not sure when cows are due, what to look for

Discussion in 'Cattle' started by Angie, Dec 30, 2005.

  1. Angie

    Angie Well-Known Member

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    I bought some Angus cows with heifer calves on them early this fall that are supposed to have been bred back already and are supposed to drop this spring. He couldn't tell me when exctly they were bred or how old the calves were. What do i look for to know when they are about due? What will happen if the calves are not weaned by the time they have thier new calves? I am having trouble keeping them seperated to get them weaned.
     
  2. bretthunting

    bretthunting Well-Known Member

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    you first need to determine that the calves are old enough to wean (i would guess they should be by now) and get them weaned. once the cows dry up, then you will be able to tell when the cows are ready to calv again when they start coming into their milk again. they are real close when they start "to spring" meaning that their vagina starts getting larger and looser,should be able to tell by looking daily.
     

  3. Ken Scharabok

    Ken Scharabok In Remembrance

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    You absolutely need to wean those calves before the next one is born. Otherwise it will steal the colostrum and most of the milk. A cow may or may not kick it away.

    First calf born this year was a heifer out of my neighbor's bull (oops). First calving cow who didn't produce a lot of milk. She found the last calving cow would allow her to nurse from the back as long as her calf was at the side.

    Calves can be weaned as early as 200 pounds if you can provide them good forage and/or hay and perhaps some calf grower.
     
  4. Angie

    Angie Well-Known Member

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    I had some problems with my fence working out as i had planned and can't seperate them till the weather breaks. We tried to put the calves in pens in the barn but i don't think they had been penned before and went nuts to the point i thought they would hurt themselves. They have no shelter out in the field and maybe i am babying them to much but this is the only way they all can have access to the barn in bad weather. I should be able to seperate them when the new calves come but wasn't sure if that would be good enough.
     
  5. bretthunting

    bretthunting Well-Known Member

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    your calves will be a bit nervous for a week or ten days after weaning but the cows really need a break inbetween calves,it will allow them to put some weight back on and get back in good shape before the next calf.
     
  6. Celtic_Knot

    Celtic_Knot Celtic Heritage Farms

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    You could try those weaning crowns that go around the calf's nose if you can't separate them. I've never used them but it might be worth a try. For weaning we keep everyone close so that they can still touch nose to nose but that's it that might help keep them calm enough so that they don't break through your fences. I would also recomend getting those calves off as soon as possible otherwise you'll end up with bullied newborns that got no colostrum and were most likley stepped on.
    I don't know if you'll be able to see it on a shaggy angus but about the night or morning before they calve thier back will get swayed and their belly will drop, they will also get very relaxed and enlarged vulvas.