Need woodstove advise

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by mamajohnson, Sep 10, 2005.

  1. mamajohnson

    mamajohnson Knitting Rocks! Supporter

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    I have located a smallish wood burning cookstove. And I want it bigtime. One reason being, with oil/gas prices going up I think we need something like this to heat with this winter.(and cook on) So, everything is a go and I am thrilled and DH is ok with it. Until I told him how big the fire box is... or isnt..... It is about 5" square and 15" long. DH says that we cant get this stove because it will never heat the house. Now, we live in Northeast Texas. No major cold here. Just about 20 or 30 degrees at the coldest. and that isn't for any extended time. The house is only 900 sq feet, and the stove would be in about the middle of the house.
    Ok, I need either some one here to tell me WHY this wont work, or I need ammo to tell DH WHY it will work. He is forever the pesimist, me the optimist (who cant spell) and we bash heads often. I want this stove, and feel a bit pig headed over it. It is only 699.00, a bargain from all I can tell. Brand new, not quiet as tall as a gas stove, as wide. The oven is smallish, probably big enough for a roasting hen or pan of biscuits, or maybe a large loaf of bread is all.... there is room for about 4 large pans on top, and two smaller ones with a warming section over the whole thing. I'm in love, even tho it is small, and feel like it will be sufficient for our mild winters. So, someone talk me down before I go full tilt with DH..... :help:
     
  2. Cabin Fever

    Cabin Fever Life NRA Member since 1976 Supporter

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    Is your priority cooking or heating the house? I think your husband is right. If you use it just to cook, it will not heat the house. It will provide heat, but probably not enough. If it did provide enough heat to heat the whole house, there is no way that you're gonna want to be cooking over it....too hot. If you really want to save $$$ by cutting back on oil and gas, invest that $699 in a real wood-heating stove. You can still use a wood heating stove to cook stews, soups, chilis, etc on.
     

  3. Bruce in NE

    Bruce in NE Well-Known Member

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    I agree. I've heated with a wood heater for years and also have had a wood cook stove. Using a cookstove as a heater, you'll be up all night shivering while you toss little sticks into it. If you're really serious about heating your house, get a wood heater with a flat surface that you can cook on. I also cook right inside my wood stove, putting a grate over coals to roast stuff...
     
  4. Cabin Fever

    Cabin Fever Life NRA Member since 1976 Supporter

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    Ya know, Bruce, I've often wondered if I could use my dutch ovens inside of my woodstove once the firewood burned down to coals. If a person could, I don't suppose he'd have to cover the top of the dutch oven with coals like ya would when baking outdoors. I think I might give it a try this winter.
     
  5. whodunit

    whodunit Well-Known Member Supporter

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    We heated an old 500 sq ft. trailer with an antique wood cookstove. It did fine, but it had to be fed every 20-25 minutes or the fire would go out.

    The wood had to be small enought to fit, and that can be extra work to split your wood rounds into the right size pieces.

    We just bought an Englander wood stove to heat our current house (1000 sq. ft.). It was on sale for $599.

    You can get used wood stoves in the $200 range, so if you can afford to, buy both and see if you can use one chimney for the two (opinions on this vary).

    By the way, if you don't have a chimney, plan on this project costing at least a couple hundred dollars more, if you do the work yourself.
     
  6. BeesNBunnies

    BeesNBunnies Schnauzer nut

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    First I'd like to point out that with ANY wood burning stove you are gonna have to get up and feed it in the middle of the night if you want it to stay warm all night. I heated/cooked with a woodburning cook stove for several years. It will run you out of the house it heats so well. A wood cook stove has a whole lot of bulk that heats up even though it has a small fire box. I think you are gonna pay too much for your stove unless it is fancy. You can get a good solid older nonfancy stove in ark or MO for a lot less. Last one I bought was $100. Since I grew up in the area you are in I'm familiar with the heating needs. Wood cook stove should do fine.....especially if you are smarter than I am and can figure out that there is a lever at the back that will make the warmth/smoke circulate around the oven. Does that ever make a difference! Nearly froze to death until one day I was cleaning behind the stove and found that little lever :p
     
  7. antiquestuff

    antiquestuff Well-Known Member

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    You should be able to find an older cookstove for much less than that. Just be sure the firebox and everything is intact, give it good clearance, and be sure it's kept clean of creosote.
     
  8. rambler

    rambler Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Nice cookstove - bit pricy but the chimney cost will make the stove look cheap.

    To heat a house, you will need to feed it all the time, and make a lot of very small wood. If your main task is to heat the house, I would look for bigger box.

    --->Paul
     
  9. texican

    texican Well-Known Member

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    With a 5" opening x 15" long woodbox, SOMEBODY's gonna stay warm, chopping and splitting all of that wood to fit into that tiny little hole.

    I built a wood burning stove, with a 14" square opening for wood, and it heats my 1400' home quite well.

    Think you're talking apples and oranges... you want a cookstove, and hubby wants a woodstove..

    I live in ne texas also, and I've quit cutting firewood, as I can never find a cold enough day or night to burn it all...........so much firewood in the past has just rotted back into the soil.....and I've got several thousands of cords available within a mile of the house, but if you can't 'use it', it'll just rot...good for the forest ecosystem, what's left anyway...

    did you find your stove at a local store?
     
  10. diane

    diane Well-Known Member

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    If the issue is you want a wood cookstove and the honey wants to heat with it, I would suggest getting a Kitchen Queen. It has a very large firebox, lots of cooking surface and an oven that really bakes nicely. It hold a fire all night, and even better you can put a few chunks of coal on it if you want to and it will really heat well. All my Amish neighbors have them and we just recently installed one. I can't hardly wait for winter. :D
     
  11. mamajohnson

    mamajohnson Knitting Rocks! Supporter

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    I guess your right, apples and oranges.... :( But, like you said, it shouldnt take much wood to keep us warm. We even went part of one winter without any heat,,, well one little electric heater was all we had. Never got cold...
    Maybe I do just want to have a cookstove....ok, I do! :eek:
    Yeah, the 699. is pricey, it is the only cookstove in this area, and it is at a local store. I have looked for stoves, just arent many around here. The one I really really like is up north, costs 1500. and shipping would be a killer! We cant afford to drive up into ark or missouri, our 3/4ton would use a ton of gas!!! We can spend the money on a good plain wood burning stove, only thing is, we are adding onto the house and intend to buy for that part anyway... I guess if we get tooo cold we can pull out the old dearborn heater and hook into the propane.
    Geez, I hate to tell him he may be right! :eek:
    I may have to cook up a bit of crow......
     
  12. raymilosh

    raymilosh Well-Known Member

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    I cook on and heat my house in NC with a wood cookstove. I searched extensively for a woodstove designed to heat as well as cook and found several with large enough fireboxes. Namely, Pioneer Maid, Baker's Choice and Waterford Stanley. There are likely others, too. the overall wight of cookstoves gives them a huge advantage as far as whole house heating goes. I let mine go out every night rather than restoking it, but it is still warm come morning. I have found it WAY easier to heat the house with a cookstove than with my fancy airtight woodheater. My house is 900 sq ft and is well insulated and has heavy curtains across every window, though. I'd recommend spending some time and money on that stuff, too.
    ray
     
  13. mamajohnson

    mamajohnson Knitting Rocks! Supporter

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    well, I guess the bottom line will be drawn tomarrow or the next day. I have shown DH all ya'lls responses (thnx so much!) and we will go check it out in person later this week and reach a final decision. I still want it. I dont think he does. Maybe I can end up with a fancier stove in the long run...
    thnx lots ya'll, do appreciate all the input. (still hate to say I may be wrong!!)