New in 2005 garden

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by HilltopDaisy, Dec 12, 2005.

  1. HilltopDaisy

    HilltopDaisy Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Is there anything you planted this past summer that was so excellent you'll definitely grow it again next year? Anything that was such a bust that you'll never plant it again?

    I grew Red Kuri squash and it was wonderful. I planted several decorative sunflowers that were a waste of space, so I won't do that again. (They were cute but did not last long once I cut them and put them in a vase). And you?
     
  2. chickenman

    chickenman Well-Known Member

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    Broccoli raab and zinnias.
    Unfortunately I didn't get to enjoy the b.r. much because we went from summer directly to winter. Enjoyed the zinnias all summer.
    Also grew sweet dumpling squash. I may or may not grow it again next season. Depends on how much space I have. There are so many varieties of winter squash.....I wish I had room to grow more.
     

  3. kathy H

    kathy H kathyh

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    I will order the tri color beans from jungs that Martain gave me a sample of, they were really tasty and so pretty.
     
  4. Paquebot

    Paquebot Well-Known Member

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    Total bust was Romanesco broccoli. Despite starting in a cold frame in March, we chopped the monster plants down in mid-October without having gotten a single head. Plants got over 4' high with stems 3" thick. Used up a lot of nutrients for nothing! Those were from SSE.

    Another flop from SSE was an oxheart carrot. All were very small. I'd blame it on weather or soil except that Lobbericher yellow carrots beside them were their usual huge size.

    Definite repeats are several un-named bush dry beans received in trade. Black and gold tepary beans will also be repeated as simple care-free borders around the community garden plot.

    Another repeat will be flathead Dutch cabbage from SSE. I'd almost forgotten just how big those things can get! Although noted for sauerkraut, we found them rather good for slaw as well.

    Martin
     
  5. adks99

    adks99 Member

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    Everyone plants tomatos right? Well this year I picked up a few Brandywine tomato plants, and they were so much better than the standard types....bigger, prettier, more luscious, simply wonderful. The best tomato I've ever had. It's the first heirloom type I've grown, and will definitely look for more this year. Makes you wonder what we've given up with all the hybrid seeds and plants that are so common nowadays.
     
  6. HilltopDaisy

    HilltopDaisy Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Almost forgot! I planted Royalty Purple Pod (bush beans) seeds were from Sand Hill Preservation Center, they were great, some really beautiful beans. Dark purple beans, blemish-free, cook up green. All my customers loved them, and I will be growing them again in 2006.
     
  7. amwitched

    amwitched Well-Known Member

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    I really liked the Maxibel green beans that I planted this year. They were so tender and stringless and produced heavily.
     
  8. Mutti

    Mutti Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Suprize cabbage...from Pinetree Gardens. Excellent taste and when I cut it off it regrew and had smaller heads late this fall. All the seeds came up and it seemed to laugh at the bugs.Made excellent saurakraut,too. Definitely plan to grow it again. Also, the RedChief strawberries I got at Jungs in their special we pick the variety deal....took off when planted this fall and already had put out runners when I covered them for the winter. DEE
     
  9. Although I've been growing these for a few years now, I'll be growing even more "Peaches and Cream" sweet corn. I shared a few of these to people who stopped by and talked me into selling them some and they have come back and asked me to grow a few extra rows for them next year.

    Also tried my luck at growing pinto beans and black eyed peas. Found out I need to plant them on a trellis of some type. They seem to taste a lot better then what you buy in the grocery store.

    This was the first time in years we had grown onions for large bulbs and we have just absolutely enjoyed cooking with them. So next year we are going to try to double or triple the amount.

    Such a bust: Last spring I was going to plant plenty of yellow sqaush and just few plants of zucchinni. Well I got the seeds mixed up and ended up planting a ton of zucchinni seeds and just a few yellow sqaush. Had more zucchinnie then I knew what to do with.
     
  10. Pony

    Pony STILL not Alice Supporter

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    Something that was WAY too prolific was the Garden Peach tomato. I wasn't going to even save any seed from it, but DH loves it so that I agreed.

    How can I say "no" to the wonderful man who builds my bed, turns my compost, happily gleans greens and browns from the curb, and doesn't mind stepping in manure?

    I think I may plant the Garden Peach in pots next year, though. ;)

    Oh, something I really will NOT plant for sure is the Armenian Yard Long. Too touchy when it comes to drought; lots of vine, very little fruit.

    Pony!
     
  11. ChickenHound

    ChickenHound Well-Known Member

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    Those Garden Peach tomatoes nearly took over my entire tomato patch! Each plant had hundreds on it! I didn't find them very suitable for canning or salsa, so the chickens ended up with most of them. They do taste good, but I won't be planting them again.
     
  12. Pony

    Pony STILL not Alice Supporter

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    The only thing worse than the Garden Peach was the Yellow Pear Tomato. Those things vined all over the place, and dropped those mini-tomatoes all over the place. I know I will have to weed out volunteers from that for the next million or two years! I can't believe Boo-Boo actually wanted some, but... I warned him!

    DH and the neighbor kids helped to keep the Garden Peaches in check, for the most part. I would give a bag or two a week to the neighbor, and her sons just inhaled them. So that made me feel good. And like I said, DH loves them.

    But you're right. They're not great for canning. They did dehydrate well, though, not for cooking but for "tomato chip" snacks.

    Pony!
     
  13. cpeyus

    cpeyus Well-Known Member

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    I'm glad I read this thread - I love those yellow pear tomatoes! I'll be careful how many & where I plant them! I would have tried canning, too ;) The dehydrated tomato chip snacks sound like a good plan, too!
     
  14. mommagoose_99

    mommagoose_99 Well-Known Member

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    THere are several items I have planted for sometime that really do well in difficult weather conditions. Johhny's selected seeds has a cherry tomato called Matt's Wild cherry. It has great flavor and doesn't crack after sudden heavy rain. The plant is huge and has tons of little shiney red tomatoes. I whole sale pickling cukes. Our favorites are Regal and Royal from Harris seeds. These two are really early and grow in cool soil. They take multiple hand pickings well. We also grow Eureka which is a few days later and has huge vines and a lot of foliage. You need to handle Eureka carefully when hand picking and do not step on the long vines or they will die back. I sell cantalopes too . My favorites are Fast Break-only 75 days, Chairenta (sp) about 82 days and Early Queen about 80 days. We plant them in thermally Opaic green plastic to get the heat needed to grow melons in NY. I am looking forward to getting some new varieties this year.
     
  15. willow_girl

    willow_girl Very Dairy

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    Hey! I love those yellow pear tomatoes ... I snack on them while picking the big 'uns! They also look pretty in salsa. :D

    I have been very pleased with Celebrity tomatoes. Second year I've grown them ... will have more next year.
     
  16. suelandress

    suelandress Windy Island Acres Supporter

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    I loved the black futsu squash. It was sold as having a hazelnutty flavor, which I couldn't detect, but it says it sweetens in storage....so maybe the next one. But they were very flavorful and prolific, and are not overly "dry"