New things dieing this year

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by sullen, Oct 27, 2006.

  1. sullen

    sullen Question Answerer

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    I have been planting a few things this year, and some last fall. Well they are all dieing. Not the old stuff it's right next to, but he new stuff. All over the big yard. The 2 Butterfly bushes I planted, one next to the house, one in the front yard, (150 feet away) died. Didn't think much of it but then the nice white stemmy thing I got this spring died as soon as I planted it. I had it for a month before I planted it, it was fine. As soon as I put it in the good rich herb garden, poof, dead. I also planted the Red twigged Dogwood I go at a sale in the back but the leach field, and it has died. Taken longer but all the leaves are gone and the grass is still green.
    So now I have 3 new Red Twigged dogwood I am afraid to plant because I don't want them to die. How can things die that are planted all over the yard? And yes I have been watering them.....
    Oh I forgot the daylillies I snagged off freecycle are fine. I planted them next to where the Butterfly bush died. Go figure....
     
  2. swamp man

    swamp man Well-Known Member

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    Not sure about the butterfly bush.Those things are usually pretty tough.Dogwoods,however,as trees go, have a fairly low survivability rate for planting from a pot,and even lower in transplanting.A liquid root stimulator can help tip the scales in your favor.Good luck.
     

  3. dlangland

    dlangland dlangland

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    All my years, I have never had a problem with a red-twigged dogwood, neither have I ever given them special care or treatment. I bought one bareroot parent plant years ago, watered it when I planted it. It took off and I have produced many other bushes over the yrs. in 2 dif states not just for myself, but for most everyone I know. Last yr., in fact, since I wasn't going to be seeing some friends out of state for too long to keep what I dug up as bareroot plants, I potted up 5 or 6 for their tree strip on their farm. Thru them in the ground and all are still doing well.

    Sullen, I believe too often the cause of failure for any plant is over-watering. I only water new trees when I first plant them, then after that only if in a drought, like 6 wks. of absolutely no rain. I am sure you have heard this, but when you do water, it's important to water deeply to encourage the bush/tree, whatever plant, to grow deep roots in search of water. If you water too often, they just develop a shallow root system and never toughen up. Up here in the midwest we have such winds. They just have to toughen up, so it's like you almost have to be mean to them.

    My yrs. as a professional gardener for very wealthy people who insisted on running their fancy sprinkler systems most every day...Wow, terrible problems with things like fungus, root rot, and if something had to be dug up to be replaced, there would be virtually no root system. They just have to keep that grass green, though. Another thing is to be very careful with when planting trees or shrubs is to be careful to get the main taproot deep enough. I cheat a lot on the proportions of the holes I dig in the ground, but the depth of the center of the hole where that main taproot is going is very important. I usually throw in a few handfuls of leaves or even little twigs to keep the soil from packing so hard. Just something to think about.
    Deb
     
  4. swamp man

    swamp man Well-Known Member

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    I'm not familiar with the red-twigged dogwood.Most of what we have are just regular whites,but I see pinks here once in a great while.If the red-twiggeg variety is a cultivar with higher success rate,please hip me to it! :)
    Unless one of my landscapin' customers is really insistant on my incorporating new dogwoods in the landscape,I generally discourage it.Aside from the transplant difficultiues,the last several yers,we have had some serious fungus and disease problems with dogwoods,and even most of the old natives are either dead or dying.Apparenty,most of these problems are soil-borne,and very difficuult to solve.
    I couldn't agree more with your watering policy on new plants.For sure,if a plant don't need to send deep roots,it wont,and will remain a lazy,weak little spoiled thing.They're kinda' like people,aint they?
    I make my living installing lanscapes,irrigation systems,and maintaining both for mostly very wealthy folks,and These folks just wont be told.They drown everything in sight,the plants dont root well,and the fungus is out of control.We have a real long fall/early winter,the weather is just right for fungus,and the first thing they do when fungus starts killing the lawn is....start watering more.I re-program the control clocks,and they just change 'em back. :shrug:
    The healthiest lawns I have are old St. Augustine,and they dont have irrigation ststems.
     
  5. dlangland

    dlangland dlangland

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    http://greenwoodnursery.com/page.cfm/260
    Swampman, Hip me to it...Wow. I lead a sheltered midwest lifestyle. Funny.
    This site is not where I bought mine before I started raising my own so please don't think I am recommending or advertising for this company. I just liked this picture showing a series of the red-twigged dogwood used as a hedge, or like I mentioned, a windbreak, and there is also a bit of care information below. They are beautiful planted individually, though, but I am not patient enough right now to look for a picture of a single specimum. I sometime plant one within or on the edge of a perennial or herb bed just so there is something to look at during the boring winter. White flowers in spring and little berries that attract bird during the summer. Really pretty foliage in the fall. Can either prune, cut way back if necessary, or leave in a natural state. The red branches are beautiful in the winter against the snow, plus what is neat is the pruned branches can be used in dif craft projects, or even wreath making. Actually, I think I got Sullen all confused by now. There are dogwood trees and dogwood bushes. I think you were talking about bushes, but I think Swampman was talking about trees, and that is entirely dif story, except those theories on watering we both spoke about apply to any plant, even houseplants. More houseplants die of overwatering then any other ailment. Very interesting. Maybe if I sleep my brain will be more clear tomorrow.
    Deb
     
  6. swamp man

    swamp man Well-Known Member

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    Thanks,Dlangland. Never heard of a dogwood bush before.I've gotta' go pick up a trailer load of pansies at the nursery in a bit,and I'll ask 'em about it.
     
  7. Danaus29

    Danaus29 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Dead or dormant??? Recently transplanted stuff goes into dormancy earlier than older plants because of the stress. I don't water new plantings after the first settling in either, unless it gets overly dry. I mulch well after the first watering and usually forget about them.
     
  8. sullen

    sullen Question Answerer

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    http://www.youcanlearnseries.com/Landscape/Plants/RedTwigDogwood.aspx
    Red twigged Dogwood bush. I have one nonvariegated and just got 2 variegated. (The first one was supposed to be variegated, but wasn't) They are really pretty here, where winter is over half the year. In fact the one planted is already bare. AND it is DOING FINE.
    OK guys, sorry it took me so long to get back to you, but my Internet was down all weekend.

    The point was missed....the dogwood I planted a few years ago is fine...really huge, in fact. it's the few things I planted this year that died. And the 2 buddelias I planted last year.
    I am afraid to plant the 2 dogwoods I just got, they might die. Since it's not the watering, I water just fine. And everything else is fine. In fact there is a Coral Bells right next to the white thing I planted and the Coral Bells is fine....so was the bush, before i planted it. And my Holly lost all it's leaves. The one in the back yard. There is no good explanation for it.
    The hops I planted is fine, the other vine I transplanted is fine. :help:
     
  9. dlangland

    dlangland dlangland

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    Yes, that's the same bush I was talking about, Sullen, just a dif picture. Easy care, and very pretty. Maybe I missed it, but I don't believe you mentioned where you bought these other then you said you bought them at a sale. Was that at a store, or from an individual who propagates plants? You said the daylilies came from Freecycle. If any of these plants came with a guarantee, I wouldn't feel bad about cashing in on those and not use that same company in the future. Is there something going on in your area in regard to chemical usage or sprays you may or may not be aware of? If I think hard enough I can usually blame most everyone's gardening problems on chemicals since I don't believe in them. Same as I probably the only one that believes a person can over-fertilize.

    It's just my thought but often potted plants, trees or shrubs look nice in their pots at the store, but are actually already struggling for their lives once they work up such a huge root ball. There should be a law against that. I am sure you are loosening the rootball up before you plant. I try to stick with bareroot plants when available. Always have better luck with them on the long haul. Wish I knew what to tell you.

    Deb
     
  10. Pony

    Pony STILL not Alice Supporter

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    Could there be something on/near your planting tools that may be carrying some sort of something-or-other that's causing the die-off?

    And I hate to ask it, but is someone ticked off at you? It just seems, I dunno, odd, I guess...

    Paranoid mood, I suppose. Must be the holiday. Or too many Tootsie Rolls...

    Pony!
     
  11. sullen

    sullen Question Answerer

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    I never thought of that, Pony. But I did move my Clematis with those tools and it's recovered just fine. The tools are outside, getting rained on, under the deck. And I use them to move mulch, hay, clean hen houses, etc.
    I got the name of the white thing.....Ligularia. It was great, in the pot, here for about a month, then I planted it. It died so fast you could watch it die. I was storing it above the hole, so it wasn't the light change....Who knows. It may come back next spring.
    It can't be a chemical, the plants around them are fine. The grass under the holly is great, still green.
    D, my problem is it is a few plants, everything else is fine. See above, grass under bush is green. Mind boggling.
    But then again I am the person who had yellow cukes this year............
     
  12. sullen

    sullen Question Answerer

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    Editing.....the Ligularia is another plant, which is doing fine. Srry. Now I don't know what the white thing is.
     
  13. dlangland

    dlangland dlangland

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    I am fairly sure I am the one that is boggling your mind right now, Sullen. Sorry about that. Yellow cukes...The only time I have that problem is when I accidentally don't get some of mine picked at the right stage. Once they are over-mature, they turn yellow. Just pick them anyway, and compost them so the vines keep producing. I often plant one earlier row, and another later row, then just pull up the early row. That way a person always has a fresh crop coming in.
    Deb
     
  14. Pat

    Pat Well-Known Member

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    I know this is probably a very stupid question, but...

    Where did you buy the things that are dieing?
    Did you do the SEED Catalog WATCHDOG (www.gardenwatchdog.com)?

    If you bought them locally, did you bust the root ball (seems like most things I can buy locally are so root bound that I need a big knife to bust them apart).

    Did you make a 10 times better hole than the plant cost for it? (old saying was make a $10 hole for a $1 plant)?

    Did you make a rectangular hole for them, or a round one? (plants will run into the rectangular sides and turn back inward... they will bore through a round side)

    Did you make some holes in the sides / bottom of the hole (and point the roots toward them)?

    Did you get all the air pockets out when you back filled? (I typically back fill half full, then give half of the water I'm going to give, then finish back filling and give the rest of the water).

    Pat