New to cows/raising beef calves

Discussion in 'Cattle' started by Unregistered-1427815803, Dec 16, 2003.

  1. We live on 10 acres and have just bought 2 jerseys with calves , which we're going to sell the calves and use cows to rear some beef calves, and eventually sell the beef calves. What would the best type of beef calves be to buy, also is it better to buy little bull calves than heifers.
    With Bull calves to raise for beef is it best to steer them and if using the band thing to steer is it ok for anyone to do or is a vet needed.
    Thank-you
     
  2. arnoldw

    arnoldw Well-Known Member

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    May 22, 2003

    Congradulationd on your Jersey's.
    Im guessing booth of your calves you have know are little bulls. If so you do want to band them. If not maybe you should consider keeping them and breed them later. As far as breeding the Jersey any of the good beef breeds would work. I perfer Black Angus since they bring more at auction time, If you are going to buy calves to bottrle feed, Then I recommened you find a dairy with Holestine or Ayrshire and buy week old bulls. They should run around $50 a peice according to where your at in the country. If possible buy directly from the dairyman and make sure they are at least a week old and had a chance to drink from Moma (Colosturam from the cow) . Hope this helps Arnold
     

  3. Mountain Mom

    Mountain Mom Active Member

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    Feb 25, 2003
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    Northern VT
    I'm not all that experienced, but we are raising our first calf ourselves. This is my 2 cents: Band them early - the earlier the better as far as handling them. We waited until he was 3 months, would have been better to do when he was 3 days! Yes, you can do it yourself, but finding "both" obstacles was a challenge for us. We thought we had it under control, but after 3-4 weeks nothing was 'falling off', so we ended up having the vet make a house call. And to our surprise we had 'missed one' :rolleyes:

    Consider dehorning - we did it because my young children are around him all the time and he loves to head-butt you with affection (even at 300+ lbs!) If you choose to dehorn (we had the vet make another house call), do it early. Again handling was the issue. I understand this can be done yourself too, but we didn't have the materials (I didn't want to use the paste), or know-how and our vet in extremely accomodating and affordable. Maybe next time.

    Our "Norman" was a gift, so he is not the best choice for beef - he's a Holstein - but the learning experience has been great fun. Eventhough he is freezer bound, he is pampered much like a pet. Next spring we hope to get another calf, probably a breed more 'beefy'.

    Good Luck!
     
  4. Jena

    Jena Well-Known Member

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    You probably want to put a stop to that head-butting now. When he weighs 1000 pounds and sends you flying about 20 feet, it isn't cute anymore.

    When he butts, smack him one on the shoulder and yell at him. If that doesn't work, give him a boot in the nose. Avoid petting his head, pet his shoulders instead.

    Just my thoughts

    Jena---who has been sent flying by a 1000 pound steer and it wasn't fun.
     
  5. Mountain Mom

    Mountain Mom Active Member

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    Location:
    Northern VT
    Thanks Jena, I have been trying to discourage him, he thinks he's a puppy and it's just not "safe" any more :) It was cute when he was little, he doesn't realize that he's a bovine, he's never been with his own kind. But, your right, it's a dangerous behavior now. Thanks for the reminder.
     
  6. Tracy in Idaho

    Tracy in Idaho Well-Known Member Supporter

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    In my area, it is VERY VERY rare to find a bottle beef calf for sale. Near impossible. Some of the dairies do use Angus bulls on their Jersey heifers, and that has been about as close as we can get.

    We've done pretty well raising holstein bottle babies (steers) and selling them at about 350 lbs.

    Tracy
     
  7. I was woundering if you would have any jerseys for sale?I was looking to get one. Would it make a good pet? If not do you know anyone in oregon?
    please reply!
     
  8. tinknal

    tinknal Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Minnesota
    I wouldn't get rid of the jersey calves, a jersey can easily raise 2 calves, and jerseys raised on the cow do fairly well, at least for your own consumption (jerseys yellow fat tends to turn some people off). Beef calves are hard to find, so take what you can get, or get holstiens, they make good beef too.
     
  9. I know someone with jersey calfs for sale in oregon, just picked up 7 calfs at auction. 4 jerseys, 1 jersey x, 1 holstien, and 1 angus x. All being bottle fed right now.