New and Pig tail question

Discussion in 'Pigs' started by tiergarten-CO, Dec 24, 2004.

  1. tiergarten-CO

    tiergarten-CO Well-Known Member

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    Dec 24, 2004
    Location:
    Colorado
    Hello,
    I am new to the board but have read for a few weeks already. So much info on this site. I have a question. A few weeks ago we had a minus zero temeratures and a couple days later I noticed the bottom half of the tails on my two pigs ave fallen off. Should I be concerned? I have read a lot about pigs but am new to everything. Any ideas and tips would be appreciated.
    Thanks in advance
    tony-CO
     
  2. Boleyz

    Boleyz Prognosticator, Artist

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    KY
    Sounds like frostbite. You need to provide adequate bedding for hogs if they're outside. A windbreak with straw for bedding will suffice. If you can get a couple of old panels from a grain bin and bolt them together and put them in the pen to form a roof, it need not be more than 3 feet high. Close off one end with some lumber or back it up to a board fence, pack it with straw, and they'll do fine all winter. As far as the tails go, we always crop them off to about 1 " when they're born. We cut their teeth and their tails immediately after birth. They'll do fine without their tails, but you need to be sure they don't chew on the stumps of each other. That could lead to infection.
     

  3. tiergarten-CO

    tiergarten-CO Well-Known Member

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    Dec 24, 2004
    Location:
    Colorado
    thanks for the reply.I had a 3 sided shelter w/roof that blew out of the pen from the 70 mile/hour winds.Me and the wife could not lift it back over the fence till the wind stoped.
     
  4. Ronney

    Ronney Well-Known Member

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    I would suspect frostbite as well and I doubt you will have any problems - the stump will heal and they will be as right as rain.

    But why cut off their tails? In this country it is done in high-density piggeries where boredom can lead to fighting and bad behaviour and even then there is a growing trend to leave them intact. Small breeders or outdoor breeders, leave the tails alone. And it's nice to see the curly tail of a healthy pig. :) I haven't docked, castrated or clipped the teeth of my piglets in nearly 30 years when I finally worked out that there was no need for it and I was wasteing my time and putting the piglets through stress they didn't need.

    Cheers,
    Ronnie
     
  5. highlands

    highlands Walter Jeffries Staff Member Supporter

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    Frost bite. Protection from the wind is the most important issue. Then having a nice deep bedding pack - lots of hay. How many pigs do you have? Do they sleep together? Being together lets them share body heat.

    We too get high winds and very low temps here but I've never had frost bite on the pigs. We just have three sided sheds (solid roof, hay bale walls) and dens I dug into the side of the hill. Those both work well. I have had roosters sit up high in the wind to crow and get frost bit combs - silly birds.