Nigerians vs Bigger goats

Discussion in 'Goats' started by Unregistered-1427815803, Jul 31, 2004.

  1. I have been lurking on this site off and on for a few years now and am finally getting a place of my own,though more of a hobby farm than a homestead and I have a few ??? Imsurethis has been asked before but I can't find it, How do nigerians stack up to bigger goats in feed conversion? Also when getting 1/2 the milk from a goat whose initial cost is the same if not more does not add up either so are thier advantages to the smaller goats? I know my family will not drink all the milk provided by 2 larger breed does but I doubt it will go to waste.
     
  2. BrushBuster

    BrushBuster Well-Known Member

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    i don't milk my goats so i can't really help you there, but the dwarfs i've had have been regular houdini's. much much worse at getting out than any others i've had. but possibly 1 of the hardiest i've raised also. pygmies aren't alot bigger and very hardy also, and the ones i've had almost never escaped unless they followed the dwarfs out. i'm sure someone else here can answer your questions better than me. just figured i'ld throw that little bit of info in.
     

  3. tduerson

    tduerson Well-Known Member

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    I am new at all of this goat stuff, i ahve had my 3 goats (1 Boer Doe and 2 Pygmy Doe's). I do not milk either. I have mine for pets. i think they are both very pleasant animals. I ahve not had any problem with any of my 3 girls. They are all extremely freindly and easy to care for. If you ahve a good size pasture for them to graze on you might not even need to feed grain year around depending on where you live. Mine do not have a big pasture so they get about 1-1 1/2 lbs. of grain for hte Boer and 1/2-1 lb for each Pygmy. I hope this helps some. Also if you are wanting to milk a Pygmy you are not going to do any good. they really only produce enough to raise their kids. So therefor they are not good milkers.
     
  4. Laura Workman

    Laura Workman (formerly Laura Jensen) Supporter

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    I personally prefer the minis. That's why I have sold or am selling all of my Nigerians and standards (except the retired herd queen). Excellent milk, easy to milk, easy keepers, and easy to handle. Also, enough milk that I can get what I need (1/2 gallon to three quarts a day, depending on whether I want to make cheese :D ) by milking two does once a day and letting their kids have the rest. LOVE the minis!
     
  5. Trisha-MN

    Trisha-MN www.BilriteFarms.com

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    We have Nigies as well as full sized dairy goats. I wouldn't go as far as saying that 1 ND gives 1/2 the milk of a full sized goat, more like 1/3 the milk. Also, for the most part I find them to be harder to milk, but we do have a few ND that are fun to milk. However, with the full sized goats you may be swimmming in milk of you don't need a lot of milk a day.

    That said, ND do require less feed and are very hardy. They are a pain to fence when they are babies and also some of the young adults can be good at escaping fences too. We've found that the key to keeping them in is to make the kids pens escape proof. This takes some work but it is worth it. If they don't learn that they can get out of their pens as kids they seem more better about staying in as adults.

    The larger dairy breeds we've worked with seem to require a bit more maintence (hooves etc), eat more and aren't quite as apt to jump fences. They give more milk but require a feeding program that supports that. Depending on where you are located though, you may have a better outlet for extra kids with the full sized goats.

    Another option to consider are Kinder goats. LOL - everyone here knows I always mention Kinders but for an overall homestead goat, I think they really are worth considering.

    Trisha-MN
     
  6. DayBird

    DayBird Big Bird

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    I'm knew here too. What's a Kinder goat? We want two to keep each other company but don't want gallons of milk every day.
     
  7. Daybird I was wondering about the handle? Pigeons?
     
  8. Trisha-MN

    Trisha-MN www.BilriteFarms.com

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    Kinder goats are a fairly new breed, starting in the late 1980's. They origniated from a Nubian X Pygmy. Their milk is rich and great for cheese, being high in butterfat and protein. The Nubian adds lenght of leg for more room for the milk pail and the Pygmy adds the meat goat background creating a great dual purpose animal. Kinders are good milkers, hardy, playful and very easy going.

    We got Kinders when we first got into goats because they sounded like they were the best fit for what we wanted goats for. We still think they are. We do have other breeds simply because we wanted to try showing goats some but found out that overall, showing just isn't for us. And for an all around farmstead goat, Kinders are what we like.

    For more info check out: http://members.aol.com/KGBAssn/

    Hope that helps.
     
  9. Lisa A

    Lisa A Well-Known Member

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    I think it's a lot more work to milk two goats than to milk one, that's why
    we have full size goats; much of the year I just milk one of them (the other
    wasn't trained properly and dries herself off early). We just milk once a day
    to cut down on the work, too.
     
  10. Stacy Adams

    Stacy Adams Well-Known Member

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    I guess the quesiton is how much milk do you want? I have two does in milk, both nursing their own kids and so I only milk in the morning.. One doe will give about a gallon (6.5lbs) and the other less (about 2lbs).. if I wanted less milk, I wouldn't be milking that one at all, just let her raise meat kids, and if I wanted more, I'd be taking the kids off of them at night and get a full mornings milk.. but! I'm having fun making cheese and soap and I'm feeding an orphaned lamb.. who knew there were so many things to do with the stuff! :haha:
    That said, I would look at the different goats and see what pleases you to look at :cool: maybe visit a few different farms and visit their stock, maby milk a few to see which is easier to milk.. LOTS of options out there!!! have fun!
     
  11. DayBird

    DayBird Big Bird

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    No, I've actually never heard about the "daybird" in the pigeon world until I registered here. I've received over 20 PMs asking me about that. Wow, perhaps I should get some pigeons. :)
    Actually, our last name is "Day" and we breed birds. All kinds of birds. Chickens, turkeys, peafowl, geese, parrots, cockatiels, parakeets, exotic softbills. All kinds of birds.

    We want a goat when we move. I can no longer drink cows' milk but can't afford storebought goats' milk. If I only had one good dairy goat, would she be lonely? Would a llama keep her company?
     
  12. Night Owl

    Night Owl Active Member

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    Hi Daybird, I just thought you were the opposite of me, a night owl.
    I have all kinds of goats, alpine, nigerian, pygmy, nubian, boerX. I love them all.
    First I'd say, find goats you like. My DH loves our Oberhasli buck, I like nubians and pygmies.
    No matter what kind of goat you get, I strongly recommend non-step horse fence. Then the escaping isn't such an issue.
    I really believe you have to have two goats. They need each other. But, with the smaller breeds, like pygmy and kinder, they are not seasonal breeders. So, you could have them bred at opposite seasons and then you'd only milk one goat, half a year each. The true dairy breeds may only give you a 4 month spread between kidding.
    Another thought is, have one dairy goat and one pygmy. All mine get along fine. You can breed the pygmy to kid when your dairy goat is resting.
    There are lots of ways to do it.
    My goats really don't eat much at all, compared to my cows! I hardly even consider the cost of feed for them.
    Best of luck,
    Tina
     
  13. outofmire

    outofmire Well-Known Member

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    Let me start by saying that ours are kids still, but I spent quite a bit of time asking the same questions you are.

    To me the 2 advantages of nigerian dwarves that can outweigh their disadvantages (for us) are:

    1) Higher butterfat. You can get comparable butterfat from pygmies, but since they are raised to be pet quality and not livestock....I've been reluctant to drink their milk since we want raw milk. Also, you can get good butterfat from kinders. The higher butterfat will give you more cheese and butter for the same amount of milk.

    2) Cheaper to feed and easier to keep a dwarf buck than a full size goat.

    Also, nigerians can milk 1/2 the full sized. 1/2 gallon is not unheard of at all, especially if you look for quality goats with a lot of dairy in their history.
    1/2 the feed for 1/2 the milk. It does mean milking twice as many goats. But if you plan to make cheese then you are getting sometimes twice as much as you would from the full size goats for the same amount of feed.

    We plan to try several breeds that we are interested in and keep a nigerian buck for breeding until we decide which one(s) we like the best.
     
  14. DayBird

    DayBird Big Bird

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    I don't know why it never occured to me that we "could" keep different breeds. We've had bad experiences with goats in the past due to neighborhood children and dogs so it's going to take alot for us to jump in again without lots and lots of research. We don't need large quantities of milk but enough for the boys breakfast cereal and for me to have with my peanut butter and jelly sandwiches. It seems that we're all lactose intolerant and cows milk gives us fits (and lots of very rude bodily noises). My doctor and the boys pediatrician have both said that goat's milk wouldn't give us any trouble. We're trying to buy goats milk from the grocery store just for the kids cereal but we can't afford to keep doing that much longer.

    We're trying to buy 3 acres to move to and will need to fence it. Will the cheaper cattle field fencing be good or should we use the 2 inch by 4 inch dog wire? How much area should we fence for two goats? I'd like to have at least two different yards for them so we could switch them up. I'm thinking that we will go with Nigerians and get at least two does and maybe even possibly a billy. I think good investments are a wise decision and purebred baby Nigerians are currently selling for quite a bit. Does this sound like a wise investment to you?
     
  15. dancinggoatgirl

    dancinggoatgirl Member

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    That sounds like a very good idea! I bought a Nigerian buck but have yet to buy a doe. I mostly raise grade nubians yet, I'm trying Nubian and Nigerian crosses this year. I might even breed the Nigerian to my new Saanen doe. Though next year I plan to buy a purebred Nubian buck. The lady who I was getting stud made some requirements that the does had to have. I can't aford three health papers just for breeding...... (ther are some does that I don't want bred to the Nigerian.) But, I might have to get them if I can't find a Nubian around..

    good luck!

    Linda
     
  16. Hank - Narita

    Hank - Narita Well-Known Member

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    We have 2 alpines that we milk and are keeping a doe from the one. We also keep our own buck. Never owned the smaller ones so can't compare them.
     
  17. BrushBuster

    BrushBuster Well-Known Member

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    around here they don't bring much (haven't checked the prices on registered recently) but the kids will bring as much or more as the adults here. i never worry to much about the price of a paticular adult (within reason) because i figure if i have no bad luck much, the kids will more than pay for the adult in time even if i get considerably less than i paid when selling the adult.
     
  18. We currently have 2 Nigerian does in milk. This is the first season for both of them and for the first few months we got close to a gallon a day. That has tapered off to a little over 2 quarts a day now but that has been consistant. A friend has a Nubian and we compared the butterfat and taste and the Nigerians' was creamier and tastier.
    I researched and got hte best blood lines I could afford and that paid off for me this year (our first) because of the two does we had bred one dropped triplets and one a single and I got 900.00 for the four kids.
    The Nigerians have been easy for my children to help care for because of their size and ours are very friendly but they do get handled a lot.
    The down side is that you nearly have to get on your belly to milk sometimes...
    I guess the advice you get will depend on what the people you talk to prefer!
     
  19. fleur

    fleur New Member

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    Where did you get your Nigerian does?
     
  20. eggladyj

    eggladyj Well-Known Member

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    I agree with most all the advice you've been given, and it really comes down to what you want to look at every day! The only thing I disagree with is you can milk Pygmys and they do give a fair amount of milk! We started out in goats with two Pygmy does, got them bred and waited until the babies were about a month old to milk them. The milk is very rich and sweet, yes it's not nearly as much as you would get from a dairy goat but it all depends on the goat. One of ours has a very nice udder with large enough teats that it is very easy to milk her and she gave milk forever, about 10 1/2 months! I only milked her once a day and would get 3-4 cups per milking. Just like looking for a good dairy goat it is important to look at the udder and teat and to ask/check on her mothers milking ability before buying. If you are considering Pygmys and want more info on their milking abilities check out this site:
    http://kinne.net/index.html
    Good luck on your goat info hunting!

    Jeannine