new to the board wanna move away

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by dutchman, Sep 15, 2005.

  1. dutchman

    dutchman Member

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    Seattle area
    Sorry this question might have been asked a million times by now....but I am new here.

    We live in a community right now, but I want to get away from the city live and move to the country, big piece of land, animals stuff like that.... but I have never done that before, where would I start..... :confused:

    We are looking at some land (government claim land) and might move to that build or mobile home. but then what do you guys think I should do before we make this step? Right now we live near Seattle, WA and want to move to the Auburn, Kent area where there is still land availible,........

    Thanks for the help.

    Andre
     
  2. pcdreams

    pcdreams Well-Known Member

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    Missouri, Springfield
    first of all the homestead act is gone.. IE no more free land.

    If you're talking about mining claims: be careful. Know that there are restrictions as to what you can do.

    that aside you need to find out climate, job market, etc to decide where you want to buy your land.

    There are millions of ways to get infor on how to do homesteading things but I think you may have stumbled onto the best site to get answers.

    Disclaimer: Homesteading can become addictive :)
     

  3. thedonkeyman

    thedonkeyman Well-Known Member

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    If you can't get along with two legged animals then you will want to investagate the four legged kind, and the people who are there before you. I just was looking at another thread about a lady who has a problem with her neighbor coming over ? Then there is the COUGAR. OH, the people from the city who come out and TRESS PASS. SO country living has PROBLEMS. BUT, they can be delt with. A LOCKED GATE and GOOD FENCE. Motion lights. Starnge, you would think people would RESPECT your way of life.....NO they will come up and OPEN the GATE and come on in. There are some people who live in the country who are not the ones you want as neighbors. WE have some next door to us, real bad people , one came over and started to pound me, just because his wife wanted her husband to stay home and not give away their Pine Needles. But that's another story. Investgate wind power, go to: hydrogenappliances.com/ WIND MILLS, Water Wheels. GEO DOMES and SOLAR. There is Solar powered electric Fence charger. And last but not least don't forget DONKEYS, as we are the American DONKEY Association. ADA CEO the donkeyman
     
  4. Maura

    Maura Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Paint a picture of what you really want. Flower gardens? Vegetable gardens? Cash crop? Sheep, poultry, or dairy cows? Each is going to require different soil types, drainage, etc. I'd love to own the forty acres behind us, but I don't. We have six acres because that is all we could afford. If we had bought the land planning to earn a living off of it, we could, but not with conventional crops. Read, read, read. Joel Salatin books to start you off, but also anything relating to raising the animals you want to keep, or crops you'd like to grow. Approach the situation like a business so you don't get in too far over your head.
     
  5. dutchman

    dutchman Member

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    Sep 15, 2005
    Location:
    Seattle area

    Right now, we are looking for vegetable garden for home use (know alot about that), maybe some Alpacas for cash, some chickens, etc... smalll farm.

    We bought our current house 3 years ago, we moved from our 5 acre lot to the city (DUMB I KNOW)... we lived next to my in laws and that didnt work out to good.
    Thanks for the help......
     
  6. turtlehead

    turtlehead Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Central WV
    Hey Dutchman, and welcome to the forums. You're already off to a good start by having found this place.

    I'm a small town and city gal who's recently moved to the country (been here only a month). I am also fairly new to this site.

    You've gotten some good advice so far, when you were told to think about what your idea of homesteading entails. No point in living in the desert if you envision hydro power, a well house, and springs on your land. No point in searching through Appalachia for property that will do real well with solar and wind power. Also important is how you plan to make your living, and for some folks other things are important, like being near a good medical facility, or near elderly parents.

    As you daydream, research your dreams to see if they are feasible or not. I imagined horses, cows, and baling hay until I saw the price of tractors, balers, and *flat land*. :eek: Now I'm imagining chickens, hogs, and maybe goats. ;)

    Another thing to do is practice "homesteading" where you are. You're already doing that with your garden. Do you can or freeze your produce? Do you make your own bread? Do you fix broken things yourself or do you call a repair guy? Kind of start changing your mindset, even while you're in the 'burbs.

    Finally, read everything you can get your hands on. Subscribe to some magazines, order some books, hang out on forums related to your interests.
     
  7. Terri

    Terri Singletree & Weight Loss & Permaculture Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    Kansas
    For entertainment purposes only....
    http://www.forks-wa-real-estate.com/search_properties.htm

    I know, it's the wrong area, and it is a single wide. But, it DOES get ones imagination going!

    The first thing is, finances. Figure out how little you can live on, and try it out for a few months. Put any unused money in the bank.

    That will teach you the minimum that you can settle for income-wise. If you find a place you like and it will cut the money to below the minimum you can live on, pass it by. BUT, if you find a good place that you can afford, you will know it. AND, if you find a place that is BELOW what you can afford, then you can say that you will have $X a month to invest in fences and what-not.

    The unused money in the bank can go towards the down payment if you need it.

    Good luck!
     
  8. Quint

    Quint Well-Known Member

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    Alpacas for cash. There's where you're gonna have your first problem. The cash flow with alpacas usually works in the opposite way you're thinking of. At least that is the way it has worked for everyone I know of that owns them.

    More or less an Amway style pyramid scheme for farmers. Just like the ostriches, the emus, the llamas.....
     
  9. katlupe

    katlupe Off-The-Grid Homesteader Supporter

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    Upstate NY
    Welcome to the forum, dutchman. And welcome to the lifestyle of homesteading. I would recommend going to the library and reading every book you can on homesteading, gardening, livestock, building and frugal living. Subscribe to some magazines such as Countryside, Backwoods Home Magazine and even Mother Earth News.

    It took us 4 years to find our perfect property - it's not perfect by a longshot. But it suits us. We had a list of things we wanted in our property and it had some of things and didn't have others. We compromised.

    Whatever you get, it will take work, work and more work. But it is such a satisifying lifestyle. One thing I have discovered is making friends with others who are also into homesteading helps alot. It keeps you focused on what your goal is. I always made lists of what we wanted, what tools we needed, what I needed to learn to do or make, etc. And then you can cross stuff off and add more.

    Welcome again!
    katlupe
     
  10. campergirl

    campergirl Member

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    Oct 23, 2004
    Location:
    seattle
    I live in the Burien area of Seattle. I don't understand why anyone would want to buy land in Kent or Auburn area. Both areas have high gang activity. I bought 10 acres in Moses Lk washington and it is only 2 hrs away. Whenever I can get away, I go and do some work on the land so one day I can retire there. Easteren wa has alot of nice land still available.
     
  11. Christiaan

    Christiaan Dutch Highlands Farm

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    Location:
    Along the Stillaquamish, Washington
    I also can't see why you would go for Auburn or Kent, but for different reasons. That whole area is developing fast even with supposed farm preservation. Then there is the whole controversy of limiting agricultural use for environmental protection in King county. Personally, I don't think there is any sustainable farm land left in King county except for near Skykomish.
    Start looking at land around where you want to be and you'll see how you will very shortly be priced and zoned out of the area.
    Pierce, Thurston or Snohomish counties have pretty much the same problems except they have more remote areas still available.
    Alpacas are not a sustainable money maker. When you see asking prices of $6000 to $36000 dollars for what are essentially pets you know you're talking pyramid scheme. I am getting two alpacas tomorrow, freebies, and that's about what they are worth.
     
  12. Hank - Narita

    Hank - Narita Well-Known Member

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    We found our property in the country and decided on a MH. Since we needed instant housing it seemed like a good idea. WRONG! Whatever you do don't get a mobile home. Have a stick built home constructed; something with no structural problems and it will last. Also heating and cooling are better. Good luck. We love our property.
     
  13. mrglock27

    mrglock27 Well-Known Member

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    Dec 8, 2003
    Location:
    Yelm, WA
    Hi, come down to Yelm. it's about 45 miles south of auburn. My wife and I got 5 acres and got a 2,776 sq ft house built by highline homes. property=$53,000 house with tax=$120,000, stick built, 5 bdrm. 2.5 bth. 2 car garage.well $7,000 septic $7,000 giant wood stove and marble hearth installed $5000. and some misc. stuff, all together $220,000. Or there is a highline home, brand new stick built 2,320 sq ft. rambler on 5 acres out here in yelm for $320,000, been on the market for 3 or 4 months. If you buy the raw land and get the house built it will take about 8 or 9 months for the whole process if your getting a loan. 4 months to build the house. We bought our land about 3 years ago. now 5 acres lots are about $65,000 and 10acres $89,000.
     
  14. mrglock27

    mrglock27 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
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    Location:
    Yelm, WA
    If you go to Okanogan county in eastern WA you can get heavily wooded acreage for $1000 to $1,500 an acre or less. My friend just bought another 20 acres over there by molson, WA for $17,000.
     
  15. Terri

    Terri Singletree & Weight Loss & Permaculture Moderator Staff Member Supporter

    Messages:
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    May 10, 2002
    Location:
    Kansas
    Try here.
    http://www.unitedcountry.com/ucform...earch_Found_Properties.Asp?SID=17465867&Lcnt=

    Mind, when they have a acreage for only $5000, you KNOW that it is in the middle of nowhere, but it still makes for a good read.

    This is nice:




    PRIVATE GETAWAY

    Key Features

    9.6 ACRES
    RECREATIONAL GETAWAY
    MOSTLY FLAT
    SEASONAL PONDS
    PRIVATE



    Pictures

    (Click to See Full Size)


    See More Pictures

    Description

    9.6 acres that will take you away from the hustle and bustle of busy city life! Mostly flat land with the posibility of a seasonal pond. Asking $5000.
    Property No.: 46036-07980 Price: $5,000.00

    Estimated Mortgage Payment: Click here to calculate an "estimated" mortgage payment:

    Disclaimer: All information deemed reliable but not guaranteed and should be independently verified. All properties are subject to prior sale, change or withdrawal. Neither listing broker(s) nor United Country Real Estate shall be responsible for any typographical errors, misinformation, misprints and shall be held totally harmless.

    This Property is Offered By:


    United Country - Lake Roosevelt Realty Inc.
    PO BOX 689
    DAVENPORT WA 99122
    Phone(s): (509) 725-2883
    Fax: (509) 725-2696
    Need More Information? E-Mail Us!
    Go to Our Home Page


    ................................
    Dutchman, it took me a few years to find an affordable property with in commute distance. I DID find one, I bought 5.5 acres just 20 minutes away, but it took quite a bit of searching.