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The subject of deworming seems like a hot topic. So my next question is which dewormer do y'all use?

Thank you for the correction...I usually can spot a misspelled word a mile away but lost my way on this one! 馃榿
Whenever I get him I will go take a photo of my dewormer I also have a sheep and goat drench which is the pretty much same thing as wormer I use it on the sheep
 

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Yes...... and withers are subject to getting their plumbing clogged up if fed to much feed.... I keep mine fed 鈥渇eed鈥 as little as possible..... just enough to keep their attention when the feed bucket is rattled.... when you can shake the bucket and they jump up and stand on your head looking down then you won鈥檛 be spending hours chasing them out of the neighbors flower bed...... just shake the bucket and get outa the way...
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I do plan on giving them some feed, as I understand the wethers can be prone to urinary calculi and the feed I bought them has ammonium chloride. They will have access to forage in their goat pen while I am at work, mostly just grass, some clover, along with some hay.
Your wormer will/should depend on what worms you are fighting. Unless its a tapeworm, you'll need a microscope to see the little beast. The FAMACHA method is fairly easy. What also worked for me was the "last 2 to dinner" method. I raised dairy goats (after I figured out that boer goats were "meat" animals and people wanted to buy them for BBQ....How could they eat my babies? Hubby said I sucked at being a farmer. ;)) At one time I had 25 Nubian milkers. I fed a handful of grain to the girls because there were either in milk, bred, or getting ready to be bred. The last 2-3 that came running for dinner, were the ones I looked at. Made it simply. Sick or heavily wormed goats don't come running usually. In my experience, most wormers that were designed for goats were totally ineffective. My go to was Ivermectin. I rarely had to treat worms. I always treated a few days after they delivered their kids. Other than that, I didn't have a worm problem.
Thank you for the advice, hiddensprings, its very informative. I've heard mixed reviews about the pelleted dewormer so I don't want to mess around with anything that isn't going to work the first time around. I haven't even reached the stage yet where I could part with any baby chicks, let alone baby goats. I still don't have a rooster for that very reason, lol!
 

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Discussion Starter #24
Yes...... and withers are subject to getting their plumbing clogged up if fed to much feed.... I keep mine fed 鈥渇eed鈥 as little as possible..... just enough to keep their attention when the feed bucket is rattled.... when you can shake the bucket and they jump up and stand on your head looking down then you won鈥檛 be spending hours chasing them out of the neighbors flower bed...... just shake the bucket and get outa the way...
[/QUOTE
I do plan on giving them some feed, as I understand the wethers can be prone to urinary calculi and the feed I bought them has ammonium chloride. They will have access to forage in their goat pen while I am at work, mostly just grass, some clover, along with some hay. So when you give them feed, is it just a handful, like a treat? I do plan on trying to train them with some sweet feed too, for things like hoof trimming. I am trying to be conscientious of what I am feeding the goaties...my first year with chickens I'm pretty sure two of them died from liver failure from me over-feeding them treats.

I know I'm probably waaaaayyyy overthinking on how to feed goats...I guess I just need them to finally get here, then I'll be too busy to obsess over how to feed my goats!
 

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You're wasting wormer doing it like that AND you're goats will build a resistance to the wormers. Overtime the meds you are using will be less and less effective. No need to worm unless you have a worm problem.
My vet recommends worming every 3-4 weeks. I don't do it, though. I'm kind of haphazard with it, but I usually only worm when one of them is showing signs of worm overload (soft stool) and/or before they kid. I've seen several people say not to give them worm meds when they're pregnant, but I've found that it doesn't hurt the mothers or the kids. And right after the mother kids seems to be the most vulnerable time for them or when they are most susceptible to worm overload. So, I've found that nipping it in the bud works better for me.
 

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Pelleted dewormers have been overused and the worms are immune.

Safeguard doesn鈥檛 work on anything but tapeworms.

Soft poop is more likely coccidia than worm overload.

Any veterinarian who advocates deworming every three or four weeks knows NOTHING about goats, ruminants, or parasites.
 

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After several years of reading about, saving, and preparing for goats, I finally have two Pygmy withers and a doe coming to live with us on April 16th! They will be 8-weeks old by then. I鈥檓 so excited, yet anxious...I know how to raise and care for dogs, cats, and chickens extremely well, but goats are on a different level, to me. I鈥榙 like to think I鈥檓 prepared, especially with fencing, but I鈥檓 sure I鈥檓 missing something(s)... I have all the necessary supplies: feed, hay, minerals, hoof trimmer, milk stanchion, FAMACHA chart, etc., but what I don鈥檛 have is the hands-on knowledge like I do with puppies, kittens and chicks. I鈥榤 hoping my experience with raising the aforementioned will provide me with some insight/intuition on how to care for the kids.

Someday I plan on having milk goats, but for now I just want to focus on raising/training these three while learning proper care for ruminants, in addition to starting a small flock of sheep in the near future.

I鈥檇 love to hear from y鈥檃ll who are well-seasoned in raising/keeping goats and have any advice for a fledgling goat keeper! 馃榿 馃悙

If you don't have them yet, my advise would be to change your mind now. Run away from the idea, and never look back. Or spend the rest of your life fixing fence, delivering babies, and always carrying cookies around in your pockets. Goats are like a drug, once you have them you are hooked. I have been trying to get out of the goat business for forty years. Run now while you can. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #30
If you don't have them yet, my advise would be to change your mind now. Run away from the idea, and never look back. Or spend the rest of your life fixing fence, delivering babies, and always carrying cookies around in your pockets. Goats are like a drug, once you have them you are hooked. I have been trying to get out of the goat business for forty years. Run now while you can. ;)
Lolololol, I appreciate your honest reply! I can honestly say that I have been thinking about this for at least 7 years, while we were still living in the city, so this is no whim. While I love my dogs, cats, and chickens, I want the challenge of literally a different species of animal to raise. Let鈥檚 just hope I didn鈥榯 bite off more than I can chew. 馃構
 

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Lolololol, I appreciate your honest reply! I can honestly say that I have been thinking about this for at least 7 years, while we were still living in the city, so this is no whim. While I love my dogs, cats, and chickens, I want the challenge of literally a different species of animal to raise. Let鈥檚 just hope I didn鈥榯 bite off more than I can chew. 馃構
Well if I can't talk you out of it, here is the most important thing for you to know. Build good fences, ahead of time. They are cute and cuddly for about six weeks, then they turn in demon children escape artists.
 
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