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Discussion Starter #1
Here are some pics of our garden. We are about 3 hours south of Montreal. The empty areas are where I've pulled the garlic. We've already gotten asparagus, strawberries, lettuce, radishes, spinach, some beans and cukes. Lots of green tomatoes; only one red cherry tomato so far!! (That smudge may mean I need to get a new camera!)








 

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very nice.
what variety are the green tomatoes? when did you plant them?
 

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moonwolf said:
very nice.
what variety are the green tomatoes? when did you plant them?
Thanks! Those are Rutgers and Early Harvest. I put the small (about 6" tall) transplants in near Memorial Day.
 

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Beautiful and impressive. I want to know how long the gardens have been in, and do you have trouble with the grass creeping up into the beds from underneath? I want to do grass paths between my beds too, but have been told it's too much work to contain the grass.
 

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naturewoman said:
Beautiful and impressive. I want to know how long the gardens have been in, and do you have trouble with the grass creeping up into the beds from underneath? I want to do grass paths between my beds too, but have been told it's too much work to contain the grass.
This is the 7th year that we've had the raised beds. Started all out with one level and then have been adding a level as we have the compost to put in.

I haven't had much of a problem with grass coming back into the beds. I always have to pull weeds before we plant and the occasional bit of grass at the edge. The only problem we've had is when something overflows the beds and kills the grass in the path!
 

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Thanks Cindy...that sounds manageable to me. I like the idea of building up each year as you have the compost to fill them...then it doesn't cost as much right away to build the boxes. I don't want to use pressure treated posts, so I would rather buy redwood, or find natural logs on my property, and just replace them as needed...but I don't have enough to do as many high beds as I'd like right away...so I will work on the "building them up as I go" method.
 

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WIHH - We're in Zone 4, just shy of Zone 3.

Naturewoman - wanted to tell you that we put the bed frames together using L brackets and mending plates. When we added a level, we used spikes to hold the levels together.
 

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What's a mending plate? I was thinking of screwing them to 2x2's in the inside corner if boards; or if round poles, drilling holes all the way through and dropping them down over pieces of rebar sunk in the soil. The rebar then also works as posts to hold my birdnetting fence to keep the chickens out, or to hold up frames for shade cloth or plastic coldframe tenting if required.

On second thought, I like the idea of using angle brackets with redwood boards, rather than 2x2's which would eventually rot out...unless you can get redwood 2x2's.
 

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naturewoman said:
What's a mending plate? I was thinking of screwing them to 2x2's in the inside corner if boards; or if round poles, drilling holes all the way through and dropping them down over pieces of rebar sunk in the soil. The rebar then also works as posts to hold my birdnetting fence to keep the chickens out, or to hold up frames for shade cloth or plastic coldframe tenting if required.

On second thought, I like the idea of using angle brackets with redwood boards, rather than 2x2's which would eventually rot out...unless you can get redwood 2x2's.
A mending plate is a flat piece of metal with holes in it. The timbers we used are 8' long. To get a 16' bed, we put two 8' together end to end with a mending plate to hold them together where they met. We put screws in the holes of the mending plates. The L brackets are like mending plates but bent into an L to go in the corners. We also put eye hooks at intervals along the top of the timbers. We use these and clothes pins to hold down bird netting when we first put in the plants and later to tie down our trellises.
 
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