Need Help Quickly!!!!

Discussion in 'Goats' started by moosemaniac, Sep 18, 2006.

  1. moosemaniac

    moosemaniac Well-Known Member

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    A friend in my goat club just called. A boer doe she didn't know was pregnant just kidded. One baby is dead and the other isn't looking great, but so far so good. Mama is looking very bad. She asked me to take the buck kid (quite good registerable blood lines) off her hands for free and bottle feed him as she doesn't think the mother can handle it at all, in fact she may not survive.

    I need info fast. Colostrum replacement recipe and any other tips. So far she has gotten some nutridrench into the kid. I'm picking him up on my way home in about 2 hours.

    Ruth
     
  2. Patty0315

    Patty0315 Well-Known Member

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    Call around and see if you can find the real stuff. Cow will work if you have nothing else. I think they make a powered replacer check your feed stores.

    Patty
     

  3. moosemaniac

    moosemaniac Well-Known Member

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    I can't find any, Patty. That's why I'm looking for recipes. Feed store is way out of the way to get quickly. I have two milking goats, but no colostrum.

    Ruth
     
  4. valhalladad

    valhalladad Active Member

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    Colostrum is mainly antibodies. At least that is what the kids need from colostrum. I would just keep it isolated to protect it from any kind of infection and give it goat milk. The biggest fear I would have is tetnus and CAE. I have never heard anything good about replacers. I did try goat milk replacer a couple of times. Never again for us. I would just watch it very close and raise it on a bottle. I prefer pasteurized milk for kids mainly for CAE, but in this case it might be wise because of the lack of antibodies. I would also use antibiotics as a last resort, but would have something handy. I want to wish a lot of luck. I used to keep colostrum in the freezer was animals in distress, but it was just taking up space and haven't had any goats for a couple of years. Over the years it was used on the whole spectrum of different critters from cats and dogs to horses and llamas. One vet I used left the area and the other stopped doing large animals so the demand was no longer there. I might suggest putting a little aside. I always heat treated it and froze my extra. It should be from the first couple of days as the antibody content drops fast. I can't be allowed to heat over 137 F. or the antibodies are killed. It is a pain but at times like this you well find it worthwhile. Sorry I couldn't be more help.
     
  5. moosemaniac

    moosemaniac Well-Known Member

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    Located some colostrum replacer at TSC. DH will pick that up while I pick up the kid. Any other ideas or tips would be greatly appreciated.

    Ruth
     
  6. AnnaS

    AnnaS Well-Known Member

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    Milk out the mama. Even if all you get is a couple of spoonfuls, it will be much better than the replacer.
     
  7. goatkid

    goatkid Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I second that about milking out the mama. Then, give the colostrum replacer the first day. After that, I'd feed the kid pasteurized goat milk.
     
  8. Patty0315

    Patty0315 Well-Known Member

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    One reply might have sounded a bit off to some. So to make it clear to everyone who may be new. CAE is not caught by not haveing colustrum but by having infected coulstrum or by coming in contact with boody fluids of an infected animal.

    We heat treat the colustrum and milk to prevent transmitting it to the babies. Best yet have your does tested.

    I would still be carefull with the replacer. It is the antibodies the baby needs and nothing is a good as Mama. They are born with 0 protection. Keep baby dry and draft free. Most of all keep the pen clean.

    Give shots , worm and use cocci meds. Feed lots of small meals .After the replacer I would go to goat milk or whole cow milk none of the powered crap. And at kidding season save some colustrum.

    Good luck.

    Patty
     
  9. topside1

    topside1 Retired Coastie Supporter

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    Someone in you goat club must have frozen colostrum stowed in their barn freezer. I would seriously ask around, but even simpler milk the doe and feed....Tennessee John
     
  10. moosemaniac

    moosemaniac Well-Known Member

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    I ended up with both Doe & Kid. Kid only weighs 2 pounds. Mama is too weak to nurse, and her udder just isn't much at all. Baby is doing quite well though, taking a bottle on demand about every 5 hours. I'm using the Manna Plus Colostrum. Mama eating hay and a mix of goat feed and calf manna. Son watching Mama for me, and I brought baby to work. My bosses are both pretty understanding about these things.

    Ruth
     
  11. Aintlifegrand

    Aintlifegrand Well-Known Member

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    Good luck with the two. You sound like you have it under control. I can't imagine the look I'd get here not from bosses from my employees if I brought a goat baby..lol..these people are straint up exec type all about mid twenties and I can bet none have ever even seen a goat.
     
  12. moosemaniac

    moosemaniac Well-Known Member

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    LOL, a client came in a bit ago. I let him take a peek at "Rocky". The fella says..."that's a cow!". I really had to laugh. The poor little guy only weighs 2 pounds. Imagine a premie cow at 2 pounds...I can't.

    Ruth
     
  13. Idahoe

    Idahoe Menagerie More~on

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    Good luck to your little fellow! Two pounds, good grief. I don't think I COULD work, I might show up, but . . .

    BTW, do you know yet what is going on with the doe?
     
  14. moosemaniac

    moosemaniac Well-Known Member

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    The little guy sleeps a lot, so work isn't a problem. I don't know what's going on with the doe, but I have a suspicion. I'm working on the situation right now.

    Ruth
     
  15. moosemaniac

    moosemaniac Well-Known Member

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    Mom is doing quite well!

    Little Moose weighed in this morning on my digital soap scale at 4 pounds 2 ounces. He's been bouncing around a bit too for the first time.

    Ruth
     
  16. Caprice Acres

    Caprice Acres AKA "mygoat" Staff Member Supporter

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    Sounds alot like my doeling when she was born. She couldn't even hold her head up.
    order the goat colostrum by kaeco from jeffers. I used this and I LOVE it. Also, don't use milk replacer, use this formula mix:

    Milk Replacer

    Recipe : 1 gallon of whole cow’s milk from the grocery store (I used vitamin D milk), 1 can of evaporated milk, 1-cup buttermilk. (Not the low fat kind, if possible).
    Pour off 4 cups of whole milk. Add buttermilk and the whole can of evaporated milk. Add back as much whole milk as will fit, shake, pour in bottle and serve warm...

    To warm milk put it in the microwave, but make sure the heat is distributed evenly, just like with a human infant. Shake well!