Need ideas for powering DirecWay (Satellite Internet) ONLY (Approx. 30 Watts/hour)

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by mommykood, Jan 12, 2005.

  1. mommykood

    mommykood Active Member

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    Hello, everyone! :) Thanks for all the advice thus far. :)

    I have another question for you all. We have decided to nix the entire "homestead" worth of solar power. We only need to find a power system for our DirecWay DW6000 (satellite internet), which draws 30 watts/hour on average, with 100 watts maximum (according to the specifications).

    Any ideas?

    Thanks! :)

    Jen :)
     
  2. seedspreader

    seedspreader AFKA ZealYouthGuy

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    If your lucky maybe backwoodsidaho will respond. He lives off-grid and uses satellite.
     

  3. mightybooboo

    mightybooboo Well-Known Member

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    You have a choice,solar,water or wind.Other than that a generator.Whats your choice?

    BooBoo
     
  4. mightybooboo

    mightybooboo Well-Known Member

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    This setup would do you nicely I think.Pretty little system,very slick.If you have wind you just may run some lights and other things too.Throw in a Honda eu-1000 or eu-2000 pure sine wave genny,you have a nice,expandable system.Check out his amp/hr archives,pretty good!
    BoooBoo

    www.evinger.com/personal/solar.htm
     
  5. mightybooboo

    mightybooboo Well-Known Member

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    Could somebody explain to mommy about amp/hrs,instead of watt/hrs?
    Its usually measured amp/hrs given out in system power ratings so an understanding of amp/hrs and calculating such would be more useful than watt/hrs when you want to compare systems.
    Im not good at explaining it. :no:

    BooBoo
     
  6. boren

    boren Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Indiana
    Basically:

    Watts == Volts * Amps.

    Amps = Watts/Volts.

    You can do most of the math. There's a hickup though. AC power isn't used perfectly. There's something called power factor, most people ignore it. I won't go into the details, but on electronics you should probably use:

    Watts = 0.75 * Volts * Amps.
    Amps = Watts/(0.75*Volts)

    You can probably debate the value for power factor correction, but I think 0.75 should be safe.

    Are you sure living off grid is going to save you money? You want to power your internet, run a fridge, run a gas stove, and heat the house with gas somehow. The gas heating in WI is going to be terribly inefficient since you can't blow the hot air around the house and away from the heater.

    For some reason I didn't think WI allowed shallow wells. How do you plan to keep the well from freezing and pumping water?
     
  7. mommykood

    mommykood Active Member

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    <<Are you sure living off grid is going to save you money? You want to power your internet, run a fridge, run a gas stove, and heat the house with gas somehow. The gas heating in WI is going to be terribly inefficient since you can't blow the hot air around the house and away from the heater. >>

    Living off-grid isn't about "saving money" for us. It is about living off-grid, out from the thumb of someone else.

    We have listened to all the advice and information that this forum has brought us on refrigeration, and we have decided to either use a "5 day" cooler or a small, used RV refrigerator.

    We have decided to use either a Pioneer Maid or Kitchen Queen for combination wood heat/cook stove. No gas there. :)

    <<For some reason I didn't think WI allowed shallow wells. How do you plan to keep the well from freezing and pumping water?>>

    We have no well, we will be bringing in water. :)

    <<This setup would do you nicely I think.Pretty little system,very slick.If you have wind you just may run some lights and other things too.Throw in a Honda eu-1000 or eu-2000 pure sine wave genny,you have a nice,expandable system.Check out his amp/hr archives,pretty good!
    www.evinger.com/personal/solar.htm >>

    Thanks for the information! :) We will look at the link and see if it is do-able! :)

    Thanks again, everyone, for all the information thus far! :)

    Jen
     
  8. WisJim

    WisJim Well-Known Member Supporter

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    [QUOTE=mommykood
    We have no well, we will be bringing in water. :)

    It is worth considering some way of collecting rainwater. You could get a lot more water than you might expect just collecting and storing the runoff from your roof. Old bulk tanks from dairy farms are good storage tanks, and can sometimes be found cheap. They may hold 200 to 1000 gallons, 500 is pretty common.
    Some friends found a wrecked milk haling truck at the salvage yard, bought the stainless steel tank from it, hired a back hoe to dig a hole for it, and have thousands of gallons storage buried in the yard. It fills from their roof through downspouts through a filter to a smaller tank and then to the buried tank, and is pumped from the buried tank to the house by a small 12 volt pump.
    They collect water from their shed for their animals and garden.

    Jim
     
  9. mommykood

    mommykood Active Member

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    We are planning on collecting our rain water, but we were thinking of using simple 55 gallon food-grade drums (with spigots, if possible). We could then filter the water and use it in our household. Where we are located, since we have no septic system (we have a privy/composting toilet permit), we can not have any type of well on the property...

    Thanks for the ideas about the old bulk tanks from dairy farms or from a dairy truck. We could add something like that in the near future - right now, we just need to "finish" building the homestead cabin and move in! :) That sounds like a good project, though, for the summer or fall...

    Thanks again for all the advice you have given me! :)

    Jen :)
     
  10. boren

    boren Well-Known Member

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    I'm not trying to be discouraging, just providing ideas to think about.

    Collecting rain water is great, hopefully you have enough rainfall. I would worry about algea and bacterial growth in your tanks. I guess filters can remove most of this, but that means you have to buy expensive filters... The tanks will have to be buried to avoid freezing solid in the winter. I guess you can try and work alternate water sources in the winter...?

    But doesn't bringing in water put you under the thumb of who ever is supplying the water? Same with the filters...?