Need Opinions on Woodburning stove...

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by seedspreader, Jul 5, 2005.

  1. seedspreader

    seedspreader AFKA ZealYouthGuy

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    Yeah, I know it like 90+ degrees out, but I am looking for a used (ugh, can't afford the new ones) wood burning stove. I would like some suggestions about what you all are using, and what should be avoided, being used, I see a lot of those old "Ben Franklin" style woodstoves. Do the newer stoves really burn a lot more effieciently than the older airtights? At this point "glass" fronts aren't really that important, heat and avoiding using my fuel oil furnace are my biggest concern. I am sure some will chime it with their outside woodburners, but I just don't know too much about them, they seem cost inhibitive to me and somewhat wasteful. So opinions being what they are, please give me yours. I will not scorn ANY advice given but will weigh it all judiciously. I want to have it installed within the next two months. Thanks all.
     
  2. Cabin Fever

    Cabin Fever Life NRA Member since 1976 Supporter

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    Don't go near a "Ben Franklin" fireplace. These are NOT woodstoves...they are fireplaces. They waste fuel and actually draw warm air out of the house and up the chimney.

    Yes, the new air-tight wood burners are more are more efficient than the “old” air tights. All new woodstoves are required to have air pollution controls built into the stove. One benefit of the pollution requirements is that the new woodstoves are more efficient. There are two types of woodstove air pollution controls: catalytic combustion and secondary combustion. I prefer secondary combustion. It’s a simple and indestructible system that doesn’t break or plug. I have heard where owners of the catalytic-type of stove occasional have to replace the expensive ceramic catalysts due to breakage and occasional have to clean the catalysts due to plugging with soot.
     

  3. ozarksnick

    ozarksnick Don't Tread On Me!

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    I used one of these for a winter a while back and will probably be purchasing one of them again for this coming winter since I'm getting off propane.

    They are cheap. They work wonderfully. What more could you ask?

    We even cooked on it when our power was out for more than a week following a major ice storm that year.
     
  4. Ana Bluebird

    Ana Bluebird Well-Known Member Supporter

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    We've had several stoves---got one of those franklins in the garage now, but I don't like it. You have to cut the wood way too small, it isn't efficient at all, and doesn't seem to heat very well even though it has a blower on it. My in-laws gave it to us. But we did have an old pot-bellied stove once that we were very please with. It held heat really well, you loaded it from the top and could put in long pieces of wood, and it fed itself since it was top-loaded. It would hold a fire all night. We cooked on it, too. Unfortunately we sold it with the house. Have never had a new stove.
     
  5. cookiecache

    cookiecache Well-Known Member

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    Used stoves can be a great deal if they are in good condition. Do NOT use old stove pipe. The insulated stove pipe must be new, and could cost more (around thirty dollars a foot here in Alaska) than a used stove. I'm not sure why it fails, but I know a couple of homesteaders that have lost their cabins to used pipe.
     
  6. BamaSuzy

    BamaSuzy Well-Known Member

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    We have an Ashley wood-burning heater and it heats our whole house! We previously had an Ashley and used it for about ten years before selling it in our previous house. We bought this one new about four years ago and it cost about $450 but it's been worth every penny in savings!

    If you buy a wood heater it would be great if you could fire it up and make sure there is no smoke seeping out of any unseen cracks.....
     
  7. ellebeaux

    ellebeaux Well-Known Member

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    I'd look in the want ads - I've found two for $75 each down here.
     
  8. Alex

    Alex Well-Known Member

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    We love our new, last winter, Blaze King catalytic wood stove.

    Previous post of what it looks like, Zeal you probably saw this (?), because it was in response about your previous question about cost,

    And, we had an Ashley which we bought used for $15 at a local corner store, 33 years ago, used it for many years -- we could fill it with almost as much wood as we can put in our new Blaze King, and with its spring-loaded-automatic damper would burn all night -- Great stove.

    Ours looked just like this picture, from the manufacture,

    [​IMG]

    Scout around and find something,

    Alex
     
  9. seedspreader

    seedspreader AFKA ZealYouthGuy

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    Thanks for the info on the Ashley... will keep my eyes open. Yeah Alex, your stove is beautiful, but WAY too expensive for me at this point. I know, I know, the savings will make the payments, I just don't have the dough right now. Basically if something (cars, hot water heaters, etc.) can break around here, it has.

    Keep the info coming. I will stay away from the "ben Franklin" types.