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Discussion Starter #1
I'm going to try to post a pic for the first time, so don't laugh if if doesn't work! Here's the problem: The new gate is on the right. I'd dearly love to be able to use a latch like the one on the gate on the left, but there's just not enough clearance. There's maybe a inch or so. The hinge bolts can't go in any farther to make the gate go closer to the hinge post. I want a latch that can be done and undone with one hand, when the other is full, but still be resistant to smart horse lips bent on escape. I also can't cut into the post much because it has its hands full holding hinges to one gate and the latching to the one you see, and DH says it's been insulted enough. The perfect latch will not only be quick and convienient, but able to take cattle running in to its gate upon occasion. Any suggestions?
 

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Debbie-

I know the type of latch you have-- I just put one up today. That same company makes a "one way" latch, is that possible for the other gate? You could put another fence post in (or a 4 x 4, etc.) next to the existing one, and then make the gate stop at the post and only open one way.

Truth be told, I have the same problem as you do: I have one gate with the great 2-way hitch like you have, and the other that is too close to the post to put any sort of latch on. However, I only use the latched gate, for the most part. The other gate doesn't get used much, so it is just closed with a chain. One fact that I found out is that those heavy duty latches are great for saving wear and tear on your hinges-- the latch supports the gate on the other end.

Good luck!

T
 

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Would it be possible to use a chainsaw & slice some of the post off from the top, down so there would be enough room for the latch to fit?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Would it be possible to use a chainsaw & slice some of the post off from the top, down so there would be enough room for the latch to fit?

No, OD, afraid not. My hubby would never allow me to cut into such an important post!
 

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Our gates like this all ended up getting a loop of chain---like swing set chain------fastened to the gate between the top bar and the second bar.

The loop is not bolted to the gate but just moves loosely in that space----fasten the ends together with a screw link.

Make the chain loop big enough so it will just reach up and over the post.

Its not real purdy----but its an easy one hand operation.
 

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Two solutions:

1. Replace the existing too short chain that came with the gate for a longer one that will go around the post - hook into catch (be sure to turn chain flat after inserting in slot so it "catches"and horse can't undo). Awkward around a large post and sometimes hard to shut with one hand but can be done


2. Put a large eye bolt into the post with big enough eye for the chain to slide thru and then back to the catch.

Neither are quick but you can do them with one hand if need be. All metal gates in the corrals are shut this way here and they hold againt several hundred head of cattle banging around on them.
 

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Debbie in MO said:
I'm going to try to post a pic for the first time, so don't laugh if if doesn't work! Here's the problem: The new gate is on the right. I'd dearly love to be able to use a latch like the one on the gate on the left, but there's just not enough clearance. There's maybe a inch or so. The hinge bolts can't go in any farther to make the gate go closer to the hinge post. I want a latch that can be done and undone with one hand, when the other is full, but still be resistant to smart horse lips bent on escape. I also can't cut into the post much because it has its hands full holding hinges to one gate and the latching to the one you see, and DH says it's been insulted enough. The perfect latch will not only be quick and convienient, but able to take cattle running in to its gate upon occasion. Any suggestions?
I had some of these to Debbie, the easiest way is to make a notch with a chain saw. Just cut in at the top and bottom an inch or so horizontally then plunge cut with the tip of the bar to connect them. It really looks fine when it's done.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks TW, and everybody. The notching with the chainsaw is not allowed, my DH won't have it. Anyway, with the latch like the one I like on the opposing gate, the thingys that you pull up on to open the gate would be in a bind if you set that latch in. I think an arrangement with a chain (ugh) and eyelet like Barb mentioned might be my only choice when dealing with my husband's Holy Grail Post! ( I can't be to hard on him, he is a fantastic fence builder, always overbuilt! :)
 

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You never did say what the hinge side looks like. Is it possible to screw the hinges over to the right some more, or countersink them a bit on that post?

--->Paul
 

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Yes, in the first message, I see now.

How much room do you need? I'd guess 2 inches? It would not weaken either post to countersink the hinges an inch (already a hole in the post there anyhow), and make a groove an inch or less for the latch on this post (being rounded post, you are barely taking anything at all off). _Most_ hinges would allow for this, unless yours are rather weaker style, but those look like good gates, would have the good bolt-through longer hinges I'm guessing.

Since that's not allowed, then you'll need the chain.

--->Paul
 

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If you REALLY want the second gate to be identical to the other take the gate down and take it to a welder and have him to take a couple of inches out of the length. It sounds more difficult than it is! Visually all things will appear the same afterward. Personally, I would have the welder to make a metal mount for the latching portion of both gates as the shims you have behind gate one latch will not last.
 

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Debbie in MO said:
I'm going to try to post a pic for the first time, so don't laugh if if doesn't work! Here's the problem: The new gate is on the right. I'd dearly love to be able to use a latch like the one on the gate on the left, but there's just not enough clearance. There's maybe a inch or so. The hinge bolts can't go in any farther to make the gate go closer to the hinge post. I want a latch that can be done and undone with one hand, when the other is full, but still be resistant to smart horse lips bent on escape. I also can't cut into the post much because it has its hands full holding hinges to one gate and the latching to the one you see, and DH says it's been insulted enough. The perfect latch will not only be quick and convienient, but able to take cattle running in to its gate upon occasion. Any suggestions?
are your posts in concrete? other wise change the gate to hinge on the center post, that you have and move the other post the two inches and set in concrete or punched down gravel . that way you only have one post to move.

when setting your gates, it is better to hang them first, then put in the latch post, that way you should be right where you want to be. kate
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Yep, the posts are in concrete. Can't be moved. It's hard to put a post EXACTLY where you want it. I mean, it's not hard to get it in line along a fence line where you have a stringline, but it seems for the bigger holes you put concrete in, somehow they seem to shift right or left a few inches of your original intent by time you are through. Not a big deal for line posts, but it kinda messes up gate clearances! We had nothing but a good book and good intentions. Still have the best fence in the area! (Many of the locals snicker behind our backs at how we overbuild fences)
 

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Use a chain fastened to the rear of the post with a lag screw. Put a hook on the other end and go through the gate, hooking it to an eye bolt on the front side of the gate. Easy to open and the horses couldn't reach it from the field.
 

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Debbie in MO said:
Yep, the posts are in concrete. Can't be moved. It's hard to put a post EXACTLY where you want it. I mean, it's not hard to get it in line along a fence line where you have a stringline, but it seems for the bigger holes you put concrete in, somehow they seem to shift right or left a few inches of your original intent by time you are through. Not a big deal for line posts, but it kinda messes up gate clearances! We had nothing but a good book and good intentions. Still have the best fence in the area! (Many of the locals snicker behind our backs at how we overbuild fences)
had to laugh about your comment on how the locals snicker on your gates. having spent about 10 years in s. missouri , raising cattle on big farm.

i like those gates that fit and look like yours too, and that is what i strived for; but missouri, finally taught me that when you work alone and move cattle, they always swing closed at the wrong time. the locals with the sagging gates, work much better in the wind. you just lift them up and place them where you want them and the wind doesn't shift them at just the wrong moment. but i still like the look of a straight and true fence with properly hung gates. ps, be patient, it takes time to learn all the nitty gritty of getting stuff "jest right". :)
 

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What's all that green stuff on the ground behind the gates? We don't have any of that here :waa: I can see why you keep it locked up :haha:
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Lt. Wombat said:
What's all that green stuff on the ground behind the gates? We don't have any of that here :waa: I can see why you keep it locked up :haha:
Yes, we have plenty of green grass most of the season here in Missouri, but we don't have the vast pastures like you do to ride horses forever in, either! Everyplace has its trade-offs, don't they!
 

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Discussion Starter #20
kate said:
had to laugh about your comment on how the locals snicker on your gates. having spent about 10 years in s. missouri , raising cattle on big farm.

i like those gates that fit and look like yours too, and that is what i strived for; but missouri, finally taught me that when you work alone and move cattle, they always swing closed at the wrong time. the locals with the sagging gates, work much better in the wind. you just lift them up and place them where you want them and the wind doesn't shift them at just the wrong moment. but i still like the look of a straight and true fence with properly hung gates. ps, be patient, it takes time to learn all the nitty gritty of getting stuff "jest right". :)
I always just HATED having to struggle carrying a heavy gate through brush just to open it, especially when having a young horse in one hand and a water bucket in the other. I vowed my place would have none of that! We all have our little finickynesses!
 
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