North Dakota anyone?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by donsgal, Nov 10, 2006.

  1. donsgal

    donsgal Nohoa Homestead

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  2. spam4einstein

    spam4einstein Well-Known Member

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    Just a random question. Knowing nothing about cattle. How much could an average beef cattleman earn a year running cattle on 160 acres like this place?
     

  3. Bruce in NE

    Bruce in NE Well-Known Member

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    Try 1600 acres and you might be able to scrape by.
     
  4. fantasymaker

    fantasymaker Well-Known Member

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    Very pretty but seems very over priced
     
  5. Explorer

    Explorer Well-Known Member Supporter

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    That farm is located in central North Dakota. I grew up about 75 miles or so west of there on the Knife River. It is semi-arid with maybe 15-20 inches of moisture per year, that includes snow. I go back there every couple of years to see family. Pasture land in that area is $300-400 per acre, older buildings are really, really cheap.
     
  6. fantasymaker

    fantasymaker Well-Known Member

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    So its about a $100,000 place? Theres a reason ND is cheap but there are pretty places.
     
  7. tinknal

    tinknal Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Is any of the land suitable for tillage? The "Durham triangle" is in ND. A fairly valuable crop. If you were really interested in raising cattle here, I would call the county extension agent and find out what the typical 'AU' is for the area. An AU is an "animal unit" and it will tell you how many acres it takes to sustain a cow calf pair for a year.
     
  8. prairiecomforts

    prairiecomforts Well-Known Member

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    Well - I am from south central ND so I just felt like I had to say something!! North Dakota is a very pretty place, but we are in a very bad drought right now. The area I live in is minus 16 inches of rain fall. People who have been in cattle their whole lives are having to sell because there is nothing in the pasture to eat and hay (if you can find it) is through the roof!!! This place, although really nice, in my opinion is overpriced. But everything is going up. Pasture that maybe was $300-$400 per acre 15 years ago, is going for $1000 now. And that is the norm. It is just getting harder and harder for the smaller guys to hang on with dropping cattle/sheep prices and raising cost of land. Don't mean to put a damper on things - but it is just now it is. And I know it is not just here, but in a lot of places.
     
  9. nodak3

    nodak3 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    It is called a farmstead and not a farm for a reason. Not enough land to make a living.

    Explorer--ex-Killdeer here. Where did you go to school?
     
  10. goatlady

    goatlady Well-Known Member Supporter

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    In the plains of SOUTH Dakota is usually takes about 10 acres per cow/calf so applying that to that ND land you could run 16 pair IF you are lucky! And you have to hay at least 9 months a year in that country.
     
  11. Explorer

    Explorer Well-Known Member Supporter

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    A one room country school until the eighth grade and then Riverdale for one year of high school. After that my Dad came to his senses and moved us to western New Mexico.

    By the way, there is a reason so many people are FROM Noth Dakota.
     
  12. tinknal

    tinknal Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Well, that's a little extreme........lol. Actually there should be good grazing from may through Oct, if you use rotational grazing. You can raise your own hay.
     
  13. lonelytree

    lonelytree Guest

    I was in the AF in ND for 3 1/2 years out of Grand Forks. There are MANY old farmsteads going cheap. I helped remove all the plaster from a very large house near Larimore. It was bought for 25K with 5 acres and several outbuildings. As for living in ND permanently. NO WAY!!! I spent a day on a missile site at -118 degrees with wind chill. Even if you could get a job at one of the factories, it is too damn cold for too long. Farm animals are not safe either. Fuel bills and car repair bills make this one a poor choice.
    BTW - I live in Alaska.
     
  14. nodak3

    nodak3 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Explorer--this is too funny. I grew up in NM and moved to ND. Love the people, love ND, but between seasonal affective disorder, the grandkids being in CO, and the Rocky Mts. being down here, we left. If you are ever in south east NM, look up Loco Hills and you will find ND is not such a bad place to live.
     
  15. Explorer

    Explorer Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Been thru that area a few times, no reason to stop. You are completely correct, there are worse places than ND. :)
     
  16. Oceanrose

    Oceanrose Driftin' Away

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    South Dakota... :gossip: (ducking and running...)
     
  17. nodak3

    nodak3 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Uff-da--ya'll play nice and I'll make the krumkake if you bring da lutefisk. Or, maybe my homemade enchiladas will suit ya!
     
  18. Explorer

    Explorer Well-Known Member Supporter

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    That gives me an idea. I never could drown lutefisk in enough melted butter to make it taste barely eatable. Putting gobs of enchilada sauce and some hot peppers just might work. Maybe more than a few! :) Besides that will give my relatives something to talk about all winter if I can get them to taste it. After all, they think hot sauce is Heintz ketchup.
     
  19. fantasymaker

    fantasymaker Well-Known Member

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    get them started on green tobasco then work em up!
     
  20. Explorer

    Explorer Well-Known Member Supporter

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    My European relatives won't even eat bell peppers because they are too hot.
    :shrug: