Need 'rustic' kitchen countertop ideas

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Ann Mary, Aug 29, 2006.

  1. Ann Mary

    Ann Mary Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    1,315
    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2004
    Location:
    Idaho
    I have a very rustic kitchen with old homeade cabnents -which I LOVE! But the countertop needs help. Right now it is particleboard that was varnished but when we moved in we painted it white with an oil-based enamel that is nice and hard and has worked well...but...time to update a bit. Any ideas that dont' include laminate or tile??? (The countertop isn't perfectly square and things like that would really point that out) Has anyone used wood of some type or ??? Appreciate all the ideas! :)
     
  2. feral

    feral New Member

    Messages:
    2
    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2006
    I like butcher block and have made some small pieces out of rock maple for our older kitchen. It's probably cost prohibitive if you don't have access to a woodshop though.

    May also not be the best choice if you have a lot of surface to deal with.

    Good luck. :)
     

  3. FrankTheTank

    FrankTheTank Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    366
    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2003
    I've got a lot of counter space here, but although new within the past 8 yeas, the laminate we have could stand to be replaced too. I was reading about tiling...and thats where i would go. Sounds like your best bet is to put down 3/4 inch plywood and then tile over that...if i read that correctly....
     
  4. patnewmex

    patnewmex Jane of all trades

    Messages:
    1,794
    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2006
    Location:
    Sunny Northern New Mexico
    You can make your own out of concrete and wood forms. They will last a lifetime and you can finish them smooth, have different colors, incorporate rocks, shells, items you'd like. If you've ever seen concrete countertops, you might consider it. They are lovely.
     
  5. mpillow

    mpillow Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    9,569
    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2003
    Location:
    CHINA
    I like the tile idea and use the large ones...so you dont have so much grout work to do/clean...we have brown tile in the sunroom that looks like worn leather....
     
  6. PyroDon

    PyroDon Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,942
    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2006
    Location:
    S.E. Ks.
    You can make a nice rustic counter top
    If your on a buget use yellow pine. Buy some nice clear 2xs and rip them to an inch wide then glued the strips back together alternating the grain. use a small half round bit to knock off the sharp eadges . Then put it top down and drag it over some semi course gravel to distress the top. Give it a light sanding to remove any splinters. fishish with jell stain and poly or for a cutting board with a food safe oil.
     
  7. bill not in oh

    bill not in oh Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,869
    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2004
    Location:
    Earth
    Laminate with the right pattern won't accentuate the out-of-square[ness] of the counter.

    Could you build a pseudo-wall (a fascade over the out-of-square wall) to square it up? Or if it's not the wall that's out of square, replace the foundation of the counter top with one that is square. Then tile would work. Or, non-uniform (randomly shaped) tile might be an option.

    Decoupage antique magazine covers and/or catalog covers/pages. I can't recall what it is called, but someone makes an epoxy resin that is almost as hard as glass once it sets up that you could cover it with. You can pour this stuff almost as thick as you want (1/ 8 - 1/4 inch would be plenty) and would make a pretty durable surface.
     
  8. PyroDon

    PyroDon Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,942
    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2006
    Location:
    S.E. Ks.
    Ahh I should read closer :rolleyes:
    to install the counter top described above .
    put the top on , Do not fasten down
    run a ruler or devider along the wall with a pencil and mark the back of the counter top . cut this uneven line using a coping or jig saw and you should get a tight fit. Another ption is to make a template that matches the wall out of card board.
     
  9. BeckyW

    BeckyW Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    734
    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2003
    Location:
    Colorado
    If you have a Home Depot or Lowes near you, check out their end-of-summer sales. Ours has a gorgeous 12x12 Italian floor tile - very rustic looking - on sale for 88 cents sf. You can't beat that deal! For the edges, frame it out in 1x2 oak.
    New countertops for cents on the dollar.
    Autumn is for decorating in the home business, Unless you're in Florida or CA (I didn't look at where you are) climate zones, remodel construction slows considerably from now until after Christmas, thus clearance prices at places like HD.
    Good luck with your search.
    BW
     
  10. Mallow

    Mallow Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    361
    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2006
    Location:
    WV
    I will also put in a vote for poured concrete countertops. They are pretty amazing looking and stand up for a long long time.
     
  11. longshadowfarms

    longshadowfarms Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,528
    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2002
    Location:
    Alaska
    DH used some epoxy resin to cover a wood table top (can't remember why). We ended up using that as a counter top for now until we eventually redo the kitchen. It is wonderful stuff. I set hot pots on it, cut pizza on it and generally abuse it. The only think it didn't appreciate is where I attach my meat grinder, apple peeler or tomato sieve. It has some abuse marks showing there.
     
  12. RedTartan

    RedTartan Icelandic Sheep Supporter

    Messages:
    3,344
    Joined:
    May 2, 2006
    Location:
    Northeast Ohio
    Wow... I love the idea of a concrete countertop. That gets my vote! :)

    :) RedTartan
     
  13. longshadowfarms

    longshadowfarms Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,528
    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2002
    Location:
    Alaska
    You'd be hard pressed to notice the "out of square-ness" with tile that big.
     
  14. Dubai Vol

    Dubai Vol Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    414
    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2006
    Another vote for concrete. Tile sounds great until the grout starts to mildew, and it always does. Yuck.
     
  15. Sassafrassa

    Sassafrassa WorkerBee

    Messages:
    242
    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2006
    Location:
    North Carolina
    Concrete is beautiful, but it is pourous and will stain. It is also very heavy, so make sure your cabinets can handle the weight. It is gorgous, though, and will last a very long time. You can put anything on it without worrying about scorching. I have a friend who opted for concrete, and she loves it.

    Personally, we went for stainless steel. A bit more expensive than tile or laminate, but you can do it economically if you can find someone locally to do it. We had the local metal shop create the tops on top of wood tops created to fit our cabinets. The metal was glued down to the wood tops, and then installed. It has worked out great! Can't stain them, you can put anything on them, and they last forever.

    Good luck on your remodel. Be sure to share pictures when you are done!

    Sassa
     
  16. sue currin

    sue currin Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    555
    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2004
    Location:
    maine
    I just built a counter top yesterday, I used 3/4 plywood for the base then put 6" wide tongue and grove wood I got for 40 cents a board foot. Put on poly, will do that for 4 more layers. Looks great and you can cut it to fit the unsquareness. Cost me about 15$ for a 3x8 top. I used 1x4 pine for the splash board. Can hide alot with a good splash board.
     
  17. Ann Mary

    Ann Mary Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    1,315
    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2004
    Location:
    Idaho
    WoW! Thanks all for the ideas!!! Tile is great but I'm afraid that I would 'lose' too many dishes due to the teenage son putting them away.....and dropping them as he seems prone to do. :( I was wondering about the wood ideas and thanks SOOO much for those too. I was wondering how not have cracks for the food to get into but it seems if I glue it real well that should take care of it. The cement idea would be good too...but there again...not sure how many dishes I can afford yearly! :) I have pictures of the 'homeade' cabinents but I can't seem to be able to get them to post. Sorry! They are wood with the 'Z" on the front like a barn door -still natural wood color. Keep the great ideas coming and thanks everyone! :)
     
  18. mpillow

    mpillow Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    9,569
    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2003
    Location:
    CHINA
    A product called "Bar Top" I think...is used for wood covering...it is clear and kind of pricey but very durable
     
  19. donsgal

    donsgal Nohoa Homestead

    Messages:
    5,398
    Joined:
    May 2, 2005
    Location:
    SW Missouri near Branson (Cape Fair)
    I have always wanted to do a broken counter top (mosaic) covering. I saw this on television MANY, MANY years ago.

    Basically, you go to thrift stores and get plates with bad cracks or chips in them and break them into fair-sized pieces (3" - 4") or there abouts. Then you lay them higgly-piggly into a pattern of sorts and grout around them. You come up with a very interesting surface. On the television show it says to use blue and white plate patterns, but I cannot see breaking perfectly good plates for this purpose, so I modified it to be plates that are not that useable any longer.

    I think that when we build out house on the homestead (a zillion years from now) that might be an option - although I do perfer wood countertops, myself.

    Donsgal
     
  20. Deb862

    Deb862 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    594
    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2005
    Location:
    Upstate NY currently
    I actually just watched an whole show on how to pour/make your own concrete countertops (show was called "Rock Solid" or something). We really liked the idea throughout the whole show but then at the end the guy rubs on a "finish coat" of something I cannot remember to seal the concrete and proceeds to say this must be done very often to maintain a good sealed surface. We did not find that to be something we wanted to be tied to doing regularly.

    I love the wood idea, though, with the above-described sealant. You could probably make your own collage or something on top then seal it with the clear sealant that somone above spoke of. That would be definitely a very personal and individual end-product! :)