Neutered angoras?

Discussion in 'Rabbits' started by minnikin1, Dec 31, 2006.

  1. minnikin1

    minnikin1 Shepherd

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    Does anybody out there ever have their bunnies fixed?
    I want to keep 2 bucks as companions and was thinking they'd be less prone to stinkiness and or fighting.
     
  2. lonelyfarmgirl

    lonelyfarmgirl Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Iused to volunteer at a vet and watched the vet spay a bunny. He told me that bunnys are risky because they are super sensitive to anesthetic. your bucks will still be stinky, nuetered or not. its because they pee out the side of their cage, and the fact that their urine has lots of calcium in it. also, if you got them as babies so they could grow up together, they would probably be ok. thats all I know.
     

  3. Honorine

    Honorine Carpe Vinum Supporter

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    Even brother bucks raised together will eventually fight, there's no way to keep intact bucks together once they mature. Many pet people neutor theirs, and they seem to be able to keep them together, barring personality conflicts. Farmgirl is right, rabbits can't tolerate anesthesia well, there's always the possibility of losing them, so I'd try to find a small animal vet to do the procedure. As for urine stinkiness I had a good bit of success feeding Purina show formula, it has Yerba Schigidera(sp?) in it, and claims to cut down on the strong urine smell, and it did. Interesting thought, since you spin, would neutoring them cause them to grow more wool? Spayed dogs tend to really coat up(I have shelties) wonder if an angora rabbit would?
     
  4. delphinium

    delphinium Well-Known Member

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    I neutered my pet male angoras, left the females intact. The procedure for the males is much quicker and less invasive, so less time under anesthesia. I work for a vet, so was there for the process. Mine are hutched outdoors, but I do think the urine has less odor since the neutering.
     
  5. rabbitgal

    rabbitgal Ex-homesteader

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    Bucks ARE a bit smellier than does.

    I'm not too familiar with neutering rabbits, but I do know that you usually can't keep adult males together. I have a couple of unrelated junior bucks that are best buddies, but the one rabbit has a very gentle, "submissive" personality. Most bucks will seriously injure, possibly kill, each other if you try to keep them together.

    According to my vet, the neutering procedure for rabbits is a bit more involved...they can draw their testes into their abdominal cavity, so when he neuters a rabbit, he sutures those openings shut. I don't know if that's standard procedure or not...he's conscientious, but he doesn't get a lot of rabbits.

    There's a lot of info on the HRS site (www.rabbit.org) about spaying and neutering, plus keeping rabbits together for companionship. They're anti-breeder, but if you can get past the bias, there's good information there. :)

    Good luck, I'd love to know what you decide to do and how it works out for you.
     
  6. minnikin1

    minnikin1 Shepherd

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    The reason I asked was that i just lost a buck, and I now have a solitary rabbit left.

    Those 2 lived in the house and were quite attached to one another (father and son). Maybe the breed influenced this part of their temperament? (germanX)

    Both bucks kept their homes much cleaner when they were apart than when housed together. On the flip side, I didn't have to spend as much time with them when they had each other for companionship.
    I chose to put up with a bit more mess rather than have guilt over keeping lonely animals.

    I want to get the remaining buck a new companion, and thought maybe if he was fixed, he'd be more likely to accept a new friend. But I've looked into it and the cost of having it done is just outrageous.

    Maybe I can buy back one of his siblings. I'll have to call some folks who bought buns from that litter.

    Thanks to all for the input.
     
  7. Somerhill

    Somerhill Well-Known Member

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    I've never neutered a rabbit, since my bucks are kept for breeding. However, I have talked with another breeder who does. She does the procedure herself - there is a book published by the ARBA that tells how, and I think there are internet sites that give the procedure as well. Seems to be fairly simple if you have the nerves for it.
    I am told by this and other breeders that neutered males do indeed produce more fiber than intact. Also, they are likely to live longer, and if its done when they are young, it keeps the bucks from spraying themselves and others.
    One drawback to housing angoras together in cages is that they tend to lay on eachother, causing matting, and also they groom oneanother, trimming those lovely coats. I don't know how to get around that. :shrug:

    Lisa at Somerhill
    www.somerhillfarm.com