Number one reason to build with Structural insulated panels.

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by painterswife, Jul 16, 2006.

  1. painterswife

    painterswife Sock puppet reinstated Supporter

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    It is in the 90's out side but it is 66 inside with no airconditioning!

    Jill
     
  2. Lindafisk

    Lindafisk Well-Known Member

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    Gosh then I wish we had those! This brick house has NO insulation and the sc is running almost constantly to keep it at 80!
     

  3. susieM

    susieM Well-Known Member

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    What are those?
     
  4. painterswife

    painterswife Sock puppet reinstated Supporter

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    They are an alternative to stick building. Panels of OSB with insulation inside. Very well insulated.
     
  5. Dubai Vol

    Dubai Vol Well-Known Member

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  6. painterswife

    painterswife Sock puppet reinstated Supporter

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  7. ET1 SS

    ET1 SS zone 5 - riverfrontage Supporter

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    I spent the day blowing Styrofoam onto our walls.

    It sure makes a big difference on the heat!

    I am spraying 2 inches onto our steel walls.

    :)
     
  8. omnicat

    omnicat Well-Known Member

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    Dang, I'm jealous. My house is cinderblock, with plaster direct on the inside and stucco on the outside. It's got an insulation value of R2. yeehaw. We freeze in winter and have trouble staying cool in summer. (I spend time running around sticking fans in the windows to suck in the night air, then take 'em all out in the morning and close the windows to hold on to the inside temps for a bit.)
     
  9. Dubai Vol

    Dubai Vol Well-Known Member

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    I'd be very interested to hear about that. Got any links?
     
  10. ET1 SS

    ET1 SS zone 5 - riverfrontage Supporter

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  11. Dubai Vol

    Dubai Vol Well-Known Member

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  12. fin29

    fin29 Well-Known Member

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    Did you buy a pre-fab kit with all the windows, doors, etc. already cut or did you build with whole panels and then cut them yourself? Do you have an air exchanger to deal with how air-tight the structure is? Can you recommend a manufacturer? We're contemplating a modified post and beam strawbale house, but darn it, SIPS seem so much easier, especially since we'll have to hire out the building due to my husband's schedule. Plus, the energu efficiency of the SIPS seems comparable with the strawbale without all of the potential moisture (etc.) problems of strawbale, since we get so much snow here.
     
  13. beorning

    beorning Well-Known Member

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    What is the cost of building with SIPs, versus conventional stick and bat? I'm also curious as to how feasible it is to construct with them on your own ( assuming some basic stick framing construction knowledge) The nearest builder I could find to me that uses SIPs is three hours away.
     
  14. ET1 SS

    ET1 SS zone 5 - riverfrontage Supporter

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    You might also want to look into steel buildings with spray-on foam. We found them to be much cheaper than stick buildings. And you have no interior load-bearing walls. The outer-walls fully support the roof. So it changes your floor plan a lot as suddenly you can have big open spaces in your home.

    We have a 60 by 40, The only permanent walls interior are around the shower-stall and bathroom. For around the bedrooms we have built 8 foot tall partitions, so we can move them, or change the floor layout anytime we wish to.

    :)
     
  15. fin29

    fin29 Well-Known Member

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    The information I have suggests that the initial cost is comparable with stick framing but the labor costs are lower (it generally takes a crew of three about half a day to erect a 2000 sq. foot house) and the average energy savings (obviously depending on the thickness of the SIPs you choose) are minimum 50%. Depending on finishes, the cost averages $100-$150 a square foot.
     
  16. jassytoo

    jassytoo Well-Known Member Supporter

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    ET1 SS, I like the idea of the steel with sprayed on foam building. Do you have a website address for that? Thanks
     
  17. Country Doc

    Country Doc Well-Known Member

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    My houses was made using SIP 18 years ago. Paid off many times over. I think easier to install the stick frame but different and has to be done correctly. Biggest good surprise -can hang pictures anywhere-no studs. Biggest bad surprise -nearly impossible to run extra wiring for outlet etc after it is built so plan ahead. You also use it for the roof inside if not cathedral ceilings. You will have alot of cut out windows, etc when done.
     
  18. painterswife

    painterswife Sock puppet reinstated Supporter

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    We used our design. They decide how the panels will be cut. We had all the window and door openings precut. It went up in a couple od days with a small crew(2-3 guys) who had never done SIP's before Yes you need an air exchanger.

    Sips are priced per square foot of wall and roof area. It may cost a bit more than Stick but the energy savings is more than worth it. We have no drafts! I very much appreciate that when the winter winds are blowing.


    fin29, where are you building?
     
  19. ET1 SS

    ET1 SS zone 5 - riverfrontage Supporter

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    http://www.freedomsteel.com/
     
  20. Pick-Axe

    Pick-Axe Member

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    A little caveat.

    ICF, insulated concrete form, construction is the next step up from insulated panels,IMHO.

    http://www.concrete-home.com/

    http://www.icfhomes.com/

    http://www.forms.org/

    I have 3600 sq.ft. house with a walk out basement it has concrete forms to the roof. It has cost me $500/year to heat and cool my house over the last 3 years; granted I have a geothermal heat pump for heating and cooling which is very efficient.

    FYI

    Pick-Axe