need help with mint

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by posifour11, Apr 28, 2006.

  1. posifour11

    posifour11 Well-Known Member

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    i have tried starting mint 3 different times and always the same result, dead in 5 days. the soil where i am planting it is very sandy, could that be it?

    the wife says i have a green thumb, but i'm atarting to think its gangreen, any help?? :shrug:
     
  2. susieM

    susieM Well-Known Member

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    Mint? That stuff grows like crazy, gotta put a bottomless bucket down, so the roots don't escape and take over.

    Could be the sand, though. Or maybe too much sun. Try putting it in a shady place, under some manure, and water in well. Or take a clipping and root it in a glass of water, first. It does well in damp places.
     

  3. BrahmaMama

    BrahmaMama Well-Known Member

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    Hmmm... At work (I'm a gardener) there is nothing but sand there, and the mint grows very well.
    We do use mushroom compost to top dress every year though.
    Have you tried any kind of compost?
    What about started plants? Maybe it's just a matter of getting a good root system started. :shrug:
    Good luck! :)
     
  4. Meg Z

    Meg Z winding down

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    I've been trying to grow mint for over 20 years, and haven't been able to...pot, ground, dry, wet, sun, shade...you name it! On the other hand, I have no problem growing orchids, even from seed on agar, so part of my thumb is still green!

    Meg
     
  5. vegascowgirl

    vegascowgirl Try Me

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    Is there a possability that cats have been useing the area for a potty? could be too much amonia in the soil from their urin. I grow mint in large pots/buckets to keep them from taking over the other plants...as well as to keep the critters out.
     
  6. susieM

    susieM Well-Known Member

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    Try growing it indoors.
     
  7. Marcia in MT

    Marcia in MT Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Could there be a lack of humidity? Cuttings need some extra humidity to make up for the initial lack of roots. We put a plastic tent over our cuttings (in soil, and treated with a rooting hormone) and generally get 100% take.
     
  8. susieM

    susieM Well-Known Member

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    Stick a sprig into a glass of water, it should send out roots.
     
  9. Kazahleenah

    Kazahleenah Disgruntled citizen

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    When I saw the subject title, I was SURE that you needed help getting RID of mint! lol. I planted it ONCE at the farm, then spent years trying to contain it to one area and keep it from infesting the entire farm!! I have no idea why it won't grow where you are at, that's a problem I never had. :shrug:

    Kaza
     
  10. culpeper

    culpeper Well-Known Member

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    Can't understand it at all. I put mint anywhere, and it soon threatens to overtake everything!

    Your sandy soil won't be helping, as mint needs a soil which is evenly and constantly moist. This is where most people go wrong - either they allow the soil to dry out in between waterings, or else they drown the plants! Amend your soil with some compost well before planting. I always suggest that people grow mint in large containers, because once it takes off it can quickly become a nuisance.

    When starting any cutting, you need to baby it for a while. Don't put it in full sun, keep it protected with wind etc. I find that mint prefers a partially-shaded position, and it will do better in a warm climate.

    When gardeners talk about 'ideal temperatures' for plants or seeds, they're not talking about the air temp. They're talking about the SOIL temp. It can make all the difference in the world!

    Get some commercial potting mix, plant your cuttings in a pot, keep the soil constantly moist (not soggy), put a clear plastic cloche (tent) over the pot and plant, ensuring that the plastic cannot touch the leaves, and sit back and watch them take off. Remove the cloche once the plants are well underway.

    A good tip for watering: Do the Finger Test. Poke your forefinger straight down into the soil or potting mix. If the tip of your finger can feel the moisture, there's no need to add water. If it's dry, add water.
     
  11. Pony

    Pony Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Try growing it where you don't want it. Almost guaranteed to take off!

    Pony!