Newspaper article from 1917

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Pigeon Lady, Nov 18, 2005.

  1. Pigeon Lady

    Pigeon Lady Well-Known Member Supporter

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  2. Paranoid

    Paranoid Homebrewed Happiness

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    they spelled milk cows "milch cows" and used the word "scrious."

    wow, how things have changed hehe.
     

  3. pickapeppa

    pickapeppa Well-Known Member

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    Thanks pigeonlady. That was such an interesting read. So how many acres do you gather were needed for everything mentioned there? I would have no idea for lack of experience raising grains and hay for livestock. Sounds like an awful lot of work.
     
  4. Pony

    Pony Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Around here, there are still some old German dairy farmers who say "milch cow."

    I looked for the word "scrious" and realized that it's "sErious" -- the old print wasn't very clear.

    Pony!
     
  5. Fire-Man

    Fire-Man Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Some people Mis-Spell words some time and are not Perfect. Randy
     
  6. HiouchiDump

    HiouchiDump Well-Known Member

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    "scrious" is actually "serious" - the "e" is just worn so it looks like a "c". ;)

    The word "milch" is not actually a different spelling of "milk", but is a different word that means something like "a milk-producing animal".
     
  7. Explorer

    Explorer Well-Known Member Supporter

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    As I recall from my history lessons, one-half to two-thirds of the grain crops were used to maintain the draft animals. Remember, this was before wide scale farm mechanization that happened in the 20' and 30's. My family generally farmed about 160 acres in the Dakotas' with maybe forty acres for a cash crop. The rest was pasture and grain with maybe 3-4 acres for the farmstead.
     
  8. Pigeon Lady

    Pigeon Lady Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Yes, I was wondering how much land you would need to be able to do all that. Not just that but the type of land. I know the families down here in our little "holler" between the mountains couldn't do it all. But they sure did a lot.

    Here's an article written by an old gentleman who grew up down the road here. He tells of how they lived back in the '30's. He stopped by right out of the blue with his 90 year old sister last week and we had a real nice visit. He's so interesting to talk to and I picked his brains on a lot of stuff. I'll ask him how much land his family had.

    He has another piece on the net too. I'll try to find it.

    http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~barbs/memev.html

    P
     
  9. Pigeon Lady

    Pigeon Lady Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Ok, here it is.

    http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~barbs/Edgar_Vest_Autobiography.html

    He talks a lot about the sounds around here. Sound bounces around all over the place. You never know where it's coming from. Many times I'm in the barn and I hear voices. I go out to see who it is and no one's there. The first time it happened I walked all the way back to the house and down the drive to see who'd stopped by. It turned out to be our neighbors down and across the road sitting on their porch quietly talking!

    P
     
  10. LenaSorry

    LenaSorry Member

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    From: http://www.m-w.com/

    milch
    One entry found for milch.


    Main Entry: milch
    Pronunciation: 'milk, 'milch, 'milks
    Function: adjective
    Etymology: Middle English milche, from Old English -milce; akin to Old English melcan to milk -- more at EMULSION
    : MILK

    :nerd: