Naturally polled?

Discussion in 'Goats' started by jen74145, Jan 5, 2007.

  1. jen74145

    jen74145 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Alright, I keep getting so mixed up. Which breeds are naturally polled? I just don't know if I could stomach disbudding (wethering, no biggie) but realize either I toughen up about it (not likely), find a naturally polled breed, or no goats.
    Looking for dairy, but heck, you can milk just about anything... any ideas?
     
  2. pookshollow

    pookshollow Pook's Hollow

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    I'm not aware of any breed that is naturally polled, although I believe that certain "lines" carry the gene.

    You have to be careful with naturally polled goats - if you breed two polled goats, there is a high risk of hermaphroditism in the offspring. You can't breed 'em and you can't milk 'em either.

    Is it the idea of burning the buds off that bothers you? You can use the dehorning paste as long as you restrain the kids for about thirty minutes and are very careful that it doesn't get anywhere other than the horn buds.
     

  3. Idahoe

    Idahoe Menagerie More~on

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    No, don't go that route. There is no easy way to get around some of these necessary tortures. I am with you in that holding a kid down and burning off his horn buds sounds horrible. You could use a vet or another experienced goat person to do it for you while you watch.
     
  4. dap

    dap lilsparrow

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    I found a vet nearby here that disbudded my babies for only $10! Shot and all...just look around, you'll probably get lucky!
     
  5. jen74145

    jen74145 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    ooh... now, if somebody else does it... I just cannot imagine holding down a kid to do that (though am impressed with those of you who can). I know it must be done, but I would feel like such a wicked, evil goat owner for hurting the babies. Probably affect me more than it does them.
    Thank you... so glad to know I'm not the only one... was a bit afraid I might get snarked at for my worry, lol.
     
  6. Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians

    Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians Well-Known Member

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    There are lots of things you likely will learn to do as you have goats that you couldn't possibly think of doing right now. Most will be learned out of necessity as your herd grows and spending even 10$ a baby goat at the vet, although with 1 or 2 kids sounds like a heck of a deal, how about 35 kids :) Find some localgoat folks, trade disbudding chores for your hoof trimming expertice, shoot I would disbud all your kids if you cleaned the dairy barn :) There is soo much opportunity to barter and trade animals and skills, you just have to think out of the box, figure you live in the most goat populous state in the union!

    Also if you don't loose the 'hurting the goat' mentality, your does will quite literally walk all over you, they are soo much smarter than some people are :) Justine recently asked how to shave her FF udders. You tie their feet to the milkstand until they are ready to stand like the goats they were bred to be! If you let goats get away with nonsense like this, like toodlers, you can't control them when they are older/teenagers! And a big ole Nubian who weighs more than you had better be started on manners early. Vicki
     
  7. jen74145

    jen74145 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Vicki:
    It's just that disbudding is so dramatic and stressful... I don't treat my animals as if they are made of glass, I can do what must be done, but this... ick, yeugggh, and no. Burning hair, screeching kid, no thanks.
    Gotta find someone who'll do it... seems 'round here, nobody disbuds anything. I'm all about swapping skills, too... once I learn some, lol.
     
  8. MillsFarmFamily

    MillsFarmFamily Well-Known Member

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    We only have a small herd, less than 20, but we don't disbud. We use the horns to handle the goats when we need to hold them to worm, etc.
     
  9. mary,tx

    mary,tx Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Most of my Nubian does are polled. But it is a dominant gene they are heterozygous(sp?) for, which means only roughly half their offspring are polled when bred to my horned bucks. I try to keep only polled does off them and disbud/sell the horned ones.
    mary
     
  10. Jan in CO

    Jan in CO Well-Known Member Supporter

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    And Mary has lovely goats! I have some of her babies, who are mammas themselves now, and have never had one that didn't breed so far, anyway!

    Jan in Co
     
  11. mary,tx

    mary,tx Well-Known Member Supporter

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  12. Starsmom

    Starsmom Well-Known Member

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    I have a naturally polled nubian doe. So far she has only thrown horned babies. I personally don't think I could do the disbudding. However, I can hold them for my friend that does it for me. No problem. It was tough the first couple times, but it is worse to see one get their head stuck in a fence or other place and either die or have to have their horns cut away to be freed. So, all mine are always disbudded. It is a necessary evil, but with the disbudding, they are only upset a few minutes and then all is well and they will still love you and harbor no ill feelings.
     
  13. HilltopDaisy

    HilltopDaisy Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I can understand how you feel. I was lucky enough to find a lovely woman here at HT who let me bring my kid to her house, and she and her hubby did it. I walked away with my hands over my ears and missed the whole thing. Thank you Joan!
     
  14. topside1

    topside1 Retired Coastie Supporter

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    Jen, I'm sorry I didn't read all the posts, but here's my two cents. Have a local farm hand, farmers son, 4H club member, or cattleman disbud your animals. They could use a little extra money, I'm sure.
     
  15. topside1

    topside1 Retired Coastie Supporter

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    I had a naturally polled buck sevice all my does. With nine does due to kid in the next three weeks it will be interesting to see how many hit the ground polled?
     
  16. mary,tx

    mary,tx Well-Known Member Supporter

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    For those of you who have polled animals or bred to one, I thought I'd put my 2cents in on looking for the characteristic in the little newborns. The first polled doe born on my property was hit hard with the disbudding iron :rolleyes: , and it was actually several years later before I looked at one of her newborn kids and exclaimed, "polled! where did that come from?" lol
    I no doubt had disbudded many of her kids that did not need it.

    I then had to sit down and think about it. Since my bucks are horned it had to be from her. Her dam was horned, but another goat I bought at the same time was polled. Finally it dawned on me that the man I had bought them from had to have had a polled buck. Not knowing any better, I had not known what to look for to determine if a kid needs disbudding.

    Once you've seen it a few times, it becomes easy to recognize. A horned kid has little swirls in his hair where the horns will be. If he is polled, the hair will lay straight forward. So if you might have polled babies, be sure and look closely at those heads. Polled will still get bumps. They will not get horns. So look closely at the hair on their heads in the first few days after birth when it is easiest to recognize.

    Simple genetics tells you that over a period of years, roughly half of a polled doe's (or buck's) offspring WILL be polled. :)

    mary
     
  17. Janis Sauncy

    Janis Sauncy Well-Known Member

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    When I was still breeding, the disbudding was the toughest part for me. There was a local woman who would do it for me for $10.00 a kid, but she pretty much told me she was only doing it as a "favor" and would rather not do it. She bred many of her own dairy and meat goats and had her hands full doing her own. So, I bought the iron and the box from "Caprine Supply" and, the last year that I did breed, did my own. Some came out ok, but I have a few with some kind of malformed scurs left. The doelings are the ones that came out good, but the boys' buds grow more aggressively and they're the ones that I had the worst time with. I, too, had a hard time with the screaming, although the person who had been doing it for me explained the pain is only for a few seconds, that once you circle the bud you've killed the nerves and any screaming after that is just because they don't want to be held down.

    When I had only a couple here and there to do, I had the vet do it. The babies slept right through it and it was sure easier on me.

    I only have does and wethers now. No more breeding (anyone want to buy a disbudding iron and "holding box?").