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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I have never been able to get a suitable answer to my simple
Question on this.

I have a Nanking cherry bush now about 6 x 6 ft.
In five years since planted as a small bush it has blossomed
but never giving fruit.

Does it need another Nanking cherry bush for pollination
to provide fruit production?
 

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Yes....James

Nanking Cherry

The fruit of Nanking cherries (Prunus tomentosa) is bright red and sweet. It is excellent for use in jelly and wine making but lacks the size and firmness necessary for canning. Nankings are available from many Alberta nurseries. Nanking cherry can be propagated by dividing the crowns of established bushes or planting the seed. Nanking cherries need cross pollination, for fruit production, therefore more than one plant is required, or an early flowering plum such as Brookgold, Bounty or Dandy. Mature plants reach heights of up to 2 m. Plant in rows 3 m apart with 2 m between the plants in the row. Prune annually to prevent shrubs from becoming too dense. Remove no more than one-third of the total number of branches at one time. This allows the plant to replace older wood with young, vigorous wood.

http://www.arborday.org/treeguide/treeDetail.cfm?ID=219
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks.
So, I might split off some suckering root growth of my one
Nanking now and replant that nearby I might get lucky in the
future for some fruit!
I will check the local nurseries for possible stock.
 

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Thanks.
So, I might split off some suckering root growth of my one
Nanking now and replant that nearby I might get lucky in the
future for some fruit!
I will check the local nurseries for possible stock.
That made me think...

Will a sucker that is moved 20 feet away from the parent plant eventually be capable of pollinating the parent plant?

I would think if that was possible then the parent would be self pollinating in the first place. Not sure....

I do not know, but I hope someone else does.

Anyone???

TRellis
 

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http://www.ext.colostate.edu/pubs/garden/07002.html

This says that Nanking is self fertile.??? I have a Stella and a Nanking cherry. They both produce. There are no other cherries in pollentatiing distance so they are either both self pollinating or they cross pollinate. I don't know which.
 

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http://www.ext.colostate.edu/pubs/garden/07002.html

This says that Nanking is self fertile.??? I have a Stella and a Nanking cherry. They both produce. There are no other cherries in pollentatiing distance so they are either both self pollinating or they cross pollinate. I don't know which.

Definitions


  • Pollination: the transfer of pollen from the anthers to the stigma of a flower.
  • Self-pollination: when the transfer of pollen occurs within the same variety.
  • Cross-pollination: when the transfer of pollen occurs between two varieties.
  • Self-unfruitful: very little fruit will set unless the blossoms are fertilized with pollen of another variety.
  • Self-fruitful: varieties that set fruit with their own pollen.
  • Cross-unfruitful: two varieties that, when cross-pollinated, will not set fruit.
  • Compatible: varieties that fertilize each other.
  • Parthenocarpic: fruit that is set and grown without fertilization (no seeds present).

Self fruitful; Meaning they pollinate themselves (more than 1 plant).

Not self fruitful; need a pollinator from a different variety....James
 

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Ok but it is still confusing to me because my link says Nanking is self fruiting while yours say more than one bush is needed of the same variety. How can the same flower, removed a few feet, do better than a blossom on the other side of the tree?
Another variety I can see but the same? It is something I have never considered.
So got something I can read to understand what the difference is?
 

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Self fruiting is different than self pollinating. Self fruiting means it does not need a different variety to pollinate, like a lot of cherries. Self pollinating needs no other plant near. These cherries can do either, another variety, even plums, that bloom at the same time, or, another plant the same. Bartlett pears need 2 trees near, that bloom at the same time, 1 will not pollinate itself....James
 

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Whoa, guys. It's genus, then species, then variety (or cultivar)

It's Prunus, tomentosa, Nanking

CHERRY is just a POP name given to lots of berries that look like cherries and not apricots, plums, or peaches; the word has no scientific meaning to botanists, except they like to eat pies, too

A Nanking cherry IS self-pollinating, but does not set fruit very well when it is by itself, thus you should plant two or more Nanking cherries together so the bees can get enough pollen from them to spread it around....... Because it is not a commercial type of berry, very little research has been done on the flowers, stamen, or pollen characteristics to tell us just why you need more than one plant for good fruit set. Apparently though there are many flowers(there are on mine---Prunus, tomentosa, Hansen), the pollen may be lacking is some respect.

No other Prunus(plum, sweet cherry, sour cherry, ground cherry,apricot, etc, etc. will pollinate a Nanking, except another Nanking close by... They are all OTHER SPECIES. It can be a clone of the same bush, as in a root cutting, a clump from the old one, a seedling....OR the pollen from a Hansen's cherry, because it is the same species, but different variety. It was developed from the Nanking.

The Arbor Day foundation( or anyone else) is in error when it says it needs cross pollination, if you go by the definition that cross pollination is from another variety. That would be using the term cross-pollination in a different way. Nanking will pollinate itself, and it will do it much better if there is a companion bush. It is only correct if it advises you to place a Hansen's cherry beside it.

The answer to moonwolf's question is yes......
Hope this makes it a very tasty pie. That made me hungry for one of my Aunt Sara's pies....

geo
 

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It is confusing that Nanking cherry is listed as a pollinator for Carmine Jewell Dwarf cherry, which also is not in the same species.

I read that Prunus Avium , prunus cerasus and prunus fruticosa are all capable of cross pollenation, and are probably related, while Nanking cherry is recommended to increased fruit set on carmine jewel dwarf cherry- who are appparently not related but is a prunus cerasus and fruticosa cross.

It's still confusing. But I guess that is a fine point- two nanking cherrys are needed to increase the volume of fruit set. Although I still don't understand how two of the same species increase fruit as the both will be in competition for the pollen volume (two trees worth of flowers would seem to take the same volume of pollen between them as one does.)
 

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Discussion Starter #11
See what I mean?

The fact remains is that my very health flourishing Nanking
cherry bush grows nicely, but DOES NOT produce fruit
after flowering.

In the vicinity of this plant grows wild plums , another
variety of cherry plum and a true cherry (Julia ) bush.

????
 

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[FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]CHERRY - NANKING[/FONT]​
[FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Height: 6-8 feet[/FONT]
[FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]BLACK OR RED
[/FONT]​
[FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Also called Manchu Cherry
[/FONT]

[FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif][/FONT]​
[FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Spread: 6-8 feet[/FONT] [FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Flowers: Pink buds open into white spring flowers[/FONT] [FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Growth Rate: Medium[/FONT] [FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Zone: 2[/FONT] [FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Lifespan: Short [/FONT] [FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Nanking cherry is the earliest blooming cherry and one of the best fruit-producers for northern areas. They have dull green, veined leaves that do not color up in the fall. The Nanking is an upright spreading bush.They make wonderful informal hedges, good for mass plantings in large shrub beds or background shrubs in small beds. Cross pollination is essential for good fruit production. Pincherry, Nanking cherry, chokecherry and sandcherry all cross-pollinate. Nanking cherries can self pollinate however cross pollination provides greater fruit production. They require full sun and moderately drained soil

Birds love these tiny, sweet cherries which are excellent for pies, jams and fresh off the bush.
[/FONT]
 

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It is confusing that Nanking cherry is listed as a pollinator for Carmine Jewell Dwarf cherry, which also is not in the same species.

I read that Prunus Avium , prunus cerasus and prunus fruticosa are all capable of cross pollenation, and are probably related, while Nanking cherry is recommended to increased fruit set on carmine jewel dwarf cherry- who are appparently not related but is a prunus cerasus and fruticosa cross.

It's still confusing. But I guess that is a fine point- two nanking cherrys are needed to increase the volume of fruit set. Although I still don't understand how two of the same species increase fruit as the both will be in competition for the pollen volume (two trees worth of flowers would seem to take the same volume of pollen between them as one does.)
Re: Carmine Jewel Dwarf cherry, you might enjoy this article from the University of Saskatchewan which developed it in a very long breeding program in order to find a sour(tart) cherry, Prunus cerasus, that would do well in their extreme Northern climate..They did that by deliberately hybridizing different varieties until they came up with the one they named Carmine Jewel. They then stabilized it by tissue culture and offered it to the public as a new cultivar. It is stated to be self-pollinating, so I don't know where you got the statement that it needs Nanking as a pollinator...? I think I would try this new cherry, since it IS self-pollinating, it does withstand cold winters, and since it is in bush form, it would be easier to net and prevent bird damage. It also looks like it would be a very tasty pie cherry, too. The only drawback would be the long time before production begins....

http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/96-325-x/2007000/article/10775-eng.htm

As for why the Nanking needing more than one plant to do well in setting fruit; it isn't known yet, and maybe never. Lots of study would have to be done to figure it out, and as long as Nanking is not considered a commercial contender, very little time will be devoted to it. It may be mechanical, or even something at the molecular level that makes it so. Thankfully it's an easy fix to just plant another Nanking (prunus tomentosa) variety to go along with it. When I read something in a sales catalog that a certain tree needs another, different(not of the same species) tree for cross pollination, I remain skeptical. It just seems a good way to exploit lack of information and sell another tree, doesn't it?

geo
 

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Re: Carmine Jewel Dwarf cherry, you might enjoy this article from the University of Saskatchewan which developed it in a very long breeding program in order to find a sour(tart) cherry, Prunus cerasus, that would do well in their extreme Northern climate..They did that by deliberately hybridizing different varieties until they came up with the one they named Carmine Jewel. They then stabilized it by tissue culture and offered it to the public as a new cultivar. It is stated to be self-pollinating, so I don't know where you got the statement that it needs Nanking as a pollinator...? I think I would try this new cherry, since it IS self-pollinating, it does withstand cold winters, and since it is in bush form, it would be easier to net and prevent bird damage. It also looks like it would be a very tasty pie cherry, too. The only drawback would be the long time before production begins....

http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/96-325-x/2007000/article/10775-eng.htm

As for why the Nanking needing more than one plant to do well in setting fruit; it isn't known yet, and maybe never. Lots of study would have to be done to figure it out, and as long as Nanking is not considered a commercial contender, very little time will be devoted to it. It may be mechanical, or even something at the molecular level that makes it so. Thankfully it's an easy fix to just plant another Nanking (prunus tomentosa) variety to go along with it. When I read something in a sales catalog that a certain tree needs another, different(not of the same species) tree for cross pollination, I remain skeptical. It just seems a good way to exploit lack of information and sell another tree, doesn't it?

geo
The source I saw said nanking cherry could increase the fruit production of carmine jewel, which is self fertile.
 

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Do you have bees nearby? If you have no pollinators you will have no fruit, no matter how many plant you have.
 

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The source I saw said nanking cherry could increase the fruit production of carmine jewel, which is self fertile.[/QUOTE

And that source is: ????

geo
I looked but only found the same nursery sources repeating the same wording, like Gurney's. So you're right that there is a suspect motive possible. Who knows......
 
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