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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
darn cut & paste doesnt work right with my phone and youtube.

This is the shotgun one. The other link is about an even worse case.

 

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I'm starting to think that we don't need a gun background check at all ... perhaps a universal common sense check?

I'd be embarrassed beyond belief and hoping to keep my name out of the papers (not looking to sue), after having caused trouble like that in public. All my friends would bring out the 2x4 training reinforcement aids ... those that didn't die laughing, first.
 

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I find this interesting. Legally, an employer can't ask if you have ever been arrested. They can, however, in most states asked if you've ever been convicted. Arrested vs conviction, that's two totally different things.
At my current position, my employer imposed a new policy several years ago that if any employee is convicted of anything other than a minor traffic ticket, we are required to report the conviction to HR or risk termination.
 

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I would like to see where those laws are at. Never heard of them here. But even if you have that in your state, doesn't stop the government (like licensing agencies) from asking.
Here the federal info on criminal history and employment. This doesn't cover occupational licensing for specific jobs. There are also many states that do not allow questions are criminal history
These states limit the time frame that can be reported (7 years) California, Kansas, Maryland, Massachusetts, Montanan, New Mexico, New York, New Hampshire and Washington.
And a growing thing in the U.S is "ban the box" which simply is that employers can't ask about convictions until they have extended an offer for employment. In other words, they can't make a hiring decision on your conviction, but can consider it later in the process to determine if it is related to requirements for the job. For example, someone with a conviction for fraud would not be hired to work at a bank.

Sorry, I'm an HR person. I live this stuff every day.
 

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At my current position, my employer imposed a new policy several years ago that if any employee is convicted of anything other than a minor traffic ticket, we are required to report the conviction to HR or risk termination.
Yep, there are many companies that do have a policy like yours. Here's a recent write up about that. From the SHRM org: an employee may be suspended or terminated for an arrest so long as the conduct for which the employee was arrested is relevant and makes the individual unfit for the position, Examples may include a school bus driver who is arrested for drunk driving, or an employee of a daycare center who is arrested for sexual molestation of a child. However, if an employee such as a bus driver or daycare worker instead were arrested for disorderly conduct, the charge would not likely be considered job-related nor would it likely indicate a significant probable safety or security risk to others. Therefore, the employer might not have a justifiable defense for taking any employment action against the individual as a result of the arrest.
 
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