last one, they actually do worse because they get the same amount of money for the season regardless of the number of times they plow. I know the ODOT snowplow drivers make a decent wage too.
     
  12. Elizabeth M

    Elizabeth M Well-Known Member

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    I'm checking in from SE Indiana..

    Job situation is okay since Cincinnati (where I work) is relatively close and in SE Indiana there are 3 gambling boats in the area.

    Land is mostly hilly here but plenty of wildlife (wild turkey, deer,etc) and woods and the Ohio river is here also.

    The people are very nice and down to earth and if you find a small town like I have (Aurora) people go out of their way to help you.

    Cincinnati has some of the best hospitals in the midwest and the best Childrens Hopsital anywhere (unfortunately, I know)

    Snow is only bad usually once a winter, sometimes only light snow all winter.
     
  13. BASIC

    BASIC Well-Known Member

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    Thankyou all again for your helpful replys.The impresion I get about OH,IN and WI is that there alot like upstate NY maybe its a "rustbelt thing".I'm sure there all great places to live but nothing stands out thats going to be much different than NY(except,IN is much more conservitive).Thankyou all again,BASIC.
     
  14. Gary in ohio

    Gary in ohio Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Snow belt is North of Interstate 70. South of i70 gets snow but not as much as north. NE gets LOTS of snow due to the lake effect.

     
  15. BASIC

    BASIC Well-Known Member

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    Thanks Gary.I thought about what I just wrote,OH,IN and Wi are different than NY.NY is not the Midwest and along with the Midwest I think of the nice people,small towns,farms,good values and a nive life,not that NY doesn't have that.What about tornadoes in OH and IN,are there areas where there more prevalent than others?If we eliminate the need for snow,what areas would have desent wooded land/house prices,deer and jobs?I like the fact there are Amish in the area.Someone mentioned about southeastern IN as being a nice place to live,any feedback?Youv'e all been great about answering my questions,thanyou,BASIC.
     
  16. Elizabeth M

    Elizabeth M Well-Known Member

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    There is an Amish community around Greensburg/Rushville Indiana. It's nice up there also (flatter land). As far as I'm concerned there is plenty of deer to be had here. My hubby meets his quota every year.

    Yes, we do get tornados but you have to keep it in perspective. Here they tend to be very localized (one house gets destroyed and the neighbors house is fine).

    Land generally goes for about $3,000/acre
    Nice big house for 100,000
    Farmhouse for much less

    Yes, Indiana is conservative. They also tend to let you do what you want as long as no one complains. I came here from Ohio 6 years ago.

    My daughter just got a job at Argosy casino with incredible benefits and starts at $10/hr. Not too shabby for an 18 yr old college student.

    Hope this helps.
     
  17. BASIC

    BASIC Well-Known Member

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    Elizabeth M,ma'am,yes it does help.One house is still one to many.Do you know if the tornadoes are localized to a certain ares?Thankyou,BASIC.
     
  18. Elizabeth M

    Elizabeth M Well-Known Member

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    [Do you know if the tornadoes are localized to a certain ares?Thankyou,BASIC.[/QUOTE]

    Not that I can tell. But it does seems to be better here than further northwest in the state.
     
  19. ajaxlucy

    ajaxlucy Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I don't know about OH or WI, but if you're planning on homeschooling, then Indiana is a state that lets you do it your way. You don't have to submit a curriculum for the approval of state educators, and there's no requirement for standardized testing.
     
  20. Mel-

    Mel- Well-Known Member

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    I live about 35 miles or so south of indy. pricewise here land is 20k or better an acre. 100k will buy you an older house in town but not much out in the country.

    I've lived most of my 4 decades in indiana and have never seen a tornado. had one hit a mile from my house, have been right behind one going through our town and never knew it but honestly, it's really not something to be concerned about. if you move far enough north to get the kind of snow you want, you'll have a better chance of flipping your car than dying in a tornado. many many times better.

    if you want lots of snow you really are limited to the very very northern section. that area up there has alot of amish but land is getting pricey as well. you can check on realtor.com.

    conservative, yea you could say that ;) in the entire history of our state, a democratic presidential candidate has NEVER carried our state.