Need to band the boy

Discussion in 'Sheep' started by MN Mom, May 19, 2006.

  1. MN Mom

    MN Mom Well-Known Member

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    Our little boy needs to get banded very soon so He does not get momma in trouble.

    I tried to do it this week but I can only get one of the two to come down in the sack and even that one might be a stretch to get the band around. I have read that if you band the sack the body heat will naturally sterilize the animal.

    Has anybody ever just banded the sack?

    I think they have grown to the top of the sack. a guy I work with said on cattle if you just cup the sack it will get warm and they will come down naturally but no luck when I tried it.

    HELP!!!

    Jon
     
  2. GR8PMKN

    GR8PMKN Well-Known Member

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    you need to get both...or the sack will just stretch..
     

  3. Ronney

    Ronney Well-Known Member

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    Hi Jon,
    Despite all the years I've spent working with sheep, the one thing I CANNOT
    do is get the ring on them with BOTH nuts where I want them to be :shrug: In my case I just don't seem to be able to grasp the knack of getting the elastrators off so I've given up and leave it for Kevin and I hold the lamb :)

    To your question. If you push both nuts back up into the body cavity and apply a ring to the bag you create a cryptorchid. The upside of this method is that the lamb retains many of the ram growth tendancies and is often used on lambs going to the works by the time they are 6 months old. The downside is that it doesn't guarantee infertility so if you are planning on hanging on to this chap there will be a risk that he could still be fertile - as I know to my cost.

    My situation was accidental. I had put a couple of culled ewes in with my hogget flock as they were too old to carry another lamb. Imagine my horror at finding both with twins. Closer inspection of the hoggets showed that two weathers were in fact cryptorchids and at least one of them had been fertile enough to do the deed. So persevere in getting the second one down or take him away from his mother when he is old enough to be weaned. Do you know anybody who can physically show you how to get the second one down - there is a knack to it and positioning of the back legs comes into it as well but I'm useless at trying to explain that sort of thing.

    Cheers,
    Ronnie
     
  4. MN Mom

    MN Mom Well-Known Member

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    That we are hoping to keep the lamb around as a companion to his mother. We don't want him to be a danger to our children or us. SO to me(Sara), it's most important that he not get the Ram like hormones or whatever, moreso than being infertile, if that makes any sense. Though of course both are important.

    Sara
     
  5. Ronney

    Ronney Well-Known Member

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    Hi Sara,
    My personal experience with cryptorchids has been all good. All on this farm are accidental and the fact that I don't realise I have crypts until I've got lambs on the ground indicates that they show very few ram tendancies other than somewhat better growth.

    We bought 25 acres in Taupo some 10 years ago and with it came a ewe and a weather as the woman selling wasn't able to take them with her. The weather had been her daughters pet lamb and was just the neatest animal - would follow you anywhere, hop in the car, and "help" with any outdoor chore that was going on. Came the first shearing, tipped him over and he's not a weather at all, he's a crypt. The downside to him was that the older he got the fatter he got and there was no way that I could keep the weight off him and in the end it was his undoing. He fell into the river in a place that he should have been able to get out but his weight plus the weight of water-logged wool prevented him from doing so. By the time I found him he was too chilled and he died two days later. The point of that rambling is that in my experience they are not the problem that rams can be but to be wary of the fact that they can become huge animals.

    Do you have the option of putting him in the freezer and buying in another ewe as company for the one you already have?

    Cheers,
    Ronnie
     
  6. KSALguy

    KSALguy Lost in the Wiregrass Supporter

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    how old is he? if you band them soon enough everything will fit nicely down inside the band and they are still young enough not to have much if any down time frim the shock of getting the circulation cut off down there,
    older animals you might as well just snip and clip,

    i would rather see them banded young though to save alot of hassle and pain
     
  7. Hawkfamily

    Hawkfamily Well-Known Member

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    What age is ideal if we are going to use the elastrator? We have a one-week old....can we do it as soon as the testicles fall? When should this happen?
    TIA!

    jodi

    Can someone confirm for me what a 'weather' is and what a 'crypt' is?
    Crypt is sterilizing by having pushed the testicles back up? and weather is castrating/removing the testicles completely?
     
  8. Ronney

    Ronney Well-Known Member

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    Jodi, you've got it in one :) but be aware that cryptorchiding does not necessarily render them sterile. It is not my preferred method as I can keep killers through to 2th. but most farms that practice that method here are looking at the lambs being off the farm by the time they are 6 months old.

    You can ring your little fellow any time you like from birth so long as you can find both testicles. Ideally, they should be done by the time they are 8 weeks of age.

    Cheers,
    Ronnie
     
  9. Philip

    Philip Philip

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    Jodi
    We aim to put rings on during the lambing season before the lamb is two weeks old. Usually we run them into the yards every second weekend, and every unbanded lamb gets done. It does mean that some might be almost a fortnight old while others might only be a few days, but its a compromise between the ideal lambs age (I prefer to do them between 1 and 2 weeks) and the other demands on our time around the block. I've never 'cryptoed' a lamb, but I did miss a calf last season, and we've ended up with a rig who is starting to display the bulls aggressive play. He's due to be processed as soon as it stops raining

    (Ronney, whats it like up north at the moment ? Our forage oats look like paddy rice at the moment, the place is so bloody wet down here - especially galling after the summer drought!)
     
  10. Ronney

    Ronney Well-Known Member

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    Hi Philip,
    I could say the same. After having got through the summer by the skin of our teeth, I'm now up to my armpits in mud - not that it's hard at my height :) However, apart from one short little cold snap, it has remained incredibly warm and the grass is still growing. But yes, a couple of good days would give some light relief from the mud. We're all clay pan where we are which is great in the summer but not so wonderful in the winter.

    You will have to refresh my memory I think because if I ever knew where you are, I have forgotten. Typical :p

    Cheers,
    Ronnie