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SO many questions in my head .... trying to understand setts and wpi 's ...

I figured there's more beginners here, so maybe my questions can help others as well !

1. I have some Fisherman's Wool .... wrapped it around a ruler and got 8 wraps in an inch ... does that mean my WPI is 4 ??? ( you divide the number by 2 ? )

2. If correct, will it work in my 8 dent reed ? ( probably "depends", right ? ! ) ugh !

Here is what I have figured so far ..... does this look right so far ?

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I'm going to suggest that you won't have to factor in 30" of loom waste for a rigid heddle loom as your 10" of fringe is considered part of that "waste". With a rigid heddle loom you can figure maybe 10" or so for warp waste. That's a total of 20" for waste.

I usually make my scarves 10" wide and approximately 110" long on the loom After wet finishing, I usually end up with approximately 72" of woven length, not counting 4-6" of fringe on each end. I use natural fibers and usually have about 2" of shrink for the warp. I also usually cut off about 2" on each fringe end to get to the 4-6" length I want. I never have 30" of waste on my rh loom.

All this depends on the type of yarn you are using. Acrylics, and other manmade fibers, will have little to no shrinkage during the wet finishing. All projects have some drawin, which is usually included as shrinkage. kkbinco is right, usually 10% is the standard unless you have tested a fiber and know for sure how it finishes.

As for the specifics of your project, how wide is your loom? (I think you've said before but I forget). You want a 22" finished project so I am guessing your loom is at least 24".

eta: I had my mil make an afghan for me out of fisherman's wool in the brown and creme. I washed it in hot water and it shrank at least 50% and it turned out a lot smaller than I hoped. I wanted it to felt, just not as small as it did.
 

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4 shaft loom ..... reed is 22" ..... duh, just dawned on me .... final project CANT be 22" if you need extra for shrinkage !!

On the Fishermans, I noticed one color is NOT 100% wool .... didnt know ! Good info that it shrinks up alot in hot water !
 

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I had forgotten you got that 4 harness table loom, so yes, 30" is a good guess for yarn waste. But, you still count the fringe in that 30". If you learn to use a supplement warp you will have even less yarn waste. That's a good thing when you want to use super nice or really expensive yarn that you don't want to have to cut off as waste.

It's also good to make sure both your warp and weft yarn will finish about the same after wet finishing. You don't want to use a yarn that has 50% shrinkage with one that has 10% shrinkage unless you are making a collapse fabric or doing something else that needs that puckering look.
 

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ohhhhh .... good thought about that pucker factor FB !!! Some of the Fishermans Yarn is 100% wool and some is 79 % wool ... 13% acrylic and 9% rayon ....
 

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1. I have some Fisherman's Wool .... wrapped it around a ruler and got 8 wraps in an inch ... does that mean my WPI is 4 ??? ( you divide the number by 2 ? )
I don't think the number is divided by two, I think the WPI is the WPI. So I'm thinking more than likely it's 8.
 

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Yes, the WPI is divided by two to find the maximum sett, this allows room for the weft to fit between warp ends. This is for plain weave, you would divide by less for twills and the like since you skip over some ends when weaving.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Yes, the WPI is divided by two to find the maximum sett, this allows room for the weft to fit between warp ends. This is for plain weave, you would divide by less for twills and the like since you skip over some ends when weaving.


...always a variable :hair ....... so if Im wanting to do a Herringbone ( Point twill ) do I need a different sett number ?!?!
 

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Kas, it's not. Really.

You'll notice that the fewer yards per pound (ypp) the lower the sett number. Just means that the thicker the yarn the fewer ypp and the fewer wraps per inch (wpi). So if you have a really bulky knitting or crochet yarn, and you wrap it around a 12" ruler, you'll only get 4-5 wraps until you've reached 1" on the ruler. If you are using something like crochet or sewing thread you'll be wrapping 20, 50, 100, etc., just to get that same 1" of wrap around the ruler. Divide that number by 2 - because you have yarn on both the front AND back of the ruler - and that is your Sett, or wraps per inch (wpi).

Do a search for Weaving Terms or Weaving Glossary. There are many different pages with definitions.

The Glimakra page is very good http://glimakrausa.com/glossary/

and under "Warping Terms" has this simple definition for

Sett: The number of warp threads per inch.

From this link http://www.warpedforgood.com/weaving-glossary/

Sett: The number of warp ends per measuring unit–inches or centimeters, also known as EPI or EPC. The sett is the density of warp threads per inch; as such, it is one of the key factors for producing fabric that works as designed for a specific use.


I also highly recommend these two books

The New Handbook of Timesaving Tables for Weavers Spinners and Dyers
by Bettie G. Roth & Chris Schultz - found here

http://www.bookfinder.com/search/?author=roth&title=handbook+timesaving+tables&lang=en&isbn=&submitBtn=Search&new_used=*&destination=us¤cy=USD&mode=basic&st=sr&ac=qr

The first, and last, link on that page will give you the least expensive options for purchase.

and

The Weaver's Companion
from Handwoven Magazine found here

http://www.bookfinder.com/search/?keywords=9781883010812&new_used=*&lang=en&st=sh&ac=qr&submit=


I have the 2nd edition, 5th printing of the first book. It's only 41 pages, but I use it all the time. The book from Handwoven is nice, and has most of the same things. I do think I like the Roth book best. Not sure why but maybe because it feels more complete for what it is - and maybe that's because it also touches on spinning and dyeing and the Handwoven one doesn't. But really, I can't recommend one over the other because I do use them both.

Now I'm off to get ready for my dyeing play date.
 

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Woo-hoo! Great advice and links people. Thanks. Got some expert weavers here! Miz Mary, you're in good hands! I didn't know you divide the wpi by 2! LOL :teehee:

I'm just pluggin' along at the krokbragd. Makin it up as I go along. I'll post some pics when I get a little further.

Hey SPINNERS! Found this 'must have' item for you all. :D

http://www.woolery.com/store/pc/Spi...s-Most-Popular-Wheels-p13053.htm#.VEkPvhZHZFt
 

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Discussion Starter #18
FANTASTIC info --- you guys are so helpful !!! Today I am going to make a raddle , but not sure if its used in both FTB and BTF warping ?!?!

Cant wait for your pics Osiris !
 

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^5 Miz Mary! I've made 2 raddles. One with finishing nails and the other with dowels. You could use cotter pins if you want.
First one I put the nails in at 1 inch spacing. That one I sold with the table loom.
The second one I put dowels in at 1/2 inch spacing. Works fine. Nothing is cut in stone except like kkbinco said, you use it to spread the warp - but generally into 1 inch groups. Those groups are created in the counting cross while winding the warp. (opposite end of the threading cross)
 

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