name this plant

Discussion in 'Plant and Tree Identification' started by bonnie lass, Mar 5, 2005.

  1. bonnie lass

    bonnie lass Semper Fi

    Messages:
    194
    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2004
    Location:
    Beautiful Cape Cod
    The blooms of this common plant, considered a weed by most, are either white or purple. The white is a native species and the purple, imported from Europe as a hay crop, is now a state flower. Both species bloom from spring to fall. Native Americans often ate the entire plant, and used the leaf tea for colds, coughs, and fevers. The high protein leaves are a staple in Chinese cuisine. The flowers make an excellent tea, can be added to salads, or dried and ground into flour. A strong infusion of flowers and leaves is good for detoxification. It stimulates and cleanses the liver and gallbladder. The tea is anti-inflammatory, calming, expectorant, and anti-spasmodic. It's full of nutrients, including beta carotene, vitamins C, B1, B2, B3, B5, B6, B9, B12, biotin, choline, inositol, bioflavinoids, magnesium, manganese, zinc, copper, and selenium. It has been used to treat rheumatism, gout, asthma, and cancer. It is an ingredient of the Hoxsey formula.
     
  2. Tater'sPa

    Tater'sPa Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    695
    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2002
    Everything in your description, except for the above quote lead me to think red clover, also used in essiac tea.
    I didn't know about the chinese cuisine but that does makes sense :)
    Is that right?
     

  3. moonwolf

    moonwolf Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,576
    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2004
    Location:
    Canada
    I was thinking at first to be Mullein, but on second thought I think it's Burdock.
     
  4. marvella

    marvella Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,910
    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2003
    Location:
    tn
    i agree with clover. there are a wide variety of them, and almost all of them are both edible and medicinal.
     
  5. Turalura

    Turalura Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    83
    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2004
    Is it Amaranth?
    Just guessing but I want some of whatever it is :haha:
     
  6. bonnie lass

    bonnie lass Semper Fi

    Messages:
    194
    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2004
    Location:
    Beautiful Cape Cod
    Clover is correct!!! The bit about chinese cuisine comes from "Identifying and Harvesting Edible and Medicinal Plants in Wild (and Not So Wild) Places" by "Wildman" Steve Brill. Quote "...clover's high-protein leaves are a staple in China, where overpopulation makes protein scarce, and that people haggle over the price and quality. Personally, I don't care for clover leaves' flavor or texture, raw or cooked. I like using them for making vegetable stock, and they're acceptable for making tea." The other book I used was Peterson's field guide for Medicinal Plants and Herbs, Eastern/Central region.