Needing bailer help

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by FarmboyBill, Jul 17, 2006.

  1. FarmboyBill

    FarmboyBill Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Whats a compression stroke in the chamber of a square bailer? Is it the harder time I have turning the flywheel to get the plunger to go down the plunger chute. and why is one hard and ones not? Im getting ready to time the needles to the bailer, and there $150ea, so Im wanting to be sure of , even what im pretty sure im sure of. By the way, its a 1960 140W Case bailer
     
  2. wilderness1989

    wilderness1989 Well-Known Member

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  3. rambler

    rambler Well-Known Member Supporter

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    As mentioned, you want a manual if you don't have one.

    A 'stroke' is 1/2 of a revolution. As the plunger goes back to the tail of the baler, that is the compression stroke - where it compresses the hay into a flake of a bale. As the plunger is pulled back to the front of the baler it doesn't do anything but make room for more hay - so it turns freely.
     
  4. Ross

    Ross Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    The fly wheel should be hardest to turn as you are bringing the plunger arm up so the plunger will be at the very front of the chamber about to go towards the rear. It will be at the far end when the arm is fully extended and the flywheel is just about to get very easy as the arm drops to start pulling the plunger to the front.
     
  5. Hammer4

    Hammer4 Well-Known Member

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    www.ytmag.com has forums for older tractors and implements, ask over there for help on your baler if needed.

    The compression stroke is when the plunger is cutting more hay and shoving it into the bale that is forming in the bale chamber. If there is hay in the baler from the last time you baled, that will be when the plunger is pushing against that hay.....

    Most balers have a safety stop to stop the baler if the needles are in the up position, make sure yours is working properly. Keep in mind also that if you have the old needles and they are bent or broken, they can most likley be welded and/or heated and straightened.....

    Normally timing is set on these by turning the flywheel to position the plunger in certain positions, take measurements, put the drive chains on...but you really need a manual for all that.
     
  6. wy_white_wolf

    wy_white_wolf Just howling at the moon

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  7. Ross

    Ross Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    Ebay has lots of manuals listed, I get almost all of mine there. not sure about this baler but it'd be worth a look.
     
  8. ace admirer

    ace admirer Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I agree with others, you need a manual and you need to fully understand it before you mess around with a bailer. its one of the most dangerous pieces of equipment you'll find on a farm.
     
  9. FarmboyBill

    FarmboyBill Well-Known Member Supporter

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    But it dosent tell me which or what is a compression stroke. Thanks for the help
     
  10. Beststash

    Beststash Well-Known Member

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    FarmboyBill - timing a square baler is a booger (did you break a bolt and them move the flywheel??)....before you put in new neddles - disconnect the PTO from your tractor and then slowly turn the flywheel (keep hold of it as you slowly turn it) and you will easily see the compression stroke....immediately afterwards the needles should move up from the bottom. Even if it looks like everything is OK continue to turn the flywheel until your needles made at least 4 or 5 cycles. One notch off and you will break a needle.
     
  11. Ross

    Ross Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    The compresion stroke is when the plunger is as far back to the bale chamber as it can be. Turning the fly wheel will get hard as the plunger comes forward and then easier and easier as it moves to the back. You'll need help to watch where the plunger is and to hold the fly wheel. And Ace is right a baler can shear off body parts, or break bones very easily, even manually powered. Experienced help would be great if you can find it!
     
  12. ace admirer

    ace admirer Well-Known Member Supporter

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    ok, i'm sorry, the compression stroke would be the half cycle that the plunger and platten is traveling toward the rear of the bale chamber or towards the rear of the bailer itself...the stroke that hay would be compressed into the chamber.....as others have said the timming of the needles would be during the dwell time when the platten is fully into the chamber and not moving.
     
  13. FarmboyBill

    FarmboyBill Well-Known Member Supporter

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    A chain broke that ran from the flywheel to the knotter actuator. I assume the needles was inside when that happened, and when the plunger pulled out the needles went with it. The actuator? has a cam that I need to look at as it has a slot for a rollar to fall into and I need to see if thats worn, plus look at the rollar. Im replacing a spring that I cant find anywhere cause of size and spriginess on it, and that , according to the book should cover any and all think\gs that would make it break. Put on new #50 chain. Its an engine bailer, case 4 cyl air cooled. I got the mag back last week after having it looked over. Hadnt ran in 3 yrs, and wasnt throwing any spark. Now I got to try 3 ways outa 4 of seting it. Tried one tonight, I put my hammermill belt on it and turned it that way while trying the wires all the way around, but it wouldnt do anything, so ill rotate it again tomorrow
     
  14. rambler

    rambler Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Could help more if it were a NH baler, but don't know anything about Case.

    On NH you generally want the plunger arm pointing up to the sky, between 2 punch marks on the fram. Then line up the punch marks back on the 'actuator' and fram, & put the chain on. Case, I'm sure, will be different.

    That http://www.ytmag.com place mentioned will be able to help you, implement area probably.

    --->Paul