NZ Glossary needed....

Discussion in 'Cattle' started by Up North, May 8, 2006.

  1. Up North

    Up North KS dairy farmers

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    What would really be helpful as more New Zealand contributors come on board would be a Glossary of term translations so all could understand more readily.
    For Example:
    NZ Mob = A group of milking cows or heifers.
    NZ Milking Shed = US Milking Parlor
    NZ Back Break = Back Fence
    I'm sure there is a very long list.........Any contributors out there care to carry on? TIA
     
  2. Philip

    Philip Philip

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    Hi UpNorth. Yes, after finding out that MiG farming is rotational grazing, perhaps you are right. I'm not sure if any if the names below are NZ-specific, or not, but heres a couple;
    Hot wire = electric fence
    Sheep by age (very approximate)
    lamb - up to one year
    Hogget - 1 to 2 years (also two tooth)
    (hogget ewes or hogget rams)
    Ewe or Ram - greater than 2 years, by year 4 tooths or 6 tooths, after that ... most probably dog tucker !
    Sheep meat is usually classified as lamb, hogget and mutton

    One I have never worked out - in US literature they talk about 'hardware cloth' - what is this ? Chicken wire ? Shade cloth ?
     

  3. JeffNY

    JeffNY Seeking Type

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    New Zealander = Kiwi

    Kiwi = New Zealander ;). I contributed to the cause, k?



    Jeff
     
  4. YuccaFlatsRanch

    YuccaFlatsRanch Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Hardware cloth is inexpensive galvanized woven wire withusually a 1/2 by 1/2 inch mesh. Best used for putting on screen doors to protect the screen from children or dogs.
     
  5. Up North

    Up North KS dairy farmers

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    NZ Lucerne = US Alfalfa
    NZ dog Tucker = US dog food
    NZ The Boot = US Trunk of Car
    NZ The Bonnet = US Hood of Car
    NZ Lorry = US Large straight truck or Semi?
    NZ Silo = US Milk Bulk Tank
    ...........carry on ...........................................
     
  6. Valmai

    Valmai Well-Known Member

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  7. Ronney

    Ronney Well-Known Member

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    Cowshed or milking shed = milking parlour
    Dog tucker = usually a culled ewe or ram past his use by date. Can apply to
    all dog food.
    Works, Wx = abbotoir.
    Bobby Calf = a calf not required for herd replacement and subsequently sent
    to the works. This term came about when farmers were paid
    one shilling for a calf at the works. A shilling was known as a
    "bob" hence the term bobby calf.
    Empty, MT = An unbred cow or heifer.
    Calf/lamb at foot = a ewe or cow with her young running with her.
    Springing or springer = a cow close to calving.
    Mob = applies to both sheep and cattle, usually beef cattle. A dairy herd
    will still be referred to as a herd. A little confusing as I keep a flock of
    70 sheep but run them in three mobs according to age.
    Mixed Age, M/A = A mob of cattle or sheep (but usually sheep) that are not
    of the same age.
    RWB = Running with the bull.
    Break Feeding = Using a portable electric fence unit and standards to strip
    feed a permanently fenced paddock. This is usually done
    with autumn saved pasture but is also done with crops when
    a portion of the crop will be strip fed and an adjoining
    paddock of grass will be strip fed in conjunction. Applies to
    both beef and dairy.
    Back Fencing = When two portable electric fences are used - one to create
    a new strip, the other to fence off the portion already grazed
    to allow it to come away again.
    Sacrifice Paddocks = an area where cows are held over late winter and fed
    hay, the idea being to conserve feed and to stop them
    pugging up paddocks. The "sacrifice" paddock will be
    ruined and will be disced and resown.
    Mutton = a term used to cover all sheep meat but specifically applies to
    anything older than a hogget.
    Drenching = worming and despite the ever increasing use of pour ons, it is
    still referred to as drenching.

    Philip, you didn't get the ageing of your sheep quite right. At two years old it should have two adult teeth (two tooth), at 3 years old it should have four adult teeth (4th), at 4 years old it should have six adult teeth (6th) and at 5 years old will have 8 adult teeth as is known as Full Mouth. Anything older than that is known as Aged. This ageing applies to all sexes.

    Cheers,
    Ronnie
     
  8. Philip

    Philip Philip

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    Ronney, you swine - how dare you impune my sheep aging techniques ! Just as well I said 'very approximate'. Hahaha - oh well, back to the drawing board.
    That must mean we'll need to include that greatest of kiwi phrases 'well, bugger me' = surprise/dismay/delight/a greeting/horror/any situation in fact - it can be used to fill any empty space regardless of company or gravitas of the situation
     
  9. Ronney

    Ronney Well-Known Member

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    Ah but Philip I wasn't that clever - I forgot that a sheep actually ends up with eight adult teeth, not six. I've gone back and corrected it. :)

    Cheers,
    Ronnie.
     
  10. Up North

    Up North KS dairy farmers

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    Hoping NZ folks could explain your sharemilkers system of farm transition?
     
  11. Philip

    Philip Philip

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    Sharemilking .... weeellllllll, at the risk of having Ronney give me a smack around the lugs again .....
    Its normally used as a way for a younger farmer to get into farm ownership, in which the sharemilker will own all or part of the herd, while the farm owner supplies the farm, complete with milking shed, sharemilkers house etc, and the profit from the sale of the milk (usually paid as a per kg price for milksolids by the dairy company, unless on town supply) is split between the owner and the sharemilker. The sharemilker can increase their herd numbers and keep the additional value. Most dairy farmers here sell to Fonterra dairy company, and have to buy shares valued at the amount of milk solids supplied. At the moment the price is about $5.85 per share (1 share - 1 kg MS). My understanding is that the owner holds the shares, but I stand to corrected on this.
    Sharemilkers can come into an arrangement at any point by negotiation. Often they start off owing only part of the herd, and increase their numbers by either buying a set number of the owners herd each year or through calving. A 50/50 split is relatively common
    Thats only the bare bones as I understand it