New to this cattle thing.

Discussion in 'Cattle' started by wkyongae, Mar 27, 2006.

  1. wkyongae

    wkyongae Active Member

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    Hi, we're new to this cattle thing and looking for all the advice we can get. Got ourselves 2 cows 1 alittle Holsteen and mostly Angus (#33). The other is Herford (#80). Both bred to Red Angus. #33 due in July and #80 due in Sept. They are 6 years old. My qustion is how many more years do they have in them. And would AI be a good way to go to begin to build a herd from this mix that we have. In case you are wondering these are what we could afford and the guy we got them from had no calving problems which was our largest concern as we have never been there. And he said he had no problems getting them bred. So what do ya all think?
     
  2. JeffNY

    JeffNY Seeking Type

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    First off, 6 years is still young in the beef world. Beef cattle can live to a nice ripe old age, mainly because they aren't under much stress (milking, etc), only calving and that isn't much stress. We have a beef cow, she is about 11 or so, we also had a Jersey that was her age wayy back about 9 years ago (she died then). That Jersey was not in that great of shape, compared to this beef cow. The neighbor has several beef cows that are into their teens, and are as healthy as the younger ones.

    AI works, however sometimes getting a bull to do the breeding, even if it is 2 can save some time. Building a beef herd is incredibly easy, especially with a bull. Going the AI route requires your observation, and the animal will only get bred because you make the call. The bull is there 24/7. Once the bull is done breeding them, either sell him, or keep in one more year to breed again, then get rid of him to avoid imbreeding. A hereford bull would be the best choice, they are laid back, and are standoff-ish. As tempting as it may be, do not tame him, a bull is not a pet, and there is a line that is drawn in the sand. This line is respect, if the bull sees you as a friend, he will not respect you, and that is not good. Any of the bulls we have, we never tamed them down, they were easy to work around, but they would go the opposite way if you got too close. Either way, here is how you weigh it. AI, don't have to feed an extra mouth, bulls eat more than cows. However you have to be there. With a bull, it is hands free, but you have to feed something extra.


    Jeff
     

  3. wkyongae

    wkyongae Active Member

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    Thank you, that is good knowledge to know. We are so looking forward to getting this started. And I am glad they live a long life as this will work for us. Is $50 too high for bull rental?
     
  4. Christiaan

    Christiaan Dutch Highlands Farm

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    $50!?!?!?!?!? Wow, I wish I could get my cow bred for that! My cow goes up to her old ranch to rendezvous with the bull. Costs me $125 for the bull plus hauling, hoof trim, and hay if its a dry summer. Go for it.
     
  5. wkyongae

    wkyongae Active Member

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    I had no idea because the guy we got these cows from has a really nice Herford bull. He says the bull travels well. Haven't worked out the travel arrangments yet. He also has an Angus bull but we would have to take our cows to him. (He's a bit mean and just wants left alone.) Is this advisable?
     
  6. JeffNY

    JeffNY Seeking Type

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    A black hide will bring more an an auction over a red hide. Angus do have a different attitude, our Angus bull calf (yearling next month), has a bit of an attitude. I knew this before getting him. The hereford bull at your place would allow you to observe them. Taking the animals somewhere else I wouldn't do, only because you can't keep an eye on them. So yes $50 is a good price, consider this. How much would it cost you to AI them? Figure on the AI tech visit cost, and then the semen cost, and what if they didn't breed the first time? It can add up over $50 easily, so yes $50 is good.


    Jeff
     
  7. wkyongae

    wkyongae Active Member

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    Thank you for the advise. How long after they calf do they come into heat?
     
  8. JeffNY

    JeffNY Seeking Type

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    Depends, but typically 60-100 days. Here I have noticed those who calved dont come into heat untill 2-3 months after they have calved.


    Jeff
     
  9. wkyongae

    wkyongae Active Member

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    Thank you I had read somewhere 45 days but wasn't sure. Anyhow checked them tonight they look great. #33 is just starting to bag a little so I guess this would be about right with a july due date. We are so looking forward to our 1st calf.
     
  10. JeffNY

    JeffNY Seeking Type

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    Yes 45 days is possible, however they might not show a strong sign, or they might not show much sign with a calf next to them. I have found with a calf, it seems to delay it some.


    Jeff
     
  11. Christina R.

    Christina R. Well-Known Member

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    I can concur with this. After Corabelle's first calf, she seemed to go into heat 3 weeks after and I could see the signs clearly. After this last calf, she didn't go into heat right away and when she finally did, I couldn't see the signs as clearly (the calf is still with her). Her last heat (with the calf about 4 1/2 months old was the first time I could tell without a doubt that she was in heat.
     
  12. wkyongae

    wkyongae Active Member

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    Signs? What signs??? What should I be looking for?
     
  13. Jennifer L.

    Jennifer L. Well-Known Member Supporter

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    My neighbor has Angus and has several cows in their mid 20's. He's been selling them off the last few years, but because of age related problems, not because they haven't had calves. One cow that is a family pet (was always friendly even as a young cow and led their young son back to the father after an accident that left the son blind for several days) has a calf every other year.

    Jennifer
     
  14. wkyongae

    wkyongae Active Member

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    wow, I never knew in all my years of hauling cattle (bull rack) that catle could be so freindly. Although it has been many years since I pulled a bull rack. Was raised on a chicken and hog farm.