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Discussion Starter #1
HI I have 2 boys who would like ot learn more about wood working. I put them in some 4H camps and they each made a bird house. they both got blue ribbons for their bird houses. So my question is since they have both built a bird house what should they build next? I wondered about a different stlye of bird house?????

Also one of my sons would like to make something that looks like an arial view of a farm. I don't know what it is called but it looks like it is made with a sheet of plywood and then built on. Any idea what it is called?

I've been looking at power tools and I think I am going to go with a set of black and decker skill saw, jig saw, drill, belt sander. I am hoping inexpensive = lightweight.

Is there anything I should get for saftey. Maybe goggles?

Does anyone have any good links I can get idea for the boys' next project?

How hard is a picnic table? I want one so bad but they always seem like so much money compared to what you get. any one know where there are free pattern available?

Thanks
Caren
 

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A pic nic table isn't rocket science. However I would suggest they start out making themselves old fashioned capenters tool boxes, followed by a workbench. In the begining the best projects are ones you make for yourself.

Here's a link to a site with free plans.

http://absolutelyfreeplans.com/OUTDOOR PROJECTS/outdoor_projects.htm

Also you might want to consider hand powered tools in the begining. For one thing precise work is easier to achieve with hand powered tools. Also I've never had a old fashioned hand saw get away from me. Goggles are always good with striking or power tools. Ear protection is also a must when they do get into power tools especially the saws which tend to be noisy.

Tools I would buy to start.

16oz claw hammer
Rubber or rawhide mallet or other soft faced hammer.
General purpose hand saw
A quality screwdriver set with interchangable bits (note the word quality)
brad driver, holds small nails so you don't mash your fingers
coping saw
utility knife that takes interchangable blades
2ea C clamps 4", 2"
Hand powered drill. I believe great neck and stanley both still make these.
set of drill bits. up to 3/8" is enough in the begining. (Avoid the chinese stuff)
1/4" & 1/2" wood chisels.
5" block plane (Stanley 110 is great)
sanding block
oil stone for keeping the plane and chisels sharp
A full front heavy apron not only keeps you clean, but also offers some protection.
goggles


Later add
back saw and miter box
hearing protection
3/8" electric drill and a set of spade bits
or
A brace and auger bits
jig saw


Remember a good used tool is still better than a hundred crappy ones and there are alot of crappy ones out there. A bad tool only discourages you when you can't make it work correctly.
 

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I can't give any advise on the technial end of things - what tools to buy and that sort of thing. But I can tell you that this is my 13 yr. old ds third year in woodworking for 4H. He has done the birdhouse thing, a oak napkin holder, a small step stool for the bathroom and a couple of other things. This year he decided on his own that he wanted to do a picnic table. I took him in to the store and after talking to the sale clerk, he picked out the material - I paid and we went home. Two days later - I now have a lovely new picnic table!! So I think it is all about progressing to the next level. If your son feels like he is ready to do a picnic table - let him. Good luck. :)
 

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Don't know how old your boys are. I would sugest that they build a carpenters tool box. Something to keep the tools in. Then a work bench so they can have a place to work. Then maby a gun rake that has a drawer in it. When they figure how to do the drawer then anything else they want. Don't make them build anything they don't want to build. Woodworkine can be a great pasetime or a job that you don't want to do.
 

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Questions:
1. How old are the boys?
2. What sort of adult supervision is available while they are using power tools?
3. What sort of tools does your husband already have?
4. Does your county have a 4H group specifically dedicated to woodworking skills? The leader usually has a "droolworthy" workshop at his house/barn and the kids get interaction with other kids from different parts of the county as well as trained supervision.

Is there anything I should get for saftey
ANSI rated safety glasses and hearing protection as a minimum. The safety glasses are usually $5 or so. Then make sure they wear the PPE (Personal Protective Equipment). PPE is usually a hard sell until someone gets hurt because we're used to doing everything without it.
Establish rigid ground rules for safe work practices.

When purchasing tools keep in mind that the quality of the tool has a large impact on the quality of the work you can do with it. I had a Milwaukee jigsaw for quite a few years and liked it quite a bit. Then I got a Swiss made Bosch jigsaw and was blown away.
 

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There are 3 woodworking sites listed in the links library, featuring free plans. The library is near the bottom of the home page list.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
What kind of supervision would they have while working with these tools. They don't get to look at them with out me standing there. I figure I'll be handling the more dangerous stuff. I sew with my girls and was looking for something to do with the boys besides the animals.

Thanks

Keep the ideas comming!

Caren
 

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woodsrunner said:
A pic nic table isn't rocket science. However I would suggest they start out making themselves old fashioned capenters tool boxes, followed by a workbench. In the begining the best projects are ones you make for yourself.

Here's a link to a site with free plans.

http://absolutelyfreeplans.com/OUTDOOR PROJECTS/outdoor_projects.htm

Also you might want to consider hand powered tools in the begining. For one thing precise work is easier to achieve with hand powered tools. Also I've never had a old fashioned hand saw get away from me. Goggles are always good with striking or power tools. Ear protection is also a must when they do get into power tools especially the saws which tend to be noisy.

Tools I would buy to start.

16oz claw hammer
Rubber or rawhide mallet or other soft faced hammer.
General purpose hand saw
A quality screwdriver set with interchangable bits (note the word quality)
brad driver, holds small nails so you don't mash your fingers
coping saw
utility knife that takes interchangable blades
2ea C clamps 4", 2"
Hand powered drill. I believe great neck and stanley both still make these.
set of drill bits. up to 3/8" is enough in the begining. (Avoid the chinese stuff)
1/4" & 1/2" wood chisels.
5" block plane (Stanley 110 is great)
sanding block
oil stone for keeping the plane and chisels sharp
A full front heavy apron not only keeps you clean, but also offers some protection.
goggles


Later add
back saw and miter box
hearing protection
3/8" electric drill and a set of spade bits
or
A brace and auger bits
jig saw


Remember a good used tool is still better than a hundred crappy ones and there are alot of crappy ones out there. A bad tool only discourages you when you can't make it work correctly.

pretty much covers every thing your boys will need to get started. and i second the post on starting with small projects like tool boxes and work benches. give confidence and helps round out the workshop


dean
 

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Great advice already given!!!

I love the idea about a tool box or tote.

I am concerned about buying power tools for young boys. How old are they? Have they had any experience with power tools? I know I wasn't strong enough or agile enough to handle a circular saw when I was 16.

You only get one set of fingers, one pair of eyes, and power tools can be dangerous!!!!!

If you build a picinic table, make it out of 2x6 or larger material. It will be much stronger than 2x4's.

Clove
 

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Our little tomboy niece came to stay with us a couple of years ago. This is one of the activities I'd planned for a rainy afternoon. She and our son really enjoyed making these.

http://www.runnerduck.com/toy_boat.htm



I drilled a hole and put a piece of quarter inch dowel in the center as a mast. They painted the boats and held races in the bath tub.



Looks like they have a neat blog too, with photo step by step instructions for various woodworking projects!

http://runnerduck.wordpress.com/


Pauline
 

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Bat Houses.

Seriously...a homesteaders best friend! :)
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Where can I find a hand powered drill?

Also what do the spade bits do?

I'm trying to figure out what the boys need to start out with but am really lost. I looked for the hand powered drill and it looks like I can only find it online. I even checked ebay with out any luck.

Thanks
Caren
 
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