Natural pesticides for the garden

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by BertaBurtonLake, Jun 15, 2006.

  1. BertaBurtonLake

    BertaBurtonLake Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    217
    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2005
    Location:
    Virginia
    I did a search on here, but could not find what I wanted, so here is the question. Are there any natural pesticides I can use on my vegetable garden that can be made from things I might have here? Something is eating the heck out of my squash plant leaves and I need to put something on them. I can dust with DE as I have that, But I do not want to kill the pollinators or beneficial bugs.

    I cannot get out to buy anything as I crushed 2 toes on my right foot last Friday so driving is out, hence the need for "recipes" I can make using things I would have on hand.

    Thanks for your help.

    ~Berta
     
  2. amwitched

    amwitched Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,178
    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2004
    Location:
    Texas
    Chop up some jalapenos and garlic, add it to a gallon of water - let it ferment for a couple days and spray it on.

    Mix up some soapy water and spray it on (at night) and rinse it off in the morning.

    Sometimes you can hand pick the critters off of your plants, too.
     

  3. moonwolf

    moonwolf Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,576
    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2004
    Location:
    Canada
    I was going to say pretty much the same as amwitched.
    Garlic and hot pepper seeds ground up and added to water. Pretty good all around.
     
  4. BertaBurtonLake

    BertaBurtonLake Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    217
    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2005
    Location:
    Virginia
    thank you both very much. Garlic and hot peppers (jalapeno and cayenne) I got!!

    ~Berta
     
  5. culpeper

    culpeper Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,187
    Joined:
    Nov 1, 2002
    Location:
    Australia
    GARLIC SPRAY:
    Soak 1/2 cup crushed garlic cloves in 1/2 cup vegetable oil for one week. Add a little liquid soap and dilute the mixture - 1 part mixture to 10 parts water. Garlic spay will kill and repel aphids, woolly aphids, bean fly, stink bugs, crickets, grasshoppers, red spider mite, sawfly larvae, scale, snails, slugs, thrips and caterpillars, mosquitoes and ticks, the adult moths of leaf-miners and mealy bugs. It is an effective fungicide when used 3-4 times a week against potato blight and damping off.
    OR
    Crush 100g garlic, 2 chillies and 2 onions and cover with water for 24 hours. Strain and add enough water to make up 2 litres.
     
  6. SusanB

    SusanB Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    58
    Joined:
    May 26, 2006
    Location:
    Western, NY

    I live in a area in NY where most of the chip potatoes for Lays are grown. Needless to say, my neighboring potatoe farmers want me to spray my tomatoes and potatoes for blight. I was searching for help because I am trying to grow my produce for an organic(not certified) farm stand. I searced and found this recipoie. When would I apply this? Do I start as soon as the potatoe plants emerge or the tomatoe plants are transplanted? Experts say to water these plants on the roots not the foliage so if you spray this on the leaves won't that be counterproductive? If I am to spray it on the leaves I presume it would be better to do it in the morning so that the water can burn off before evening, but then will it still be effective? This organic stuff is not easy...how did they grow these plants before we had chemicals?

    Susan
     
  7. Steve L.

    Steve L. Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,047
    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2004
    Location:
    NY - Finger Lakes Region
    I'm not much into organics, but I might be able to help with a few of your questions.

    The amount of water you put on with a sprayer is less than the dew you'll get most mornings. It's inconsequential with regard to disease.

    Yes, spray in the AM when the dew is still present. This will help spread the spray around on the leaves, and, unless there's just so much dew on the leaves that any additional water leads to a lot of runoff, it'll work just fine.

    With lots of disease, total crop failures in some years, and they ate lots of 'sub-standard" food that cost a lot more (adjusted for inflation), had bankrupcy level (by today's standards) yields, and worked like slaves. Other than that, though...

    (sigh): the good old days! :dance:

    I wish I could live like that! :bash:

    (Sadly, I kinda do!) :shrug:
     
  8. sleeps723

    sleeps723 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    745
    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2006
    Location:
    east texas
    pick u up a whole lotta bugs. kill them and put them in a jug of water and let ferment for a few days. strain into a sprayer and spray on the garden. bugs hate it.
     
  9. turtlehead

    turtlehead Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,390
    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2005
    Location:
    Central WV
    The garlic/pepper spray and the bug juice work to deter bugs. I think blight fungus is air-borne and not spread by bugs, but I could be wrong.

    Look for a product called "Serenade" - it is organic. You can google "organic serenade blight" and find some hits.

    Copper spray can also be used to fight blight and I believe it's currently got the "okay" for organic use but there is a bit of controversy about it. You can find more info by googling "organic blight copper".
     
  10. culpeper

    culpeper Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,187
    Joined:
    Nov 1, 2002
    Location:
    Australia
    The garlic spray is a good treatment for fungus, and is a specific for powdery mildew. Chamomile tea is also used for the purpose.

    BORDEAUX MIXTURE:
    Mix 90g copper sulphate with 4.5 litres hot water and leave overnight. Next day, mix 125g slaked lime with 4.5 litres cold water. Combine both mixtures by stirring vigorously. Use immediately to treat a wide range of rots, mildews and blights. Bordeaux spray may clog nozzles. Also, if over-used, it may lead to a build up of copper in the soil and associated toxicity.

    CHIVE SPRAY:
    An infusion of 1 litre of water and 1 cup of chopped leaves is a mild insect repellent, a fungicide and an antiseptic. It may assist in the treatment of downy or powdery mildew if applied regularly. Use the spray within a few hours.

    FUNGICIDE/POWDERY MILDEW SPRAY:
    4 litres water
    3 tablespoons bicarbonate of soda
    1 tablespoon household bleach
    1 teaspoon dishwashing detergent

    Snip and remove leaves that are worst affected. Mix ingredients with water. Spray remaining leaves top and undersides. Apply a heavier dose on leaves that have signs of infection and only lightly on unaffected leaves as bleach can actually harm and discolor the leaves.
     
  11. Pony

    Pony Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    19,807
    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2003
    I've generally had fairly good results with Bt on squash plants. From what I have read and in my experience, neither Bt nor DE will hurt beneficials.

    Last year was miserable for cucumber beetles, though. I did end up using pyrethrines and rotenone. I hated doing it, even if they are plant-based, but the darned bugs were so numerous that the infestation was like the plagues visited on the Egyptians in Exodus. :(

    Good luck! :)

    Pony!
     
  12. plantaholic

    plantaholic Active Member

    Messages:
    36
    Joined:
    Jun 28, 2005
    Location:
    Tennessee
    I blend up lemon balm in my vitamix very fine, then Istrain it through cheesecloth and spray. I do this 2 times a week and more if has rained. It keeps the squash bugs and beetles confused, what kinda plant is this? No it is not as effectives as chemicals but it does keep things under control.

    I agree about BT it keeps squash vine borers, cabbage loopers and corn earworms in check.