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Discussion Starter #1
One of our Nigerian bucks is soooo into his job -- just like a buck should be. The other two however . . . I want to post the facepalm smiley but my computer's malfunctioning. They just don't seem to understand that what they're supposed to do is mount the doe as many times as possible, and to actually do the job every time. Although we haven't actually tested it on Toby for a year . . . anyway, Colonel is 2 1/2. He acts like the biggest buck around until you give him a girl. Then, yes, he'll mount the doe . . . but beware, he won't actually stick his 'thing' (that's literally what we call it here) out except for maybe once or twice. And he'll lose interest -- fast. So good luck actually getting a doe bred with him! Hazel is hopefully bred to him to kid in early March -- he did do the job once while we were watching, and we left them overnight.
And Toby? Last year, he just stood around, and didn't mount even ONCE. Not kidding. I guess he was only 3-5 months old, but he seemed perfectly capable when we had to separate him at eight weeks old! Yeah, by then he could both stick his thing out AND mounted all the time -- he couldn't do both at the same time though.
Another thing, sort of off topic -- I can't imagine Bella being bred this year, although she was born on April fools day (no kidding! Pun intended.) So she's seven months old . . . 25 pounds, max. The kids would be half as big as her! Even five months later, she'd still only be breeding weight, tops. For Nigerian dwarfs, you're generally supposed to wait to breed until they're forty pounds. Ours only get to 50-60 fully grown, but we do still wait until 40, which would be their second year.
 

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What are your Nigerian lines? I know you've posted before that your goats are smaller than most average Nigerians. Do you use a coccidiosis prevention, and have you done fecals to be sure that it is working? What is your protocol? Nigerian bucks, at least the ones that I have been around, seem to generally get the breeding thing down very early. I have a June buckling that has bred and settled most if not all the does I bred him to in early-mid October.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
We didn't do coccidiosis treatment with Toby because he grew like a weed and never had poop problems. Colonel the same. Arthur did though, so he got the cocci treatment. We're going to deworm our goats really soon, though. Not sure about their lines.
 

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You should read up on coccidiosis and prevention. It is very important for kid growth and one of the biggest signs of a coccidia problem is poor growth. I think a buck could be reluctant to breed if they had parasite problems as a kid (or any other nutritional problem...and yeah, a parasite problem (coccidiosis, for example) causes a nutrition problem). There are definitely bucks too that just don't breed their first year...I just haven't had them yet. ;) I'm sure it's coming though.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
This year we did full cocci prevention for all our kids. We only got goats in 2012 for the first time, so technically we're new to goats although it feels like we've had them forever! Live and learn . . .
 

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They just don't seem to understand that what they're supposed to do is mount the doe as many times as possible, and to actually do the job every time.
That could be genetics. I had - notice I said "had" - a buck that literally ran to the corner and freaked out when I introduced him to the girls. He finally got the job done, but the girls were 3 or 4 months late kidding. Another buck didn't settle a single doe. Both of them were well over a year old, and both of them bought a one way ticket to the sale barn with a big red X on their side.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Yes on the minerals (we've been slacking off a bit lately, but usually we try to give them loose minerals once a day), yes on the copper, not sure on the BOSE. I'm not sure why that would affect only two out of three bucks though, and it's been going on for a year, like I said. Arthur has had three sets (litters?) of kids, seven kids total. Arthur has failed three times, but twice the does weren't in heat. Once it just didn't take, but he did his best. Colonel has failed twice, both times not even trying, or trying so little it doesn't count. Hopeful that he figured it out this time though -- I want babies! I find now that if I go a couple months without new goat kids, I feel deprived of their sweetness.
The other thing is that Colonel and Toby (the ones not as interested) were dam raised, whereas Arthur was bottle fed. It's strange though -- wouldn't bottle kids be LESS likely to figure it out, not more?
 

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Goats really need free choice mineral available because their needs are going to vary according to different times and different circumstances. Can I ask why you don't provide mineral free choice? BOSE is selenium and that is important to fertility, as well as other things such as preventing white muscle disease. Conversely, selenium can be toxic if given when it isn't needed. Have you checked with your extension office or vet to determine if you live in a selenium deficient area? If not, you might want to do that. If your genetics are what they should be, it won't make a difference whether a buck was dam raised or bottle raised.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Yes, they are up to date on selenium. We used to give them free choice minerals, but now we have a ewe living with our does and goat minerals are toxic to sheep. I guess we could still give free choice to the bucks though. What would be a good container that wouldn't spill? They always knock over containers immediately.
 
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