New llama

Discussion in 'Camelids' started by CrowellCreek, Jul 28, 2015.

  1. CrowellCreek

    CrowellCreek Member

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    Jul 20, 2015
    Location:
    La Center, Washington
    So we added a 7 year old female gaurd llama to our farm for the protection of our dairy goats about 2 months ago. We love what a great job she does although she isn't exactly friendly ... she did come with great references for the job. Anyways when purchasing her my husband fell in love with a little male cria and we got a 2 for 1 special.... any advice for us new Llama owners? Especially with a 5.5 month old cria coming home any day??
     

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  2. Big Dave

    Big Dave Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    West Central Arkansas
    I just lost both my females in the last couple of months. Deer have a contagious virus I can not recall the name of right now. You must inoculate them about every 45 days to keep them healthy. Also the male will need much more attention to have the fighting teeth blunted. The males spit much more than the females. Both of mine were female. The oldest never spat. Baby the youngest spit every time it was feeding time. Also I have two new never been worn llama halters. These are made for llamas for the nose breathing passages are different. The male may start to breed even when not fully mature. Today is the first time I have been on in several months. I will look and come back on to tell yall of the virus. llamas have NO immunity to it.
     

  3. CrowellCreek

    CrowellCreek Member

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    Jul 20, 2015
    Location:
    La Center, Washington
    Wow thanks for the advice Dave, I had no idea about viruses. Do you think it could be a regional thing?
     
  4. Raeven

    Raeven Reluctant Adult Supporter

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    The Wilds of Oregon
    CrowellCreek, welcome to the forum, first off. :)

    I think the virus may indeed be a regional thing, because my two gelded male llamas are in contact with deer all the time and I haven't had any problems. However, do call your vet and ask if this has been an issue where you are. I'm going to do the same. Thanks for that, Big Dave!

    The only thing I would add is, do be very careful of llamas, particularly male llamas, that haven't been raised by llamas. You should never bottle feed a llama. There is a risk of Berserk Llama Syndrome, which sounds like something I just made up but is in fact caused by overhandling by humans. Links:

    http://www.shagbarkridge.com/info/aggressv.html

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Berserk_llama_syndrome

    I keep two gelded males (not bottle raised!) with no issues of any kind, and have done for a decade. I have never been spat at by either. (I have been caught twice in crossfire between the two of them when I was feeding some treats, but that wasn't their fault. I was just in the way!) Neither have had their fighting teeth blunted and they have never fought. The most they engage in is some head elevating and teeth-flashing. It's pretty funny.

    They are easy to catch and halter.

    Make sure to trim their feet a couple times a year. That IS important!

    Have fun with your llamas!! I love mine. They are sweet, easy keepers and they definitely do deter predator attacks.
     
  5. IndyDave

    IndyDave Well-Known Member

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    Jul 16, 2017
    Location:
    Indiana
    I know, Holy Necropost!

    Seriously, since a critically important question was raised in this thread and never answered, I felt the need to supply the answer. The problem in question is meningeal worm, which is commonly hosted by deer. It is transferred to your animals by slugs picking up eggs from the deer manure and transporting them your camelids, who then pick them up as deposited within their pasture. You should vaccinate with ivermectrin once every three months in order to prevent this. In the event that one of your camelids starts doing the drunk wobble, they are already infected and will require larger daily doses of ivermectrin for several days followed by panacur for several days which will lead them to recovery if administered in time.

    This is particularly troublesome during times of wet weather, presumably because slugs don't particularly like traversing dust.