Need sandpaper education.

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Windy in Kansas, Sep 30, 2005.

  1. Windy in Kansas

    Windy in Kansas In Remembrance

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    I am in need of some sandpaper and need educated in order to purchase the correct kind.

    I will be sanding the interior of a 1949 Chevrolet truck cab prior to painting. Normally I would use a wet or dry sandpaper with a small amount of running water to do the sanding with.

    With these old cabs so prone to rust I'd rather not expose the interior to any water. So, what kind of sandpaper should I purchase to do the sanding with? I know from experience that the black colored wet or dry paper just tends to clog up too quickly to use it.

    Please, I'm open to opinions. Thanks!
     
  2. mrglock27

    mrglock27 Well-Known Member

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    I just bought a package of sandpaper at the dollar store It came with about 15 8.5 by 11 sheets. 3 assorted grits. It works well and it's for wood and metal.
     

  3. Ross

    Ross Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    I'd wet sand it with a 300 grit, I think the steel in those older trucks is higher quality than anything built in the 90's! I've used rust converter with some success, you only win that battle for so long anyhow!
     
  4. Ross

    Ross Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    Thinking a bit more if you really really don't want to use the water use a 200 grit emery and a filler primer.
     
  5. Windy in Kansas

    Windy in Kansas In Remembrance

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    Thanks!, I'm off to the hardware store. I already have some 80 grit emery paper, but it is far too coarse for my needed purpose.

    The real fun will be trying to get all of the sanding dust out and wiping down all of the interior prior to painting. With all of those curves and nooks and crannies it will be a challenge since I'll not be removing the gas tank to get behind it. I suppose that I should do the job correctly, but this is my daily driver, not a show truck. It won't be fun to paint inside of the enclosed space either. Thank goodness for an airbrush and touch-up gun.

    Thanks for the replies. Wish me luck.
     
  6. luckypabst

    luckypabst Active Member

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    You almost need to wet sand any surface that will be exposed to view after the painting is finished. Anything coarser than 400ish grit will show scratches through the top coat. Top coat may look nice as you're painting but paint does shrink as it dries and any flaws in the prep work will show through.

    If the current paint is fair, you only need to scuff it with a fine scotch-brite pad. If you're doing any heavy sanding, it'll need to be sanded with progressively finer paper until it's baby-butt smooth. Of course, any hidden surfaces won't need such meticulous finish work (behind the seat, under the headliner, etc.)

    Chris