new electric fense update

Discussion in 'Pigs' started by kountrycritters, Nov 18, 2005.

  1. kountrycritters

    kountrycritters Active Member

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    pike county, ms
    hello all,
    day 4 and all is well with pigs & electric fence. even feed time is nice they all line up along the fence line to be fed.
    should have done this along time ago cost was $126 includes charger 1/4 mile of wire and clips still have wire and clips left over.
    best thing we ever did

    donna
     
  2. Oxankle

    Oxankle Well-Known Member

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    Donna;

    What kind of fence? How many strands of charged wire? How big an enclosure? A quarter mile is not going to cover a very big pen if you make three strand fences, so I was wondering. Most chargers will handle several miles of fence so I wondered if you already had some ground fenced.

    I once met an old black man who raised pigs that way; he only used electric fences and said that once they were bitten they never again tested the fence. He had several acres so fenced, and this allowed his hogs to graze like cattle.
    Ox
     

  3. Ronney

    Ronney Well-Known Member

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    Ox, all my pigs are behind elcectric, in this case mains. The perimeter fence is original and is three wire, the internal fences that we have since installed are two wire. Not one pig has ever escaped. Your elderly mentor was quite right. Pigs hate electric and once bitten, twice shy. As Donna has pointed out, it is a cheap and very effective way to go. It is also relatively quick and easy to install so that if you find you've made a botch up or it's not quite what you wanted, it's not so hard to uproot it and shift it.

    In most cases we have proper gates in place but electric spring "gates" are equally as effective.

    Cheers,
    Ronnie
     
  4. kountrycritters

    kountrycritters Active Member

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    Aug 23, 2005
    Location:
    pike county, ms
    hello,

    the area is about 1 1/2 acre with 3 strand barb wire (we orginally had holstein bull calfs in the area. since my pigs
    kept rooting out and knocking down the polls and field fence we had to do something when they started to wonder at 10:30 at night lol. they were always easy to catch back up but it was no fun when night time temp were
    in the upper 30"s. we assume the electric fence would be costly until i made a call to the local feed store. the charger was $69 it can cover up to 30 acreas plus wire
    and clips. we ran i strand of the internal wire about 10 inches off the ground. for some reason it dont effect the chickens, ducks, the goose did get zap but he was wet.
    so we are happy with our $126 investment which can be easy to move. our best investment is this fence and our pole barn (which over the years has easy been turn from rabbit barn then, chicken & turkey coops then pens for new born bottle calves and now being used to store feed, tractor, lawn mower and a nice space for our beagle dogs. the idea is to invest in something which can have many uses since everybody knows things are always changing
    down on the farm

    have a happy thanksgiving to all
     
  5. highlands

    highlands Well-Known Member

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    We use electric too. Works great. In some places we have just stone walls along the edges of the field and the animals pretty much stay in. This year we finally finished fencing in the south field with four wires of high tensile electric smooth wire. We want to get cattle to add to our farmstead and feel the need for a bit more fencing with them.
     
  6. John Schneider

    John Schneider Well-Known Member

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    Spruce Grove, Alberta
    Be careful in fencing your gates. I have seen that done in the past and then when it was time to load or sort...good luck getting them to cross through the gate. Electric works well...sometimes too well. Try pushing a 250 pound barrow through a gate that he doesn't want to go through and you will have a new appreciation for the word 'frustration'. I use regular swing gates with hog panel stapled to it. I dug a trench and buried a 2X6 until it was flush with the surface of the ground. This way, they can't root under your gate. Just a thought.
     
  7. bill not in oh

    bill not in oh Well-Known Member

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    LOL So true. I pen my piggers up in small (about ½ acre) paddocks so they denude and till the entire paddock for me to replant the next year. Works great - no grass, no weeds, they dig up rocks and roots.... BUT when it comes time to move them to a new paddock or to a loading area... HA - they just know we made that evil fence invisible, but it's still there! I usually have to place their feed in the new area for up to 12 hours before they will take the chance to cross the old fence line. (I gave up trying to push 250 lb porkers after the first one LOL)
     
  8. John Schneider

    John Schneider Well-Known Member

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    Laughing as I read your post Bill! Pushing those barrows across was attempted only after exhausting every other option I could think of! Good idea to simply let them cross on their own time with food as the incentive.
    I am planning the same sort of thing that you do next year in one of my overgrown fields. How many pigs do you run in your paddocks? and how long does it take for them to till 1/2 acre? Are they your feeder pigs? Sows?
     
  9. tresieg3

    tresieg3 Active Member

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    What about putting rings in their nose to stop the rooting? :1pig:
     
  10. John Schneider

    John Schneider Well-Known Member

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    I want them to root my pastures. They act as an aerator, fertilizer and rototiller all the while that they make meat! I will rotate them from pasture to pasture harrowing and seeding behind them. Once the new pastures are up and going, the other animals will rotationally graze...chickens, llamas, cows etc. Next year the rotation will start again except that the hogs will be allowed in each paddock for a much shorter amount of time so that they don't get a chance to root it up. Intensive rotational grazing is much healthier for the pastures.
     
  11. 34Case

    34Case Guest

    wwaaay back in the fifties dad made a pen around 50sq ft thereabouts. He bought around 30 wiened pigs and tried to feed them out. it wasnt free feed, and so they probaably got periodically hungry. AAlso, they probaably got borewd. Anyway, they learned to root a trench under the wire. (we had 2 wire). They rooted up the dirt on the far side of the trench and kept aat it till they had raisaed the dirt enoough to touch the wire and short it out, and awsay they went. Thinking back, I now imagine that they were intending to root under the fence and go under it, but instead, they went over it when it shorted it out. That was the first and last time anyone in the family ever used electric on hogs,,,, till now. Im saet to try it again, on a woods pasture of around 2 acres area, along with goats. I figure to run 3 lines. a foot apart using taped wire 1 1/2in wide. The total pasature will equal aaroound 3 acres or more. 1/3 completly open and the rest heavy woods, with a small pond in it. aaround 30ft round . Im buying wiened pigs and raising them up tto arround 175/200lbs. Ill buy aaround 3 doe goats and a buck and let them gfrow themselves into the pasture and watch how they eat at it as I dont know how many ital stand in stocking it
     
  12. romancemelisa

    romancemelisa Well-Known Member

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    ours are digging a trench under too, it is now deep enough for them to go under, they have yet to figure this out, they just sleep in it.