New? but not, What stove would you buy if you were going to buy a new one?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by braggscowboy, Feb 6, 2004.

  1. braggscowboy

    braggscowboy Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Hello, I am new in asking a question, but not new to the sight. I have been looking in for some time and have found that there is a lot of good information here. I am a science teacher, and have been for some time and am about to retire soon. I have done a few things in my work career. I was drafted during the Viet Nam era, and was a police officer when drafted. I have been a teacher for 27 years. Having lived in the country all of my life I sometimes could share some information, and have seen some here that I have used.
    I have a Buck Stove that I have had for several years and has been, and still is a good stove, but is very dirty to clean. DUST everwhere! I also use a wood cookstove on occasion. I Have a Sweetheart from Leheman's. I have looked on the net at Quadrafire, Osburn an some of the other brands. Not any, of which are found around here. I want one with an ash pan or means to clean without the dust. Also a good source reasonable in which to order, if anyone knows of such a place. I look forward to participation on the sight from time to time. I feel as I know some of you already.
    Thanks ahead of time for any information.
     
  2. Simple Sam

    Simple Sam Member

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    Hi cowboy,
    I bought a Vermont Castings Defiant model woodstove last Oct. It has a pull out ash drawer, and often heats my cabin too warm, even with a small fire! Nice problem to have I guess. I would recommend it to anyone. I did a lot of research before I bought it, and feel like I got a cadillac stove.
    Good luck to you,
    Sam
     

  3. big rockpile

    big rockpile If I need a Shelter

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    We was just looking at stoves today.Found some I think we will really like their on the high dollar side but I think well worth it called Hearth Stone.

    big rockpile
     
  4. My hubby sells Shanendoah stoves (round and rectangular) @ $595 & $695 RESPECTIvely at work. Not cast iron...steel with pullout ashtray...wood or coal brick (soapstone lined) half way up. Damper on feed door and on chimney makes it quite efficient. We have a gate around ours for young children ($50). We have the round( 27 yo) @ camp and rectangle(20yo) at home. We do blacken each Fall. Will last overnight if well banked and good to make dinner on. We have only used wood but have shaker grate (coal). Camp is -20F in winter at 1500 square feet and home is 2000 square ft (-10F ) with rectangular (200 gal. oil 4 cord wood...80F average)....we dry all laundry on the gate. Cheap stove and efficient heat. Keep chimney clean!
     
  5. I'm with you, Simpleman. I love my Vermont Casting. I've had one for over 20 years now and it is still my stove of choice. Jean from Ky.
     
  6. sport240

    sport240 Guest

    Well...by reading your question many stoves out there could probably do the trick, even less expensive ones that do the simple task of heating. Your local ag-supply or hardware store could probably be a good source.

    I will be building a log cabin soon (yes my homestead!) and will be putting in a Pacific Energy Summit Classic (http://www.pacificenergy.bc.ca/summit_classic.html)

    It may look fancy all dressed in red with it's enamel finish, but it'll get 75%+ efficiency on cord wood, will heat up to 3000 sq/ft and has an overnight burn system (Extended Burn Technology) that'll get you thru the night and even save you some wood.

    There are thousands of stoves out there, but this is the one for me...thought I would pass it along...

    Sport240
     
  7. heidith

    heidith Well-Known Member

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    Jotul. We're thrilled with it.
     
  8. braggscowboy

    braggscowboy Well-Known Member Supporter

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    As I said I am new to this thread, but knew I would get some good advice.
    I think that it sounds like either of the stove mentioned would be good and do a good job. Now if only I can find a supplier where I can order one. Does anyone have any idea where I can find one on line?
    Thanks again for the information. I hope to become a part of the panel here and I think that there is a wealth/storehouse of information here all wraped up into one site.
    braggscowboy
     
  9. Jane in southwest WI

    Jane in southwest WI Well-Known Member

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    We got our stove from Lehmans, it's a Waterford Trinity model. It has a pull out ash pan, side door for loading as well as front glass door. It also has a cooking surface and warming shelves. It does a great job of heating our cabin, in fact it does get too warm sometimes. The only complaint DH makes about it is that some of the knobs and finishes on some of the hardware don't all match (the handles on the doors are wooden, the damper has a black knob, the door to the ashpan has a chrome handle, etc).

    Overall it is a nice looking stove though, and should last our lifetimes if we can replace what parts might wear out, or at least get them made somewhere.
    When we moved here and met our neighbor at her house for the first time, we saw that she has the exact same stove, only ours is blue and hers is green.
     
  10. A heavy steel Earth Stove heats my shop and adjoining guest quarters. Accepts good sized chunks and consumes the wood completely leaving a soft powder. I burn assorted wood but keep the pipe clean.
     
  11. FLFKY

    FLFKY Active Member

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    Central KY
    Bought a Jotul FC 500 2 years ago. Those Norwegians know how to heat!

    The unit was pricey, ($1700) but worth it. It looks great, has a side door, glass front, low clearance options, and has a 60000 BTU rating.

    I heat my entire house which is 1800+ sq. ft. with this thing. I guess you could say I'm pretty satisfied.
     
  12. rambler

    rambler Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I have been researching a wood boiler furnace all winter, and have found the wood heating companies pretty good at responding to email questions, as well as having their products online with specs - since it is so hard to go window shopping locally for these somewhat specialty items.

    If you go to ww.google.com (or search engine of your choice) and type in the name of the stove you are looking for - should find a web site. You will be surprised to find there are several dealers near you - just not a highly advertised or stocked kind of item, but the dealer network is there. Many plumbing & heating firms have aligned themselves with various of these wood heating manufaturers.

    You can also search for just 'wood stove' but be prepared to look through a lot of stuff! :)

    --->Paul
     
  13. Runners

    Runners A real Quack!

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  14. Doc

    Doc Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I am interested in a new woodstove, too. I've read that a load of wood in a Vermont Castings stove can last up to 14 hours.

    Can anyone verify that? And also, those of you with the Jotul?

    My woodstove burns wood like it is a weed. I want to find one that doesn't take so much wood (loading it), and that will heat about 1200 sq ft.
     
  15. Used to run a Vermont Casting vigilant in my living room and I have never had a fire last 14 hours. It might make 8 hours on a good day on smolder mode. The Defiant is a bigger model and might make the full 14. Biggest problem with my Vigilant was it was prone to chimney fires. When you shut this stove down, it goes into airtight mode and can really creosote up the chimney. Mine did not have an ash pan and removal of ash was done through the two front doors. Messy and you needed to let the stove go out to remove the ashes, which needed to be done every other day when you are running the stove 24/7. The inside cast iron baffles were also quite thin. The back baffle in mine was warped after the first year of use and needed to be replaced by year 7. Same held true for the small piece of casting that kept the ashes in the stove when you opened the front doors. This was probably my fault, running the stove too hot to heat up the room and dropping armfuls of wood through the top door. I probably should have purchased the defiant. I did like it better then the Jotul it replaced. I now have an outdoor wood furnace and will never go back to the stoves.
     
  16. FLFKY

    FLFKY Active Member

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    In reply to Guest, my Jotul can last between 7-8 hours with the damper turned down and the stove totally filled.
     
  17. rambler

    rambler Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I don't think that is practical for _any_ stove. I generally hear 7-8 hours. Even if it were possible, consider how little heat output you would get, if you could bank the fire down that low. there are only so many BTU's in a load of wood, if you want to stretch it to 14 hours, not much per hour.... Sure would be hard on the chimney, creosote & all.

    If you absolutely need that kind of time between loads, you'll have to switch to a water system, either indoor like the Tarm with an extra water storage tank; or an outdoor with the extremely large & inefficient wood box.

    --->Paul
     
  18. Doc

    Doc Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I'm just reporting what one of the brand name makers of a soapstone stove says in the ad: "14 hours"....

    I don't need to go that long, but it would help not to have to get up every 1/2 hour and stoke the fire, or add wood. And yes, I have the air intake on as low as they will go. The stove I have is an old Huntsman that puts out the heat, but really burns wood. Lots. Far more than I think most do -- particular now that I've read what some of the other stoves burn from this thread.
     
  19. flannelberry

    flannelberry Pure mischief

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    We have a Blaze King - catalytic - that will be getting consigned this spring/summer to be replaced by the old faithful Pacific Energy. I can't say enough good things about those stoves; we've always had them in the past and are going back.

    My advice about stove shopping is talk to people who are using the stove in as close to your own circumstances as you can. We talked to tonnes of people who loved their BK and decided to splurge (they are one of the most expensive on the market). We hate it - and after the chimney fire this morning, it's going to be gone. We realized that we talked to people who used it as a supplement to other heat sources or who had a totally different house lay out than our own.

    The main thing we realized, especially after this morning - is that there is no exchange for the security you get buying a new stove from a dealer and having everything installed. We have a huge warranty on our pipe and stove - no questions asked. If there'd been any damage we wouldn't have been out the many thousands we were envisioning - nice to know. We also found out we can consign it/sell it for about $500 less than it is new - not what we paid but what it's going for. It will likely sell this spring for about $500 more than we paid...

    We also realized that we are not cut out for the catalytic stoves... but that's a whole other thread ;)
     
  20. silverbackMP

    silverbackMP Well-Known Member

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    Old antique round oak pot belly; wouldn't have anything but. They don't have pull out ash draweres (could probably have something fabricated).