name this plant - Yarrow aka soldier's woundwort

Discussion in 'Plant and Tree Identification' started by bonnie lass, Mar 20, 2005.

  1. bonnie lass

    bonnie lass Semper Fi

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    Ok, here's an easy one (I think). This perennial plant is the symbol of war. It was named for the warrior Achilles, who always carried it with him. He reportedly applied compresses of this plant to the wounds sustained by his warriors because it promotes blood clotting (vulnerary). Native Americans have used this plant for the same purpose. The plant, fresh or dried, makes a good styptic. For centuries, women have drunk the tea to relieve heavy menstruation. The tea is a cleansing tonic, good for the heart and digestive system. It slows the heartbeat, lowers blood pressure, and is diuretic. A stronger brew is also diaphoretic (sweat inducing), as well as expectorant and analgesic, good for treating colds and flu. Research has identified over 120 compounds in this plant (more than a dozen are anti-inflammatory), including achilleine, coumarin, cyanidin, azulene, and salicylic acid. The peppery tasting leaf can be added to salads, and the flowers used to flavor liquers. The flowers are also used to treat eczema and hay fever. Although this plant is styptic, it is reported that if a soft, fresh leaf is inserted in the nostril and twirled around, it will cause a nose bleed :confused:
     
  2. Tater'sPa

    Tater'sPa Well-Known Member

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    It was also used by confederate soldiers in the civil war to stop bleeding.
    Several years ago while stretching barb wire, I cut my hand. Not being close to the house and no first aid "kit" :) Mother nature has a kit of her own.
    Yarrow aka soldier's woundwort
    Worked like a charm!
     

  3. bonnie lass

    bonnie lass Semper Fi

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    Right again Tater'sPa :D
     
  4. zgator

    zgator New Member

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    OK

    I'm doing all kinds of research on what I can use that is growing in my field. Now I have always loooooved the smell of yarrow - so I was thrilled to see that it was edible. But I am surprised to see that it is not used as a spice in cooking! The dried leaves taste almost like a basil and I can imagine the flavor in pasta sauce.

    Am I just way out in left field on this?

    What do you all think?

    Zee
     
  5. bonnie lass

    bonnie lass Semper Fi

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    My yarrow has no scent, at least that I have ever noticed. I just ran out to the yard to smell, and it smells clean, maybe, but no real aroma. I also just nibbled a leaf and I have to say that there is no real flavor. I will let it dry and see if it gets stronger. Are you sure you have yarrow? If so, I would love to get some seed from you.
     
  6. bare

    bare Head Muderator

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    Our Yarrow in Idaho is VERY fragrant and makes a wonderfully flavored sun tea. I've never dried it, but just pick handsfull and toss it in a gallon jar of water on the porch.
     
  7. Tamar

    Tamar Well-Known Member

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    Yarrow blooms from June to September in the eastern part of the United States. Flowers are in flat-topped clusters at the ends of the stems. The individual "flowers" are very small, with fine white "petals" and a yellowish center. This "flower" is actually two separate, distinct male and female flowers. The female flowers are in the yellow center surrounded by five white "petals," each one of which is a male flower.


    The entire plant has a strong, pungent odor and a bitter taste. If Yarrow is eaten by cows (as occasionally happens) it gives a very unpleasant taste to milk products and makes them inedible.


    Yarrow is a perennial, reproducing by seeds and from underground runners. It is native and widespread in the United States and grows throughout Europe and Asia as well.


    There is a variety of Yarrow that has beautiful purple flowers. It is grown in gardens and is called Ornamental Yarrow. This color is sometimes (but rarely) found in wild plants as well.

    http://www.ashtreepublishing.com/Book_City_Herbal_Yarrow.htm
     
  8. Kazahleenah

    Kazahleenah Disgruntled citizen

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    And grandad gave it to my uncles to cure their Hangovers.


    Kaza
     
  9. dlangland

    dlangland dlangland

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    I have both white and the original yellow taking over and even seeding up in my lawn. I wasn't going to even take any plants or seed with me when I move, because I am allergic to it...hayfever...but maybe I should. Could you explain how to do this, please? Thank you.