Natural Preventatives and Remedies for Rabbit Illnesses

Discussion in 'Rabbits' started by MaggieJ, Oct 11, 2007.

  1. MaggieJ

    MaggieJ Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Twohunnyz, I sent you a PM rather than go further off topic.
     
  2. o&itw

    o&itw aka avdpas77 Supporter

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    I don't know much about natural remedies for rabbits. I never had too much trouble with my crosbred meat rabbits. The show mini-lops were highly line breed though, and much more sensitive. I was mostly just very careful with them, constant fresh water, changed food every morning if they did not consume it all (actually, I gave it to my meat rabbits), kept everthing extremely clean like a hospital. The only problem that occured much was coccidiosis, and I treated with Corrid or amprolium, if I remember correctly.

    So you may ask why I am posting:confused:

    I did not use it, but all the old-time breeders around swore by comfrey. They would give a little each day, and insisted that their rabbits never got sick. I have no proof to give this (other than never seeing any of their rabbits sick), but they insisted it prevented everything from snuffles to premature kindling.
    Is there anyone around that uses it?
     

  3. o&itw

    o&itw aka avdpas77 Supporter

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    A second thing I rembember. I know is seems sort of rude, but it isn't the best idea to let somone come in to your rabbitry that has recently been in their own. Disease and parasites can be carried on clothing and shoes....
    and while that is not as likely as bringing it in with other rabbits, it still happens with all kinds of animals (I always kept a very close eye on the show rabbits after comming home from shows too) Also mice and other rodents, carry all kinds of things, (as do squirrels) so it is best to keep other animals from nibbling food in the feeder. Finally, loud noises can literaly scare rabbits to death. If you have to hammer nails close by, it is best to move the rabbits, or wait till they can be moved. Uh.... if you need to sight your deer rifle... it would be best to do it on the next 40.:rolleyes:

    What did my mom say? "An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure"
    That is about as natural as one can get, I would think. :)
     
  4. MaggieJ

    MaggieJ Well-Known Member Supporter

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    O&itw, good husbandry practices are very important for everyone, and biosecurity (the polite term for keeping people out of livestock facilities) also makes good sense. Your mom was right.

    Comfrey has many beneficial properties, but there are also concerns about its use. Here's a pretty good article about it that discusses its uses and its safety for those who are interested in getting more information.

    http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/AFCM/comfrey.html
     
  5. o&itw

    o&itw aka avdpas77 Supporter

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    Thanks Maggie....off to do some more studying.

    Do you have personal experience with comfrey?
     
  6. MaggieJ

    MaggieJ Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Very little. There were a few plants of Russian comfrey (I think) growing in the edge of our woods when we moved here... but it's thick there and I seldom venture in to harvest it. I planted a bit about three years ago in a moist section of our south field. It is alive but not thriving... maybe it is too moist. I like having it around, just in case I need it, but really have not done much with it. Because of all the cautions, I treat it more as a medicinal than a food for the buns, although I have fed a bit dried to the buns on occasion. Just a leaf once in a while. They ate it but without any great enthusiasm.
     
  7. MaggieJ

    MaggieJ Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Good advice from Meg Z and Danaus29 on coping with Back Injuries in Rabbits. This was copied from the thread Hindquarter Paralyzed
    http://www.homesteadingtoday.com/showthread.php?t=288508


     
  8. MariMamaBunny

    MariMamaBunny Member

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    My Netherland dwarf "Noodle" had a similar problem, he had been paralyzed from the entire left side of his body and his face as well. (this was from heat stroke). Since i work in the supplement and herb store i had a wide selection of what i could use to help him. I had to liquify his food (he could not eat solids) and gave him a formula similar to babys forumla mixed with colostrum and probiotics. I aslo infused his water with ionic minerals and indigenous growth hormone (or commonly deer antler velvet). Also for the regaining nerve repair i also used brewers yeast about 1/4 tsp in milk or any liq. and i am happy to state that in only one month of this he is eating solids, and has function of all his extremities. The one thing he was left with tho is the "shakes", or "tremors" i still trying to find a treatment of that:shrug:. -mari
     
  9. MaggieJ

    MaggieJ Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Thanks to Ozarkquilter46 for the following suggestion:

     
  10. MaggieJ

    MaggieJ Well-Known Member Supporter

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    This is a cut and paste from another thread, but I wanted to get it recorded here, as well, for future reference.

     
  11. Elsbet

    Elsbet Well-Known Member Supporter

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    When I used to raise angoras, I'd give them a papaya enzyme tablet every couple of days to help keep them from getting wool block. Another angora breeder had told me to do that, and we always had healthy rabbits. The enzyme helps to break down the hair in the gut, apparently, and keep things moving.
    I also gave them to our meat rabbits. The buns love them, and gobble them down like candy. You can get the tablets OTC in any store that sells natural supplements, and they aren't terribly expensive (if you don't have a zillion rabbits, anyway).
     
  12. Therida

    Therida New Member

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    I have read in many places that Chamomile tea is a natural remedy for an eye infection. I have a doe with an infection, and we are working to get her to a vet as soon as possible, but I want to clear to start to do what I can. Can anyone else support the Chamomile tea claim or recommend anything else?
     
  13. MaggieJ

    MaggieJ Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Both black tea and chamomile tea make a soothing wash for eye infections. Many people add a teaspoon of honey to the chamomile, but I would not do that if there are wasps around... It may attract them and bunny doesn't need that.
     
  14. laughaha

    laughaha Well-Known Member

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    I have a question about the fresh pumpkin seeds. I am growing a lot of pumpkins this year so I will have access to fresh seeds for at least 5 months. Can I freeze some to give to them the other parts of the year? I should end up with ALOT of extra pumpkin seeds provided gardening stays good for the rest of the year.

    Oh, and do they have to be the regular pumpkins or are Jarrahdale (blue), Rouge vif d'Etampes (red), Fortna (white), and Blue Hubbards okay too? Oh, and since pumpkins are really just squashes anyways, will other squash seeds work too? Like Zuchini, Delicata, yellow's?
     
  15. MaggieJ

    MaggieJ Well-Known Member Supporter

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    From what I have read, all squash and pumpkin seeds act as wormers. I don't see why you couldn't freeze them, but it might be easier to dry them. They can't be any harder than black oil sunflower seeds.

    Here's a link to a recent thread in case you missed it:
    http://www.homesteadingtoday.com/showthread.php?t=311051

    Just a reminder to those just coming into this topic that seeds purchased for planting are not safe for rabbits. Most of them have been treated with fungicides etc. Stick to ones purchased as feed or ones you have harvested yourself.
     
  16. laughaha

    laughaha Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the link. I'm not sure how I missed it as I'm on here almost every day but I had.
     
  17. Ann Mary

    Ann Mary Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Please note that it should read GRAPEFRUIT seed extract and not grapeseed extract. Sorry about that. This was a correction to the post about using it for treatment of coccidia...
     
  18. MaggieJ

    MaggieJ Well-Known Member Supporter

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    While I was investigating Queen Anne's Lace as a possible rabbit food (I'd always thought it was considered toxic to rabbits, but apparently not!) I stumbled across a treatment for bloat that I had not heard of before. It comes from Dana Krempels, Phd., whom I have come to consider a reliable source. It relates to baby wild rabbits, but should be useful for domestic rabbits as well.

    Incidentally, she also okays Queen Anne's Lace, Daucus carotais, as a bunny green... and even recommends serving it root, attached soil and all.

    Here's the link to the whole article:
    http://en.allexperts.com/q/Rabbits-703/Wild-bunny-care.htm
     
  19. bigfoot2you

    bigfoot2you Hey Nan!

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    SICK BUNNY HELP!

    I have a year old mini rex female that has just developed a runny nose, right side only and kinda an icky eye same side. I looked it up here on a sticky and I think it is sniffles? She has been perfectly healthy, although a bit chunky since coming to me, and seemed to develop it out of the blue? Will it spread to others easily? Anything I can do without going to the vets?

    Thank you
     
  20. bigfoot2you

    bigfoot2you Hey Nan!

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    :( KINDA NEW HERE AND i POSTED THIS IN THE WRONG AREA.......I DON'T KNOW HOW TO FIX IT................HELP:eek: