New to Nubians

Discussion in 'Goats' started by heidith, Aug 12, 2005.

  1. heidith

    heidith Well-Known Member

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    Hi there,
    I have an opportunity to buy two Nubian does; both have kidded, have papers and are coming from a very nice farm in my area. The owner wants $150 for each. One was born in 1999, the other is two years old. Let's assume for a moment that each goat is in excellent health, giving 1 gallon of milk each day during the height of her season and has been treated very well. I believe all of these things to be true based on my asking around. Is that a reasonable price?
    Also, what kind of fencing will they require once we take them off the picket line that we intend to use first - we have some areas that we are hoping to clear up a bit and would like the ladies to forage there. Finally, what do you goat owners do if you want to go away for the w/e? Or don't you?!??! All of our family lives away and, while we can still afford the gas, we like to go visiting on summer w/e. Not EVERY w/e and not even that much but it is still part of our lives that I need to consider before bringing home any new members of the family. Obviously, when the does need to be milked, going away is not an option...and I am aware of that.
    Thanks for your help everyone!
    Heidi in NY
     
  2. TimandPatti

    TimandPatti Texas

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    Location:
    Texas
    Sounds like a deal to me.
    Are they CAE free"?
    We use cattle panels for fencing. As far as going on vacation or leaving for the weekend. I went away one time in 3 years for a day and a half. I paid a neighbor to feed and water all my critters and do the milking.

    I adore Nubian's, they are SO sweet!
     

  3. BubbleTea

    BubbleTea Active Member

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    Location:
    Maryland
    In my area in Maryland you can't get a goat with papers for that price.....it would be more like $300 each...
     
  4. TimandPatti

    TimandPatti Texas

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    Location:
    Texas
    When we lived in the Nebraska Panhandle, you could get goats pretty cheap. The most I paid was 150.00, I bought 5 for 50.00 each. Here in Texas they go for 200.00 on up.
     
  5. mary,tx

    mary,tx Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I don't know what " on the picket line" means, but I would suggest you not bring home goats before you have fencing and shelter ready for them.
    We use field fencing. We don't go away.
    mary
     
  6. heidith

    heidith Well-Known Member

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    Hi all,
    Thanks for your help...the picket line is what my goatie-friend said we can do in an area that we want goats to help us clear but cannot fence in. I'm not crazy about the idea, frankly, as it means a halter and chain and makes me feel oogy to think about two sweet goats on leashes. But, it WOULD be temporary and they would be in a large fenced area in the spring. We have very good housing for them and DH and I were talking yesterday about creating the sleeping pallets for them and where we could put the feed manger and so on. I'm not overrun with predators although I do have foxes and the occasional coyote. Will a fox bother a goat?!?! I know a coyote will...
    Finally, I'm wondering what plants a goat cannot eat when foraging. Are there any? And if they spend their day eating brush, weeds and plants and things what should I supplement with?
    Okay, I guess I really need some reading material suggestions. I'm currently just looking through the Emery book on Country Living and it has some good information but not enough maybe.
    Thanks again. I'm going to go see them this afternoon!
    Heidi in NY
     
  7. TimandPatti

    TimandPatti Texas

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    May 28, 2003
    Location:
    Texas
    Goats are browsers, mine didn't care for weeds. LOL They sure do like trees though.

    I never had a fox bother my goats, my donkeys kept the coyotes away.

    Assume that all garden shrubs are a potential danger to goats.
    Some plants cause delayed poisoning as well as immediate poisoning ragwort and St John’s wort.
    Some plants are equally toxic when fresh or when dried in hay eg ragwort.
    Plants that cause diarrhoea:
    Hemlock
    Oak (young leaves)
    Wild arum
    Castor seed (in foodstuffs)
    Foxglove
    Water dropwort
    Box
    Potato (green)
    Rhododendron
    Linseed
    Plants that cause haemorrhage
    Bracken fern
    Plants that cause nervous signs:
    Ragwort
    Hemlock
    Water dropwort
    Potato
    Black nightshade
    Male fern
    Rhododendron
    Laburnum
    Rape
    Rhubarb
    Common sorrel
    Prunus family
    Plants that cause photosensitisation:
    Ragwort
    St John’s wort
    Buckwheat
    Plants that cause sudden death:
    Yew
    Rhododendron
    Laurel
    Linseed
    Foxglove
    Water dropwort
    Plants that cause frothy bloat:
    Legumes -clover, lucerne
    Plants that case anaemia
    Rape
    Kale
    Plants that cause constipation
    Oak (acorns and old leaves)
    Linseed
    Plants that cause vomiting:
    Rhododendron
    Azalea
    Pieris
    Black nightshade
    Gladiolus corms
    Daffodil bulbs
    Plants that cause goitre and stillbirth:
    Brassica spp
    Linseed
    Some clovers
    Plants that case oestrus
    Some clovers
    Plants that discolour urine
    Bracken
    Oak
    Rape
    Kale
    Cabbage
    Brussel sprouts
    British Goat Society list the following plants to be a danger to goats under certain circumstances:

    Mayweed, Old man’s beard, Charlock, Bryony, Woody nightshade, Deadly nightshade, Honeysuckle, Fool’s parsley, Buttercup, Anemone, Less celandine, Bulbs and their leaves eg daffodil, tulip, aconite, etc, Walnut and Oak.
    Treatment of plant poisoning in goats
    Remove the plant from the goat - empty its mouth if possible.
    Keep the goat walking slowly so that it doesn’t settle and start cudding.
    Give large quantities of strong cold tea. The tannic acids will precipitate many of the alkaloids and salts of heavy metals. Strong coffee will have similar effects.
    Don’t dose a vomiting goat.
    Don’t give tea to a goat that has been poisoned with acorns that are full of tannic acid already.
    Give large doses of liquid paraffin (500ml) as a first aid remedy.
    Treat for shock - keep quiet and warm.
    Try to identify the source of poison to tell the vet.
    Give a mixture of eggs, sugar and milk t soothe and relieve irritation of the stomach linings.
     
  8. Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians

    Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    North of Houston TX
    Let's assume for a moment that each goat is in excellent health, giving 1 gallon of milk each day during the height of her season and has been treated very well. I believe all of these things to be true based on my asking around. Is that a reasonable price?
    ................................................

    That's a huge assumption, read the boards. Most folks do not have gallon milkers, or does who even have the potential of milking anywhere near that. Have you milked the goats yourself to make sure they are truly what they are being touted as being, I have seen milkers that could only be handled by the owner. Have you tasted the milk? Do the two get along? A 6 year old and a 2 year old unless they have lived together always, would not be friends in my herd and I would not sell them as pair, the 2 year old would never get a bite to eat or a place to lay for months until the 6 year old finally figuered out that this was her only friend and her only source of heat in the winter! A 6 year old could be a very good buy, but with ill manners and not used to being milked she could also be a nitemare. By 6 a doe is full size, usually around 200 pounds, and you being new, she will take full advantage of her size to get away with everything!

    Goats are smart and highly adaptable, they will do fine on a tether as long as you are there to watch them. A goat not used to a tether is going to get all tangled up in the rope/chain get it around trees, snagged in brush.

    You can milk anything, but living on brush a doe will not milk anywhere near her potential, certainly not a gallon. It takes alot of calories and water to make a gallon of milk, there simply isn't that kind of nutrients in browse or pastrue.

    Read the alfalfa pellet posts, read about grain and mixes that folks are using, read on new ways of feeding goats a much more natural diet to get milk and kids. A good dry grain with no mollasas, alfalfa pellets in their barn before they go out and eat in the pasture will go a long ways in keeping them out of anything poisinous, a good loose cattle mineral and plenty of clean water. Hoof trimming, worming when you get them home, a clean place to milk with a good pre cleaning and post dipping routine. Goats thrive on routine. Really good sites to visit besides this one...saanendoah.com fiascofarm.com dairygoatsplus.com caprinesupply.com jefferspet.com Caprine Supply has a wonderful book out Caprine 101 excellent packed full of information. Vicki
     
  9. heidith

    heidith Well-Known Member

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    Thanks Vicki. I will check out all of your resources and explore this very thoroughly before I purchase these two ladies. The good news is that they have lived together since the two year old was born and live at a very reputable goat's milk/cheese farm in my area. The owner indicated that the does were giving that much milk at the HEIGHT of their milking season and I'm planning on getting them after they've been dried off so I am not taking on more than I can manage right away. IF I feel confident with them by next year I may breed them again and try milking and having kids here at our house. The family who is selling them has won numerous awards in Goat Championship stuff (I know little to nothing about the showing aspect of animal raising) and, as I said, has a very strong reputation in our area as a top of the line goat farm. So, I feel rather comfortable with them but just not comfortable with mySELF!! I'm working on that...
    Thanks again.
    Heidi in NY
     
  10. Hank - Narita

    Hank - Narita Well-Known Member

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    Aug 12, 2002
    Vicki is right about getting a gallon a day. Our Alpines are almost at that but are from old milking lines and they are slowing down a bit after only 5 months fresh. Vicki, have you heard from Bernice? Sure do miss her Alpine talk.
     
  11. Eveningstar

    Eveningstar Active Member

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    Aug 11, 2005
    Location:
    N MI
    I fully agree with Mary tx on the tethering. Don't bring your goats home before you have adequate fencing for them. Chains or ropes wrapped aroung the legs can cause awful lacerations and a possiblility of a goat losing a leg. They can be fine one minute and strangling the next.

    Have you tasted the milk from the goats you are buying?
     
  12. heidith

    heidith Well-Known Member

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    Okay, thanks for the tethering information. So I guess I shouldn't plan to let them browse through this area that we're not planning to fence in? I was going to have them do that and THEN move them into their fenced area...not an option, you think? I would be around at all times when they were tethered or else they wouldn't be on the lines. The idea was for them to eat a pathway to our pond for us! It's brush and local plants, most of which I can identify. After they had eaten the pathway to the pond we were going to put them in their fenced in area.
    I have not yet tasted their milk but have eaten the cheese that comes from their milk and it's awesome. The farm sells their cheeses and milk locally. Now, of course, I'm having a difficult time scheduling a meeting between the does and I. Hoping it will happen this week.
    Heidi in NY
     
  13. susanne

    susanne Nubian dairy goat breeder

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    michigan
    hi heidi,
    why don't you keep at least on of them in milk until breed again?
    this way you can get a routine and learn more about your goats. is it possible to have them breed at the farm were they are now?
    susanne
     
  14. Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians

    Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians Well-Known Member

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    North of Houston TX
    Hi, Bernice posts over at dairygoatsplus.com I just skim over Alpine Talk, only posting when I want to irritate someone :) Vicki
     
  15. Laura Workman

    Laura Workman (formerly Laura Jensen) Supporter

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    Lynnwood, Washington
    Since you have a well-fenced in area, it sounds like you're just wanting them to eat brush a bit while you're with them, and the rest of the time, they'll be within the well-fenced area, right?

    If you're planning to be there ALL the time while they're tethered, which is the only safe way to tether anyway, why not simply take a few days and train them to come when called, with their favorite grain treat as a reward. That way, you can leave them untethered to eat the brush in the area and still get them back when you want to go do something else?