New roof for old barn

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Unregistered-1427815803, Jun 20, 2004.

  1. I would like to put a new corregated metal roof on an old barn. Well actually, I want to strip it down to the posts. The posts are good heavy cedar posts and are solid. I am thinking using metal purlin and Z for using screws, but you are welcome to talk me out of that in favor of wood if you think it would be better. I plan on drilling through metal and bolting it to the posts.

    My basic question is how far can corregated span? Would 3-1/2 feet work? I will have some translucent panels since there is no electricity there. Currently the roof is supported on rotting 2x4s on 2 foot centers. Posts are anywhere from 8 feet to 12 feet apart, but there are a couple of mid-point posts missing on one side (missing midway between outer walls and posts holding up the ridge--there are 3 out of 5 there--front, back and middle). Overall size is about 40 wide x 25 deep. Dirt floor.

    This does not need to be fancy, only functional. It will not be a shop other than working on farm projects. The barn will be used for hay(on pallets), field/garden tools, pipe and steel, riding mower, future tractor, etc.

    All suggestions (that are not too expensive) are welcome.
    Dale in Tx
     
  2. agmantoo

    agmantoo agmantoo Supporter

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    What you are considering doing using the metal works fine. The screws will give a superior strength into the metal and insect damage is eliminated. The span varies depending on the area load factors and the metal thickness of the corrugated. With a minimal snow load and with the 29 gauge metal about 39 inches is the maximum span. If your building has an A roof I suggest that you run the fiberglass panels lengthways as a ridge cap. Less chance of leaking and the corrugation pattern does not have to match. This modified ridge cap will let lots of light in but will permit you to change it out when the fiberglass fails in the future. If your building is a shed roof then run the fiberglass as short panels on the side walls at the top of the wall and under the eve of the roof.
     

  3. No snow here (but there is big hail LOL)--could I span 42 inches without snow and save me a few some Zs? (Purlin that is--I'm not talking about sleep.) The sides are too low for translucent panels--about 5 feet tall on sides and I don't want cattle coming in through the sides, about 10 feet high in the center. I would like more light than just the ridge. I'm thinking of the the entire row where the translucent panels of being on top to be able to replace an entire 'line' if a panel breaks.Thickness of the panels will be whatever is sold at the Lowes or maybe McCoys.
    Thanks,
    Dale in Tx

     
  4. agmantoo

    agmantoo agmantoo Supporter

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    Move up to 26 gauge and go for 5 ft spacing if you want. The ridge cap will let more light in than you realize, just leave the ridge open about 16 to 18 inches total. Those fiberglass panels are not desireable as part of the roof in my opinion.
     
  5. charles

    charles Well-Known Member

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    Agree with Agmantoo, fiberglass panels get brittle and rot long before the metal gets old. I'd put them in a place where the could most easily be replaced. Ridge seems good.
     
  6. Ozarks_1

    Ozarks_1 Well-Known Member

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    We've been using fiberglass panels as skylights in our shop building for a little more than ten years. Haven't encountered any problems with them.
     
  7. Dad built a tin shed (40x60) in '64, still going strong. It has one fiberglass pannel along the 40' side about 4' high. It has lasted fine there. I am _very_ glad it is not on the roof, it would not have lasted here in MN with snow, hail, & sun. Lighting is good through 1/2 of the building, the other side is shadowy without any fiberglass on that side....

    I personally would do endwalls or a side with the fiberglass, anything to avoid making a weak roof.

    You can span whatever you want, but going more than 2.5' makes things real weak, esp if you are starting with the weak box-store tin. If you want it to last another 40 years, I'd vote for an extra couple of metal holders.

    --->Paul