new cast iron question please help

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Ang in AZ, May 14, 2005.

  1. Ang in AZ

    Ang in AZ Active Member

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    new cast iron with the factory sent coating on it. what is the best way to remove this?

    Thanks, Ang in AZ
     
  2. moldy

    moldy Well-Known Member

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    It is probably just wax. Scrub it off with some hot water and soap, rinse well and dry well. Season with lard, shortening, or oil and bake at high temp for a while. Do this 2 or 3 times before using to help make it non-stick. You will occasionally have to re-season your pan to keep it that way. There should be instructions in or on the box.
     

  3. slimecoat

    slimecoat Member

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    Whipe with oil or lard then bake at 230 for 20 min. If you keep it oiled the cast iron will probably last a few hundred years!
     
  4. antiquestuff

    antiquestuff Well-Known Member

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    Is this the pre-seasoned stuff being made now or what? If so, maybe it's best to leave it? Otherwise, if it isn't pre-seasoned, go ahead and clean it--some good ideas on that here...
     
  5. deb

    deb Well-Known Member

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    If this is a Lodge "Logic" Cast iron pan, then it is pre-season and ready to use. The seasoning is just vegetable oil that has been baked on using a special process that Lodge developed.

    We switched from using teflon pans to using Lodge "logic" cast iron pans over 6 months ago and I have been quite pleased with them. The Lodge Logic pans are almost as non-stick as the 50+ yr old cast iron pots that I cooked with during college (I lived in a housing co-op and all of the kitchenware was original to the house).

    So if it says Lodge on the bottom side of the pan, you are ready to cook!

    BTW Lodge Manufacturing was stated by Joseph Lodge over 100 years old and everything is still made in TN.

    Here's their website:
    http://www.lodgemfg.com/

    If anyone is interested in buying Lodge cast iron pots and pans you see on the Lodge website, but you can't find them locally, then I would suggest that you look at Amazon.com. Amazon.com's prices are great and if your order is more than $25, then the shipping is free. We bought two pots along with a couple of books and got the free shipping. When our pots arrived we were completely stunned at how heavy they were! Amazon.com's actual shipping cost for the 2 pots was probably so high that they didn't make a whole lot on our purchase!

    Hope this helps.
    Deb
    in WI
     
  6. Oregonsparkie

    Oregonsparkie Well-Known Member

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    Just went to a dutch oven cooking demonstation today. This question was asked. Many cast iron manufacturers coat their iron with a wax. They recommend getting your BBQ really hot and putting the cast iron in the BBQ until the wax is gone, then season with vegetable oil and heat it to about 450 degrees intil the oil has carbonized.
     
  7. MaryNY

    MaryNY Well-Known Member

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    I have a lot of cast iron pans - from the tiny one that is for frying an egg or two, to a couple of "chicken fryers" with lids - and one huge one that takes two hands to lift (sometimes I think a small crane would help!!)! Oh, and I almost forgot the cast iron pancake griddle that fits over two burners on the stove !! Anyway, I know a little bit about "playing" with cast iron, and if I had a new one - instead of the ones my grandma and mother gave me - I'd wash it with soap and water and then call all the neighbors, relatives and friends and ask all of them over for a BIG breakfast of bacon and eggs and maybe a few hotcakes to go with them!! hehehe Actually, I have found that frying a pound of bacon in a new cast iron pan gives it a good start to getting a nice "teflon" type coating on it! Frying up some bacon is also a yummy way of replenishing the coating if you have to scrub the pan too much or it becomes rusty for some other reason. If I were going to season a new pan and didn't want to cook up all that bacon, I would use lard to coat it and either put it in the oven or on top of the stove or bbq for a while . . . I think the lard has salt in it like the bacon does, and I think the salt helps with the seasoning. I wouldn't use the vegetable oil (unless I were a vegan or something) because vegetable oil goes rancid so easily and gets gummy when it's been on the pans a while! Hope this helps! Lucky you, a new pan to play with!

    MaryNY
     
  8. Cabin Fever

    Cabin Fever Life NRA Member since 1976 Supporter

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    There are two sure-fire ways of removing any type of coating on cast iron:
    1. Build a campfire or a fire in your woodstove and through the cast iron into the fire and let it burn. Don't worry, this will not damage the cast iron.

    2. Place the cast iron in a self-cleaning oven and leave it there during an entire "self-cleaning" cycle.
     
  9. bgak47

    bgak47 Well-Known Member

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    Cast iron is very porous. You need to remove any coatings by high heat & then coat the utensil by frying a pound of bacon in it. When it is cool,rinse with hot water,wipe it throughly with a clean cloth, & dry it on a stove burner. NO SOAP,EVER! That's what my Great grandmother taught me & I have several of her skillets & they never stick!
     
  10. lvg4him

    lvg4him Member

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    I am unable to do the first one with campfire and am looking to do this with some cast iron I have.

    What do you do after the self-cleaning cycle before you re-season?

    Thanks!
     
  11. KathyJ

    KathyJ 1-5-acre dreamin'

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    not to steal the thread :D

    Do you do the same thing when the cast iron is rusted? I've picked up a few pieces here and there but was never quite sure what to do..... I had heard not to wash them, but they are quite ugly and gross.....

    thanks all
     
  12. Fla Gal

    Fla Gal Bunny Poo Monger Supporter

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    I don't think this is thread drift, I think it's pertinent to the question.

    Drag out your electric drill, put a wire wheel in the chuck and go to town with it knocking away rust. Then you'll probably have to use sandpaper, rough grit about 80, with your hand, to get to the places the wire wheel wouldn't get. Then you go for the lard and season your cast iron.

    Opps! forgot to add, I was always told you should rinse, not wash with soap, the cast iron in water before oiling it.
     
  13. Trisha in WA

    Trisha in WA Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I bought a whole big box of cast iron pans several years ago. They were very rusty too. I tried the wire wheel which was alot of work and for me didn't work very well. Then I got a tip to get some SOS pads and scrub them well with those. I was very suprised at how well the SOS pads got the rust off. Then I seasoned them very well in the oven. They have been great every since. I would only recomend this process if your pots and pans are rusty not to be done for just cleaning as others stated above...no soap after you get the rust off.
    Good luck.
    Trisha
     
  14. BearCreekFarm

    BearCreekFarm Well-Known Member

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    DH bought a bunch of cast iron skillets at an auction which were rusted. We put them in the oven and ran them through the self-clean cycle. That burns off everything that is going to come off! Then we scrubbed them out with hot water, rubbed them with Crisco (lard is definitely better but we did not have any), and put them in the oven for a couple of hours at 300 degrees. Repeat the Crisco/oven cycle two more times and you will have a great start- then fry the pound of bacon. After that all we do is wipe them out while they are still warm. If we occassionally cook something that is won't wipe off with a paper towel we heat some water in the skillet and scrub it out with a plastic brush. We now have about 17 pieces of cast iron in various stages of seasoning.
     
  15. Canucklehead

    Canucklehead Active Member

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    Not sure about getting the gunk off... many posts here alrady explain that. My Dad gave me my first cast iron pan. He has very bad arthritis and could lift it any more.

    Best pan ever... I use it for everthing. It was clean when I got it but I cooked nothing but bacon and chicken in it for the first few months. After I'm done cooking, I dump a cup or two of water in the pan to loosen the gunk off while the pan is still hot. Then I wash in hot water and no soap.

    The pan is now better than teflon. I can cook eggs, sunny side up with a small amount of oil and no sticking. I love my pan. I wish I had more.

    Of course this is just a repeat of what everyone else posted but I had to give my praise for cast iron ;)
     
  16. lvg4him

    lvg4him Member

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    I hope it is ok to ask here, but how do you cook scrambled eggs in a cast iron skillet and NOT have the eggs stick like crazy? And what is the best way to clean the skillet once you have has your breakfast? I feel like I scrub and scrub with my plastic scrapper and the egg never comes all the way off. Thanks!
     
  17. BearCreekFarm

    BearCreekFarm Well-Known Member

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    If your eggs are sticking then your skillet hasn't been seasoned properly. Try reseasoning and hold off on cooking any eggs until after you have seasoned and cooked a few pounds of bacon in it. My mom gave me one of her #10 Wagner skillets which had not been used for a few years. I re-seasoned it but the first few times I tried eggs they stuck. I finally gave up and reseasoned it again, and after a few more pounds of bacon it was perfect- I cook omelets in it now.

    As mentioned already- if food does stick try heating an inch or so of water in the skillet, then scrub with a plastic or nylon brush. That always works for me. Then be sure to put some lard or crisco on it and heat it on the stovetop for a few minutes. Let it cool, wipe off any excess lard, you're good to go.
     
  18. BlueRidge

    BlueRidge Well-Known Member

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    Wash with oil (such as olive oil) and scrub with SALT. Abrasive enough for most stuck food, but will not hurt your seasoning.
     
  19. Yvonne's hubby

    Yvonne's hubby Murphy was an optimist ;) Staff Member

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    With new cast it could be anything from preseasoning to cosmolene, if you arent sure, as several others have posted, burn it off in campfire, oven or whatever you can, oil it up and reseason it, two or three times wont hurt a thing. The one thing I havent seen in the posts is something I was taught at a very early age. Save back one of those strips of bacon, or dip a paper towel in a bit of bacon grease, once the pan has been rinsed, wiped or otherwise cleaned after use, go over it with a very lite coat of this bacon grease before storing it away. when you take it out next time, wipe it out a bit to remove any dust that may have accumilated and its ready to go again. this will prevent any rust from forming during the storage time, especially so in humid climates and with pans that you dont use regularly. Happy cooking!
     
  20. skruzich

    skruzich Well-Known Member

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    Ive got a 24" x 12" griddle that my grandma gave me. I hven't seen another like it. Wonder if anyone makes them anymore
    I wish i had the chicken fryer that she used to have That sucker could fry 3 or 4 chickens.