Need Some HELP with Electrical fencing PLEASE!!

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by jamo, Apr 30, 2005.

  1. jamo

    jamo Well-Known Member

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    We have installed our first electric fence. Solar charger works fine but we aren't getting anything in the fence. Can someone help. Could it be that we didn't splice it right or maybe we didn't ground it properly. We ran the ground about 12 feet out and then another about 10 feet farther. I would reallpy appreciate any helpful comments.
    TIA, Jan
     
  2. moopups

    moopups In Remembrance

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    Put 'electric fence' into the search feature to view many of the passed discussions on this subject.
     

  3. Fire-Man

    Fire-Man Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Not sure about your set-up, But the ground should be hooked to a ground rod driven several feet into the dirt. Randy
     
  4. bill not in oh

    bill not in oh Well-Known Member

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    Jan
    What kind of posts/insulators/wire are you using?
    How many strands of wire at what heights?
    How do you know the charger is working?
    How long are the ground rods and what metal?
     
  5. Ole Man Legrand

    Ole Man Legrand Well-Known Member

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    Disconect the fence and put a fence test light across the hot of the box and the ground . That will tell you if the box is working.
     
  6. farminghandyman

    farminghandyman Well-Known Member Supporter

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    this is for the High tensile fence, but the basic construction applies, especialy to the insulators and the grounding,

    http://www.mytscstore.com/detail.asp?pcID=4&LearnID=11


    general info,
    http://www.foothill.net/~ringram/design.htm

    http://www.kencove.com/



    how it works and links
    http://www.motherearthnews.com/homesteading/2003_August_September/Electric_Fencing


    you need good ground rods, (two good copper or copper coated or a galvinized rod is uslay recomended and wire firmly attached to the rod), and the ground rod hooks to the bare terminal of the charger, and the hot terminal to the fence, the fence wire / wires, have to be insulated, if there is any thing shorting it out it will not work, and good insulators are need, if you used the tube insulators, a transistor radio carried around the fence may start to click on the speaker, (am) when you near a shorted area,

    the electric spark on a good fencer can jump up to 3/16 of and inch to a grounded rod, and if you have any metal touching the fence wire or a faulty insulator you my not have any charge on the fence,

    (when i go our an need to work on the fence in the field I usually carry a few steel posts and just stick the ends in the ground and lay them up on the fence a few yards away and ground out the fence and can work on it with our getting shocked)

    also if the ground is very dry they don't work well,


    hope this helps,
     
  7. Little Quacker in OR

    Little Quacker in OR Well-Known Member

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    :) Hi! This is something you probably already know but I had to learn it. And that is that nothing can touch the wire along it's length, like grasses and weeds. So, I use Round UP etc under the length of the fencing twice a year. ;)

    Hope you figure it out..it can be tricky. Once we got our solar charger working out though it worked really well.

    LQ
     
  8. agmantoo

    agmantoo agmantoo Supporter

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    Roundup will corrode galvanized metal such as electric or woven wire fence. Crossbow will eliminate unwanted broadleaf plants around fences without the corrosion
     
  9. Little Quacker in OR

    Little Quacker in OR Well-Known Member

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    :haha: you don't spray the fence you silly wabbit..you spray the weeds! LOL

    Seriously though, Round up does a good job on annual weeds and grasses here, Cross Bow is used on the perennials. I haven't had any problems with the field fencing by using the Round up but It's only been in use on this fence since '92 so I don't know about the long term effects.

    I am glad you noted this, I'll keep an eye on things and see what happens.

    LQ
     
  10. indypartridge

    indypartridge Well-Known Member Supporter

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    We have solar. The first one we had died prematurely, but the second seems to be working okay. Sometimes it gets kinda weak if we haven't had sunshine for several days. Once our horses learned a basic respect for the fence, I've even turned it off for a couple days so it could get a good recharging. After the first one died, I also go an inexpensive fencer (non-solar) that I can use if I have too...attached to several cords back to the barn.
     
  11. farminghandyman

    farminghandyman Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I have two of the things setting on a pallet and have not felt they were worth much, if you have 120 power use it.

    you have to have well trained animals and a perfect fence in my oppion to have the solar units be effective, (that was my experence and have not tryed again now for about 15 years).

    but a good 120 volt unit will charge many miles of fence, I buy the "20 mile fencers" and they uslay do a good job, even if dry, and the last few years we have been really dry, some time the sand is jsut to dry on top to work but if you have any mositure and good grounds you better cross carefully, LOL,
     
  12. rambler

    rambler Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Glysophate is very corosive to metals, and will eat the galvanizing off the wire over time. Once that is gone - and you won't notice it year to year until it's gone - the fence will rot out quickly. If you had a 50 year fence, you now might have a 25 year fence. Not sure that is of concern to you, but how it is. You will notice it 'someday'.

    The other problem is, you need to spray glysophate a couple times every year - it kills everything, & leaves a bare strip with no residual activity - weeds just are invided to grow right back.

    Something like Crossbow or other broadleaf herbicides will eventually kill off 95% of the broadleafs, and then you will have a nice grass growing under the wires. No need for fruther spraying after 3-5 years. Maybe minor touchup every few years.

    Seems like a better deal to me. Just something to think on.


    As to the original fencer question, how strong is the solar fencer; how long is the fence (total length of wire); how much sun did you get - did you let the battery charge up full for a couple days before using it on the wires? Don't believe the ratings on the box, if it says it is good for 1 mile of fence, that typically means the fencer is about worthless at one mile of fence - like vacumn cleaner & air compressor motor ratings, it is a 'stall' rating, not a 'useful' rating.......

    --->Paul
     
  13. twstanley

    twstanley Well-Known Member

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    If you have an electric fence you need one of the little neon fence testers with a probe to stick in the ground and a metal piece that lets you hang it on the fence. That way you can check the fence whenever you want without shocking the snot out of yourself.

    Troubleshooting fence problems is like troubleshooting most anything else, break it down to its smallest parts and test those, get those working then start adding pieces together and test.

    Build your fences so they can be disconnected into sections with switches or just wires you can disconnect.

    So test the charger first, if it works hook it to your first fence section, then test at the far end of that section, if it works hook up another section, test, rinse and repeat.

    We had a neighbor that swore the problem with the fence between our property and theirs was that all the tube insulators were bad on the two hot strands ( each strand 1/4 mile long ) so we spent a weekend taking it all down and putting new insulators back on and putting it back up.

    End result?

    The fence was still shorted. 10 minutes with a fence tester and we found that a few insulators on their front fence had failed shorting the whole system out, we replaced those with the easy snap on the tpost ones, and it all started working.

    So remember before you start fixing electric fence ( or most anything ), make sure you know where the problem is, don't just start guessing and fixing, you can waste a lot of time and money doing that.

    The time you spend troubleshooting to find what the REAL problem is will be made up in not wasting lots of time fixing stuff that isn't broken.