need to identify peach worms

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by mamagoose, Jul 3, 2006.

  1. mamagoose

    mamagoose Well-Known Member

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    My peaches are ripening now and "99%" we've picked so far have worms. We pretty much neglected the tree until the branches were so heavy they needed support. We've had early spring worms every year in that tree (tent caterpillars maybe?), but these are worms now, looks maggot-like. Same? different? When/how did they get inside the peaches? Do they stunt the peaches? If I knew when and what to expect earlier in the season we could combat them, I hope. TIA!
     
  2. tyusclan

    tyusclan Well-Known Member

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    If you have tiny holes on the outside of the peach, a little drop of juice at the hole, and the worm inside the peach you have coddling moth larvae in your peaches. The only effective way to combat them is spray, and it's too late this year. You have to spray when the buds swell, but before they open. Hold off while they're in bloom so you won't discourage the bees and other pollinators, and then spray every 7-10 days as the fruit matures. There are some good organic sprays. Gardens Alive! has some, and you can usually find some at your local feed store.
     

  3. mamagoose

    mamagoose Well-Known Member

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    Thanks, tyusclan. I was sure that it was too late and that the larvae are maturing. Well, I guess if I have them this year, I'll probably have them forever. I've looked up some info on coddling moth. Not all of the ones with worms look like they have a hole, but it may be just tiny. It does seem like the firmer the peach, the less chance they have one inside, but I was trying to pick all the least firm ones first. *Good* to know that there are 3 generations of them during the summer, *sigh*. We lost our producing apple tree last fall and this peach tree is the only mature tree fruit this year. Deer, squirrels and crows had been the pests of this tree up until now. We think we have the deer and squirrel problem solved with a 4-foot fence and a pair of geese in the fenced off area (it's away from the house several hundred feet). I put a netting over the branches and so far the crows have stayed away. One year, I had all intention of coming home after work and start harvesting hundreds of peaches, but the crows had devoured them in just 8 short hours! (We think the squirrels just gnaw at them, unless I have my critters backwards and they were the burglars). Looks like with 25 fruit trees planted, I'd better put in a big order to combat these pests, as I see they like apples and pears as well. I'm still getting about half of a salvagable peach and I've sent out warnings so no one justs bite into one! This a.m. I peeled the first 2 I picked for my oatmeal (with Hickory nuts and honey, yum) and they are sans worms! Thanks again!

    As an afterthought, the 3-generation thing - that might explain why so many peaches fall off the tree immaturely throughout the summer.
     
  4. susieM

    susieM Well-Known Member

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    I can't help you, but here is a joke:

    What's worse than finding a worm in a peach?

    Finding half a worm.
     
  5. mamagoose

    mamagoose Well-Known Member

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    Oh, Susie, how funny, I hope that doesn't happen!
     
  6. jnap31

    jnap31 garden guy

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    They did a number on our peach trees also, last year the deer ate them all and now that they are tall enough to keep the deer off the worms got 50% DW says.
     
  7. zealot

    zealot Soli Deo Gloria

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    Either coddling moth or the Oriental Fruit Moth. We have those on our trees too.