name this plant

Discussion in 'Plant and Tree Identification' started by bonnie lass, Apr 6, 2005.

  1. bonnie lass

    bonnie lass Semper Fi

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    The leaves and roots of this indigenous biennial smell and taste like peppers and radishes. It was one of the first edible wild plants to be exported back to Europe where it became wildly popular. It was a staple food of the Blackfoot tribe and was used as a hunting charm. The long taproot makes an excellent cooked vegetable. The tender young leaves can be cooked or used in salads. The root can be dried, candied, made into pickles, used to thicken soup, or boiled in honey to make a soothing cough syrup. Native Americans used root tea to treat obesity and bowel pains. Tea made from the flowers is mildly sedative. Recent research has shown the seed oil to useful in treating a great many maladies including PMS, menopause, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, schizophrenia, Parkinson’s disease, high blood pressure, memory loss, alcoholism, anorexia, hyperactivity, asthma, migraines, diabetes, prostatitis, eczema, and heart disease. The oil contains the essential fatty acids gamma-linolenic acid, gamma-linoleic acid, and vitamin F which are converted in the body to hormone-like substances (prostaglandins) that regulate many body functions and reduce pain and inflammation. Although the oil is currently available at any health-food store, there is a movement afoot to require a doctor’s prescription to obtain it.
     
  2. marvella

    marvella Well-Known Member

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    i don't even have a wild guess, but i'm glad to see you posting, bonnie! :)
     

  3. bare

    bare Head Muderator

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    Ya got me too and I grew up in Blackfoot country. I do have a couple guesses but maybe you can narrow it down. Did the Blackfeet have to travel out of their usual digs to acquire this plant?

    My first guess though would be prairie turnip but I don't remember what the top tastes like and doubt that health food stores carry turnip oil but what would I know?
     
  4. moonwolf

    moonwolf Well-Known Member

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    I'm going to guess Budock. Arctium lappa
    It's a biennial plant with lots of herbal/medicinal uses but extracts should be taken with caution. There is an oil produced from Burdock used mostly for skin disorders, and the root has edible uses.
    Well, that's my guess anyway.

    Rich
     
  5. Tater'sPa

    Tater'sPa Well-Known Member

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    Evening Primrose
    It was also used by the Cherokee, Iroquois, Ojibwas, and Potawatomi
     
  6. bare

    bare Head Muderator

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    Evening Primrose oil sounds right, It's commonly available and reactive to other drugs, itching from eczema treatment and all, but I've tasted the roots and to me they're sorta nutty, not peppery. And isn't Primrose everywhere in some form or another? I was thinking of something primarily in the Blackfoot tromping grounds.

    I thought of Burdock too but I've never seen Burdock oil, I think it's either used as a poultice or infusion.

    Come on Bonnie, you can't leaf us hanging like this!
     
  7. marvella

    marvella Well-Known Member

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    i bet you guys are right. that "commonly sold in health food stores" was the part that got me. it grows wild about everywhere, doesn't it? i planted it one year, not realizing until it bloomed that i was mowing it down everywhere else.:)
     
  8. bonnie lass

    bonnie lass Semper Fi

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    You guys are amazing, evening primrose it is. Sorry Bare, didn't mean to "leaf" you hanging, but I just now got home. This plant does seem to be everywhere, I know it's all over my yard. I love all plants, even the lowly weeds, but I have to confess that I find this one rather homely, never as pretty as the pictures I see in books.