New Selenium Map by Counties also

Discussion in 'Goats' started by Sondra Peterson, Jan 12, 2005.

  1. Ark

    Ark Well-Known Member

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    Wow, that is great!

    Now, how do you know what is the optimum level?? :eek:

    Thanks for posting this info.
     

  2. Tango

    Tango Well-Known Member

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  3. susanne

    susanne Nubian dairy goat breeder

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  4. tnd5

    tnd5 Well-Known Member

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    WOW! that is great! Now, how do I find out how much of the different mineral levels are needed by my babies?

    Thanks,
    tnd
     
  5. Stacy Adams

    Stacy Adams Well-Known Member

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  6. susanne

    susanne Nubian dairy goat breeder

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    so, that means too much selenium is much woers than not enough. and there is no cure for toxic levels. wonder how many goats died of selenium poisening? :rolleyes:
    susanne
     
  7. Sondra Peterson

    Sondra Peterson Well-Known Member

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    not very many Susanne. There is only one area in the US that is high in selenium part of Idaho I think. If you are in marginal or defiencent then you need to supplement. Many many more goats are lacking than will ever die of too much. Now sheep are a different story.
     
  8. M&G-Nubians

    M&G-Nubians Member

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    I would also keep in consideration where your feed products come from. I live in a county that of course has no data. But, I know that my hay broker gets his bales from a totally different area that just so happens to have data. My no data area with his data available area still keeps me in a guessing state. Without lab testing the products I feed. I have no accurate way to know for sure. So, I choose to supplement and be happy. :) I suppose I could contact my county extension office or the state university in the area and make a better best guess evaluation. DUH! Why didn't I think of that?
     
  9. Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians

    Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians Well-Known Member

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    Don't forget to take into consideration that if any other vitamins or minerals are ascew in your goats diet that the absorption of other vitamins and minerals will be off also. Our copper is more off than the person in the next county because of the ironore in our water and grass that the gots eat. Your best bet is to use blood samples of selenium levels in your herd, taken several times of the year before you change anything. The only normal selenium level we have ever gotten was about 30 days after bolstering, so we know that Bo-se given at 1cc per 40 pounds only gives us normal blood levels for about 30 days, but we do not then go low enough to justify giving the girls injections every 30 days. Even with our selenium levels higher in our minerals and grain because we go off label with these, they still don't absorb it correctly, likely to do with the iron.

    Copper biopsy on a liver slice of a dead older doe in your herd is the best way to tell with this. Just stick the slice into a ziplock and freeze it until you can send it in.

    Never let and older doe just go into the ground without using her to help with your herd managment, remember we will never see adult larve accept in the intestine of a dead animal. Even slicing open dead kids (especially 3 month olds) helps you diagnose if you have cocci, their intestines will be riddled with white bumps they look like large white heads. Vicki