Need ideas generaating income

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by jackie c, Aug 12, 2004.

  1. jackie c

    jackie c Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    561
    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2004
    Location:
    ontario
    I love living in the country. I've been out here for 8 years. I had a good job in the city that allowed me to live comfortably, but have been "downsized" I now have a low paying job that barely pays the bills.
    Little by little I'm becoming more self sufficient, I raise chickens for meat and eggs, and turkeys and pigs for meat/sale, and of course a garden.
    I'm trying to come up with other sources of income that will at least allow me to cut the time I have to spend in the city working, down to a minimum. I am considering worm farming. I live in an area where there are a lot of fishermen, and I know I could sell them a ton of worms. Does any one have any info or experience on this subject?
    I also would like to know if anyone is a CSA farm and how to go about getting customers or to set up a CSA in my community
    Does anyone have any ideas on other sources of income that I could generate on my little farm? I have 160 acres but not alot of pasture or workable land, only about five acres.
    I work hard and am fit and able but I really hate shedding blood, sweat and tears for someones else's bank account.
    I could sure use some help getting out of the city, once and for all!
     
  2. steff bugielski

    steff bugielski Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,830
    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2003
    Location:
    NY
    How about some animals to take to birthday parties in the city.
    how about renting out a room for a summer weekend, like a bed and breakfast on a farm complete with chores.
    How about a writers retreat or artist retreat away from all ditractions.
    thats all I got
    Steff
     

  3. pinemead

    pinemead Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    851
    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2003
    Location:
    Eastern Shore, Maryland
    Jackie, our situations are a lot alike. I'm not quite as far along as you are though. I have 6 ac including the house and work a full time job and a part time job (one or the other 7 days a week). There's also a 3 hour a day commute to the full time job. Not much time left for the farm. I'm selling herbs at the farmer's market for the first time this year, but am far from breaking even. I'd really like to keep my part time job and add another day, but I've really got to get out of my full time work. I hate it and it is having a real negative effect on my health. If you have a farmer's market in a city near you that you can get into you should check it out. You can make good money if you find your niche. Please post any ideas that you come up with. At my market, the things that sell best are of course produce, eggs, butchered chickens, cut flowers, and baked goods.
     
  4. Terri

    Terri Singletree & Weight Loss & Permaculture Moderator Staff Member Supporter

    Messages:
    14,841
    Joined:
    May 10, 2002
    Location:
    Kansas
    Try honey bees. Honey right now sells retail for $3 to $5 a pound. I don't know what the yield is in ontario, but in Kansas each hive averages about 60 pounds more honey than the hives need.

    Modern honeybees are very gentle, and rarely sting if you give them some smoke before you open the hive.

    Each hive only takes up about 5' by 5' of space, and will make your garden yield better.

    Just don't put the hive in where livestock can get to it. I have heard stories of a large animal deciding to scratch its' itchy side against a hive and tipping it over, to the distress of both the bees and the critter, who gets stung. :eek: :(
     
  5. Jen H

    Jen H Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,832
    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2004
    Location:
    Washington
    You could raise fiber goats. Angora and cashmere goats don't need much cleared pasture. In fact, they prefer brush (just make sure there aren't any burrs for the angoras to get into). As a plus, mohair and cashmere go for a very good price on the fiber market. You can also milk the fiber breeds, they just don't give as much milk as the dairy goats do.
     
  6. Sue C

    Sue C Member

    Messages:
    19
    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2004
    Location:
    Ontario
    Which City are you close to? If you are in the south you have a long summer & milder winters than Sudbury, Thunderbay. Worms would be great, there are biodynamic farms in the south end and they do buy lots of worms at times. Nothing better for your garden that good worm castings.
     
  7. Shrek

    Shrek Singletree Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    11,223
    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2002
    Location:
    North Alabama
    Bait worms, worm compost, small scale day trading , catalog sales from SMC at holidays, vegetable sales at farmers markets and the occasional flea market circuit are all good sources of additional income.
     
  8. Hank - Narita

    Hank - Narita Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    960
    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2002
    Pinemead, what herbs are you selling? How do you package them? Do you sell them fresh or dried? We are trying the farmers market this Saturday. We only have a little thyme, some basil, sage, rosemary and lavender to sell.
     
  9. chickflick

    chickflick Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    575
    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2003
    Location:
    Texas
    I have needed to be a homeschooling mom for years (well. WAS) and I FINALLY hit upon Jack Russell Terriers... well dogs, anyway... The business started out as a pet.. then a girl.. then kept a pup or two..got another female, and so on.

    I now am raising and selling Pekingese AND... By the way all.. I've got my first two litters now!!! (Guess I got lonely without a bunch of puppies around from time to time, so had to start again w/new breed)

    If you think of raising dogs.. be SURE you get good stock. ANYONE can be a creep and make dogs make puppies!!! They deserve the VERY BEST of your care, time and attention and they DARN SURE deserve AKC recognition and not those 'flake-tard' other registeries. (that remark does not apply to JRTCA, thank you.. who are actually BETTER at what THEY do 'registration wise" than AKC.. BUT.. )

    I'm just saying if you do this DO IT RIGHT... KNOW your Breed, Know your perspective purchasers/pet parents. Don't even let em come LOOK til you give em a REAL GOOD Grillin' over the phone!! NO one should ever be THAT desperate to sell a puppy IF you did it RIGHT. :yeeha:

    Uh.. anyway.. I'll shut up.. got carried away again... PM me if this is something that interests you.
     
  10. Hank - Narita

    Hank - Narita Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    960
    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2002
    We are going to start raising Australian shepherds. Our email is hsnrs@vtc.net if you have some helpful hints. Our first female will be AKC/ASCA. We can't wait for those cute wiggle butts.
     
  11. Ken Scharabok

    Ken Scharabok In Remembrance

    Messages:
    6,844
    Joined:
    May 11, 2002
    Send an e-mail to scharabo@aol.com and ask for a free e-Book copy of "How to Earn Extra Money in the Country." However, it is too large of an attachment for at least hotmail.com and webtbv.net to handle.

    Ken Scharabok
     
  12. pinemead

    pinemead Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    851
    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2003
    Location:
    Eastern Shore, Maryland
    Hank - Narita, the market I do is in a pretty "yuppie" town so I can get pretty good prices. I sell mostly cullinary herbs - basil, thyme, sage, parsley, rosemary, etc. I pot them in decorative pots to sell singles at $4.50 ea, but what sells the best is the dish gardens. I blend 5 or 6 herbs in a large terra cotta bowl. They sell well at $26. I also sell window boxes with 3 herbs. I didn't sell any bedding plants this year, but will next year. I'm also selling dried everything. Good luck at the market.
     
  13. scottdoyle

    scottdoyle Active Member

    Messages:
    36
    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2004
    Location:
    Ontario
    Not sure what part of Ontario you live in but I live near Woodstock where there is a farmers auction every Friday. This is not a big money maker for me but I take young pigs their from my farm and sell them. I use the money made that night to buy fruits and vegitables, chicks and ducklings, tools, clothing... you name it. This obviously isn't a job, which is what you are asking about, but I thought it was worth mentioning as maybe a way to cut some of your living costs.You could buy many things you need by taking something that you may already be producing to a farmers auction. Just a thought?
     
  14. Hank - Narita

    Hank - Narita Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    960
    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2002
    Thanks for the info on the herbs. We will probably pot up herbs and vegetable starts next year to sell. We aren't going to the farmers market tomorrow; rain washed over our road and can't get out for awhile unless it is gone by the morning.
     
  15. jackie c

    jackie c Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    561
    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2004
    Location:
    ontario
    Thanks for all the great ideas! There is a farmers market here and I was going to try it out but it was an awful spring and cold summer this year so not to much surplus...definately none to sell. I am considering purchasing a breeding pair of Giant Alaskan Malamutes. I love the breed and they are very hardy for our cold winters in the Thunder Bay area. I am going to try selling herbs in pots, sounds like something that might fly around this area. I'm not sure about the artist retreat though, but a type of farm work retreat sounds interesting. Goats really need constant surpevision which I presently am not able to provide, maybe in the future. Anyway you all have given me alot of ideas to consider and am very grateful for the input. Thanks again.
     
  16. "Mmmm! You said there are a lot of fishermen in the area? Could also mean there are a lot of campers also? Have you thought about running a mobile bait stand? Every evening or morning drive through the camp grounds and sell bait and tackle. Baits such as farm raised worms, chicken liver and/or rabbit liver, live minnows, homemade dough balls. Plus fire wood for the campers.

    Also you say you have a lot of land but very little cleared off. I've been raising goats for 3 summers now and have found mine need very little supervision. What I have been doing is buy young weening age goats in the early spring. Place them behing electric fence and just let them eat all the brush they want. Then come fall I sell them off and usually for a bigger profit. I check on them about once a day unless I'm busy then it might be another day or two and I check the fence out almost daily to see if it is still hot and working. I do this with the gate hook. I remove it and barely touch it to the ground rod nearby and see if I get any sparks. I weed eat the grass under the fence about every two weeks or so.

    When I cash my goats in this fall I'm planning on using the money to buy us a side of beef. With a bigger goat operation a person might could buy all there food supply for the whole year. Depending on the families need.

    Also I'm not out any money on goat feed since they do a very good job of finding brush to eat.
     
  17. tinknal

    tinknal Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    17,240
    Joined:
    May 21, 2004
    Location:
    Minnesota
    Two things I have found are a seasonal gold mine. Chimney cleaning, and venison processing. Both are fairly cheap to get into, and give big returns, the downside, is that both are very seasonal.
     
  18. pointer_hunter

    pointer_hunter Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    381
    Joined:
    May 8, 2004
    Location:
    Michigan
    Do you need a license to process the venison? We have been doing our own for years and are pretty good and quick about it. It would be nice to be able to make some quick cash doing others, but I would think a permit or something would be needed.
     
  19. tinknal

    tinknal Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    17,240
    Joined:
    May 21, 2004
    Location:
    Minnesota
    PH, you would have to check MI laws, but in MN, as long as you you only cut, grind, and wrap, you don't need a license. If you smoke, dry, or further process, you need a license. many processors here send their sausage to a licensed processor to provide that service to thoer customers.