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I am presuming you are talking about varieties of iris that grow from rhizomes not bulbs. If so simply dig them up. Cut off any diseased looking areas. Each transplant should have the area where last years leaves grew from left intact plus at least a couple more inches if not more. Won't hurt any to let the cut area dry over. Trim back the green leaves on top till they are 3-4 " long and then replant with the rhizomes showing above the soil not completely buried. To move some in the spring follow the same procedure as early as possible in the year or pot them up this fall and move them pot an all in the spring.

Good luck,

PQ
 

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Discussion Starter #3
PonderosaQ said:
I am presuming you are talking about varieties of iris that grow from rhizomes not bulbs. If so simply dig them up. Cut off any diseased looking areas. Each transplant should have the area where last years leaves grew from left intact plus at least a couple more inches if not more. Won't hurt any to let the cut area dry over. Trim back the green leaves on top till they are 3-4 " long and then replant with the rhizomes showing above the soil not completely buried. To move some in the spring follow the same procedure as early as possible in the year or pot them up this fall and move them pot an all in the spring.

Good luck,

PQ
Mrs says she thinks they are rhizomes and said,Hmmm...I think i could do
that!This is making more sense to her than me,fortunately 1 of us gets it.
So how do you divide them,just cut them as you said,then you plant the sections with the leave parts,and plant the parts you cut off(will they have leafy areas too?)Or do you toss the cut off section away?
Thank you PQ,really appreciated!
BooBoo
 

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Sorry if I worded it in such a way you didn't understand. Yes you cut off the part with the leaves from what looks kind of like a sick long potato that is in the ground. You will usually find some pieces with holes in them from bugs or soft spots. You throw them away. Try and leave something the size of a small potato attached to the leaf bit. Cut the leaves down till they are only 3-4" long. Put the new plant back in the ground so the potato like tuber is only 1/2 covered.

I hope this makes it clear for you. If you still have questions, please pm me or reply here. I love plants and think it's neat you want to learn about them too.

pQ
 

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Iris are very, very hardy, at least in my experience.

I've had some 30-40 I've been carting around for several years now which I only got planted just a couple of weeks ago. !

I have literally been keeping them in large cooking pots, then out on their own with no covering, and they've grown anyway. I didn't have a chance to build a bed for them til a few weeks ago, and in they went as quickly as possible. I covered them with straw, leaving the green sticking out, and they're doing fine.

With a minimal amount of care, your wife's iris should be jusr fine. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #6
countrygrrrl said:
Iris are very, very hardy, at least in my experience.

I've had some 30-40 I've been carting around for several years now which I only got planted just a couple of weeks ago. !

I have literally been keeping them in large cooking pots, then out on their own with no covering, and they've grown anyway. I didn't have a chance to build a bed for them til a few weeks ago, and in they went as quickly as possible. I covered them with straw, leaving the green sticking out, and they're doing fine.

With a minimal amount of care, your wife's iris should be jusr fine. :)

Thank you all so much! :worship:
BooBoo
 
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