Nova Scotia questions....

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Patt, Jan 3, 2007.

  1. Patt

    Patt Well-Known Member

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    I was wondering if we have any homesteaders in Nova Scotia? We were looking at maybe migrating up there in a few years but then read that the laws can be kind of hard on homesteaders. Can anyone give us an idea of what it is like there?
     
  2. Ramblin Wreck

    Ramblin Wreck Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I did not run across any homesteading "roadblocks" when researching property purchases in Canada (New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, & PEI). I bought in New Brunswick, and it was very similar to buying property in the states. While it's easy for Americans to buy property and use it in New Brunswick, it is much more difficult to become a permanent resident or citizen of Canada.
     

  3. mpillow

    mpillow Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Rainy and windy....and a great place to play golf....also expensive food wise.
     
  4. moonwolf

    moonwolf Well-Known Member

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    a new poster on Singltree Forum is 'newfieannie' that recently posted, which I believe she said she is homesteading in Nova Scotia. she might tune in here, or you maybe could PM and encourage her to post what it's like there.
     
  5. Jan Sears

    Jan Sears Well-Known Member

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    If you go to www.acountrylife.com they have a whole section on imigrating to Nova Scotia. The Editor is very knowledgeable on the subject.
    All the best.
     
  6. DixyDoodle

    DixyDoodle stranger than fiction

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    I'm in Ontario, but I can tell you: you'd better like lousy weather! I have several relatives in Halifax, NS and the surrounding areas. They get a lot of rainstorms and/or snow.....more snow than we get even, and we're inlanders. They seem to measure their snow in feet, rather than inches (or should I say centimetres and metres? :p ).

    What can ya say? Driving in snow is a pain; when you can actually dig your car out, that is. Nova Scotia has some awesome scenery, though. :)

    DD
     
  7. ldc

    ldc Well-Known Member Supporter

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    As Jan Sears posted above, if you go to www.acountrylife.com, the reason they are so knowledgeble is that the editor of the newsletter, her family, and a few other readers of the newsletter, all moved to Nova Scotia in the last few years from England. She even has a section on how to legally immigrate and buy land, lots on the land itself, and different small businesses possible. they also list properties for their neighbors and others. I'll never forget a nearby (to them!) flower farm for 39,000Canadian! Good luck! ldc
     
  8. Ramblin Wreck

    Ramblin Wreck Well-Known Member Supporter

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    If you can stand Maine/Vermont/New Hampshire weather, I don't think Nova Scotia would be much different. The biggest difference I see after crossing the border from Maine to New Brunswick is that the roads get much freer of litter almost immediately. That's not a knock on Maine. That's pretty much true of all the lower 48.
     
  9. DixyDoodle

    DixyDoodle stranger than fiction

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    newfieannie, well.....besides this year, I mean! LOL I recall the east coast having a massive snowstorm last year, with pics in our papers of people having to dig out of their front doors. Some areas got well over a metre at a time, I believe? Yuk, you can keep it. We get more cold than snow.

    I agree, this year is totally out of whack. Normally here in Ontario, we're shovelling calf-high snow if it's bad and dreading the sound of the snow plows: it reminds one of how much darned snow is out there. This year though.....calling for +9 C for tomorrow, normally it's closer to -9 or much worse. Not that I want to complain much.

    Is it just me or is something definitely wrong this year, though? I don't EVER recall us having a green landscape like this in January, let alone above-freezing temps.
     
  10. Patt

    Patt Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for all of your input everyone! :)
    I had a pretty good idea of the weather I was curious about laws restricting animals and other things thta pertain to homesteading. I've heard Canada is a lot stricter than the US.
     
  11. Mountaineer

    Mountaineer Well-Known Member

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    You'd have to find out the zoning of the property and go from there. From my experience if you have an actual farm (make a minimum of $2500 per year) you can get away with almost anything. I myself don't need building permits for farm buildings and have hugely reduced taxes on my farm.
    Seems like all of the maritime provinces, not just NS have surprisingly cheap land. There is reason for that with a fairly poor economy, but if you have your own plans that's not really an issue.
     
  12. Ramblin Wreck

    Ramblin Wreck Well-Known Member Supporter

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    What you write has been my experience in New Brunswick. Great people, great land, and not a lot of people/government staffers looking over your shoulder. I'm not as familiar with Nova Scotia though.

    As an aside, but something that provides perspective: In Harcourt I was looking at some hand made (from Birch) moose calls at a roadside stand where 116 runs into 126. While there, a train heading South parallel to 126 comes to a stop. The engineer jumps out, runs up, and buys a moose call! You'd never see that in the lower 48. Also, when my brother asked the gentleman who made and was selling the calls to demonstrate calling a moose, he very dilberately puts it up to his mouth, clears his throat, and calls "here moose, moose, moose, moose, moose". We all doubled over laughing.

    My moose call is hanging from a post on the railing that surrounds my upstairs loft.
     
  13. sullen

    sullen Question Answerer

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    NewfieAnnie..........my dh is a Newfie......I met tons that live in NS.
    Anyway DH and I wouldn't mind moving up there to NB if the oil industry gets started. We would love some of that oil money. And the state of Maine is geting more and more liberal......too much control for me. I expect that sort of thing in Canada :p .....not here.
     
  14. DixyDoodle

    DixyDoodle stranger than fiction

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    Do you already have a plot you are interested in? I take it you don't, since you said you were just thinking of moving later, but here's something else to consider:

    Don't assume that if you are talking to someone in a particular area of Nova Scotia and they say "we are allowed to have this" that the same laws will apply for the entire province. If they are anything like here in Ontario, the laws vary according to the township you are in. For example, one township (county) here allows you to have 1 large animal (horse, cow, etc) per 2 acres, a very loose law, and the neighbouring township will not let you have a hobby farm unless you start out with the basic 50 acres with prior township approval (older smaller homesteads are grandfathered, exempt from the 50 acre rule, but new owners still need permission before they can own X numer of livestock). So even the laws in that province may vary.

    I assume Nova Scotia (as well as the other provinces) is like Ontario in that respect. And the laws do change over time, so what goes today might not go tomorrow. I noticed that a lot of local laws here changed after the Waterton ('poisoned' water) scandal.

    I would be sure to check on the law before you buy a particular plot. And don't just go by what the real estate agent tells you.....they don't always know the rules either. We actually bid on a property once that the real estate agent swore was hobby farm rated, and it was not. Fortunately for us, we called the township for verification before we bought it....otherwise, we would have been stuck with 12 acres we couldn't even put a horse on! It pays to check.

    DD
     
  15. sullen

    sullen Question Answerer

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    DH is from north of Gander, a teeeeny town that you can see Fogo from. 8 hour drive from the ferry.
    I didn't know there were any people on the "south coast" anymore.......
     
  16. neolady

    neolady Well-Known Member

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    well - I'm a nova scotia-er and moved here from Ontario in 1990. Contrary to what an Ontario individual said, we do not in the Halifax area get more snow than Ontario. Moncton certainly gets far more than we do, as does my mother who lives just north of Toronto, Ontario. The only major snowstorm in the Halifax area in the last few years was "White Juan" in Feb. 2004 which followed Hurricane Juan of September, 2003.

    Our frost free days are much greater in number than southern Ontario, but we do not general have the heat degrees. There is more fog here than you get in many locations, but it is generalized more along the water i.e. the ocean and is similar to what you get along the Great Lakes in Ontario. Fog is not a generalization through the entire Maritimes - it is more location specific.

    Property costs have risen dramatically over the last five years in any area where there is reasonable employment. Much cheaper land is available in area where you will have to travel several hours to a half-decent job. Labour rates here are well below what the Ontario rates and most of the other country are, and our labour laws and standard are among the worst in the country.

    Food, machinery, products, equipment are a fair bit higher than you would pay in Ontario and when I come back from vacation in Ontario, I usually bring back a full load in the van of groceries, goods, etc. I recently bought a used tractor in Ontario for about 1/2 the price for the same product here and even paying the shipping costs I saved several thousand dollars.

    I see absolutely no savings in insurance - automobile or property and our automobile insurance legislation is horrendous. Property taxes here are about on par with what I am familiar with in Ontario (we recently went through an amalgamation that brought our rural property into the urban tax base and that definitely hurt us). Figure generally about $1200-1500 annual tax per $100,000 of assessment (about the same as Ontario). Some very rural areas will run less than this. Municipal services are below what you would receive in many other locations.


    Also a note on purchasing in PEI - there are restrictions on "foreigners" purchasing some properties.
     
  17. fellini123

    fellini123 Well-Known Member

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    Lived in NS for 5 years in the 80s. Absolutely loved it!!!! Lived in Shelbourne, does that qualify me as a South Easterner????
    It has been a long time ago and I hear there is a lot more touristie things going on now. But cost of living was very cheap, especially in American dollars.
    Didn't homestead only had one dog, but had several american friends that had bought houses and land there and just loved it. Got a lot more house for their dollar than they would have in the states.
    Taxes were killers, at the time I think it was about 10% on everything you bought, but you got a rebate of a sort every year. But medical care was great!!!!
    Would love to go back for awhile. I had the very best garden I ever had in NS, much better than anything I was ever able to grow, even in FL. I think it was the long days of summer. The black flies about killed me every year!!!! and I was usually at work during the one full weekend of summer sun!!! LOL
    But all in all I LOVED IT!!!!
    Snow??? Not much only one year did we had it last longer than 3 or 4 days.
    Alice in Virginia
     
  18. neolady

    neolady Well-Known Member

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    >>>>This winter is even milder than usual and there is absolutely no snow on the ground and temperatures are double digit at present but starting to drop. My perennials are up for the third time.